Pinarello Suspension Road bike released
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  1. #1

  2. #2
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    Cool. For most, it's Fred Porn.

  3. #3
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    I haven't bought a bike in over two years. Got the itch. If the non suspended one has direct mount brakes I'll get one.

    Crumbling infrastructure is grim reality here. My daily commute was great ten years ago but now it is worse than Paris Roubaix. It would be impossible on my Dogma now. I have to use my mountain bike.
    Last edited by Cinelli 82220; 04-02-2015 at 06:05 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinelli 82220 View Post


    I haven't bought a bike in over two years. Got the itch. If the non suspended one has direct mount brakes I'll get one.

    Crumbling infrastructure is grim reality here. My daily commute was great ten years ago but now it is worse than Paris Roubaix. It would be impossible on my Dogma now. I have to use my mountain bike.
    That would be the world'd nicest commuter bike!
    Dogma, synapse disc, caad 10, de rosa neo primato, felt CX, epic, fat bike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donn12 View Post
    That would be the world'd nicest commuter bike!
    Nahh, saw on EBay a Colnago CX, not cyclo cross, the steel aero one from the early 1980s. Full Super Record and pantographed, and fenders and chainguard and flat bars.

    Got sniped at the last second argghhh.

  6. #6
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    What did it go for?
    Waxahachie, Texas
    Biciclette Gios

    "Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown."

  7. #7
    merckxman
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    The only frame that Ernesto considers a failure, btw....

    Quote Originally Posted by Cinelli 82220 View Post
    Nahh, saw on EBay a Colnago CX, not cyclo cross, the steel aero one from the early 1980s. Full Super Record and pantographed, and fenders and chainguard and flat bars.

    Got sniped at the last second argghhh.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinelli 82220 View Post
    Nahh, saw on EBay a Colnago CX, not cyclo cross, the steel aero one from the early 1980s. Full Super Record and pantographed, and fenders and chainguard and flat bars.

    Got sniped at the last second argghhh.
    I like the one with the weird 90 degree angled crank arms ==> Colnago Oval CX Small Size 48x52 Campagnolo Super Record Groupset Steel Columbus | eBay

  9. #9
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    This bike is for two types of riders:

    A) pussies. (lost all respect for Team Sky)
    B) senior citizens pushing 90.

  10. #10
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    Nice technology incorporation. Not something most of us need as we aren't on cobbles, but if I had to ride them regularly it would be something to consider.
    As Campy 11 chains don't follow the 12 1/16" rule, it's wise to change them at 132.60 mm max.
    Lights and road riding - it's not about what you need to see, it's what it takes to be seen.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    This bike is for two types of riders:

    A) pussies. (lost all respect for Team Sky)
    B) senior citizens pushing 90.
    I almost said something very similar, then i thought "what kind of jerk says this?" I looked at your profile and saw we are both from Philly. It all makes sense now. lolz

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    This bike is for two types of riders:

    A) pussies. (lost all respect for Team Sky)
    B) senior citizens pushing 90.
    I don't know, it's really very similar to what Trek did with the Domane, but it's aero. I actually really like that aspect of seeing aerodynamics combined with comfort features. It's funky, but all things considered, I am cool with it. Though at this point, it's probably not something I would buy and definitely not something I would spend Pinarello money on (with bikes like the Diverge, Cannondale Synapse, GT Grade, Jamis Renegade, etc. available at significantly lower price points). I think the lingering question after looking at the bike for a while though is: if you are going to go all the way to the point of adding suspension to a road bike, why not add disc brakes and clearance for wider wheels/tires and jump in the adventure riding/any road/gravel racing segment that is growing and becoming more popular???? Stopping half way seems to limit the utility for some.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    I don't know, it's really very similar to what Trek did with the Domane, but it's aero. I actually really like that aspect of seeing aerodynamics combined with comfort features. It's funky, but all things considered, I am cool with it. Though at this point, it's probably not something I would buy and definitely not something I would spend Pinarello money on (with bikes like the Diverge, Cannondale Synapse, GT Grade, Jamis Renegade, etc. available at significantly lower price points). I think the lingering question after looking at the bike for a while though is: if you are going to go all the way to the point of adding suspension to a road bike, why not add disc brakes and clearance for wider wheels/tires and jump in the adventure riding/any road/gravel racing segment that is growing and becoming more popular???? Stopping half way seems to limit the utility for some.
    It can be seen as similar to what Trek did with Domane, but I think the overall feel they are going for is quite different. Im not a fan of suspension, so I may be biased a bit. I like to feel the surface im riding on. Ive ridden a Domane and although I agree its a great ride, it felt to "soft" to me, for lack of a better description.
    This technology is a good idea for the cross community.

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    Quote Originally Posted by saukrateaz View Post
    It can be seen as similar to what Trek did with Domane, but I think the overall feel they are going for is quite different. Im not a fan of suspension, so I may be biased a bit. I like to feel the surface im riding on. Ive ridden a Domane and although I agree its a great ride, it felt to "soft" to me, for lack of a better description.
    This technology is a good idea for the cross community.
    I could see that as a legitimate concern for those of us (which is probably a significant number-myself included) that like a more racy connected feel. That kind of leads me back to second point though. Why did they fail to add the features that the people that are likely to be most interested in a bike like this will be looking for (discs and clearance for wider tires)? The way it stands right now, I personally don't think this bike does anything to knock the GT Grade off it's perch as the best adventure/rough road type bike on the market right now. That's still my favorite anyway and it's like 1/2 to 1/4 of the price depending on the set-up you get, but I know that isn't a concern or/ factor everyone thinks about.

    I am still a fan of the design for the most part, but I have to admit that it just feels like they had an opportunity to create the premier gravel race bike, but settled on creating a road race machine that a number serious racers/roadies are only going to laugh at.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  15. #15
    mrwirey
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    Where I live, chip seal is the closest thing most of us will ever come to riding on cobble stones.

    That said, the vast majority of road riders - me included - can achieve the same effect as the multi-million dollar Pinarello/Jaguar 'brain scientists' by letting a wee bit of air out of our overinflated tires and riding gingerly enough so as not to pinch flat (too often).

    But what do I know ... I comment on Interweb posts and ride a hardtail mountain bike.

    Very respectfully, Tim
    "Anything can be a torch if you set it on fire"

  16. #16
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    Pretty neat, and useful.

    And if you want the suspension attached to a titanium frame, you can get the Moots YBB.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    This bike is for two types of riders:

    A) pussies. (lost all respect for Team Sky)
    B) senior citizens pushing 90.
    Yea, smart people said the same thing about the "safety bicycle" (as opposed to the high wheel), pneumatic tires, gears, and padded shorts. *****, ah, nice thoughtful comment.... for a 15 year old.

    To me, if this can be done with little or no weight penalty and neutral or improvement on handling, what's not to like? Hey, bike technology changes over time and if a suspension can be done well on a road bike, it could not only improve comfort, but handling under certain conditions as well. Just like a MTB, just like any other vehicle in existence.

    I ride a no-suspension mountain bike from the 90s. I like the bike, but I will tell you for a fact, that when I ride with guys on suspension bikes, there are handling aspects, and comfort aspects that are superior with their bikes. People put up with the weight of a MTB suspension not only for the comfort.

    I kind of see this as a benefit of the 6.8 kg or whatever the minimum allowable racing bike weight is (15 lbs?). Even though most of us don't care after a certain point, it is fairly easy and not excessively expensive nowadays to make a bike lighter than that. Manufacturers don't have to put all their R&D into making that weight, and therefore are now doing R&D and marketing for other benefits of the ride (perceived or real).

    I don't think it's a coincidence that disc brakes and electronic shifting - both heavier than the excellent, time tested alternatives - are being developed in the past few years. They can put this stuff on the bike and still make that 15 pound benchmark. I don't think they'd be developing and marketing these things to roadies if they were struggling to "make weight".

    I'm actually more interested in seeing what a well designed lightweight suspension does to a road bike than I was ever interested in electronic shifting (kind of interested) or disc brakes (less interested). But with all three, I definitely think that trying to develop new effective technology is a good thing.
    Last edited by Camilo; 04-03-2015 at 09:58 AM.

  18. #18
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    Wow, welcome to 1980 MTB technology...They quit using elastomer shocks for a reason...

  19. #19
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    What I do not like about the design is that allowing the rear triangle to flex 10mm would change the distance between the crankset and cassette (granted, minimally). By having the seat tube flex and provide the "suspension" like on the Domane, the transmission triangle remains rigid and efficient. With a Domane when you stand to climb the suspension goes away and power is transferred with typical efficiency to the drive train. Pinarello's design more resembles a soft tail. It must loose some efficiency when someone stands to climb like, similar to a soft tail MTB.

    Granted some will buy the "name".

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    Cannondale introduced the scalpel mountain bike with that same chain stay design. Trek had the same elastomer setup on early domaines. What is a leading "Italian" brand to do except marry two old ideas and make a new $12,000 bicycle?

  21. #21
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    Over the cobbles, that bike will be quite a bit faster than a standard. The suspension will allow the rear wheel to track the road and keep the power going to the road in lieu of spinning.
    It will be tested soon.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Over the cobbles, that bike will be quite a bit faster than a standard. The suspension will allow the rear wheel to track the road and keep the power going to the road in lieu of spinning.
    It will be tested soon.
    I am not so sure about this. I really don't expect it to perform much better than the Domane does. My expectation is thay it will be super comfortable, but like everything else, that added comfort will come at the price of something else.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  23. #23
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    It seems the same purpose would be served with clearances for 38mm tires instead of suspension.
    Too old to ride plastic

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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    It seems the same purpose would be served with clearances for 38mm tires instead of suspension.
    For normal people, sure, but these guys are trying to win a bike race. There's a lot more road than cobble in Roubaix. 38c file tread tires would be great over the cobbles, but you'd get there with a lot fewer matchsticks.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Over the cobbles, that bike will be quite a bit faster than a standard. The suspension will allow the rear wheel to track the road and keep the power going to the road in lieu of spinning.
    It will be tested soon.
    Bingo, I was waiting for someone that actually understands how a suspension system works in the drive train long term before commenting.
    For those questioning the principle think wash board road and a fixed frame go kart vs a suspension frame go kart, the fixed frame is constantly loosing contact with the road while the other stays in contact. The Domane makes the rider more comfortable but doesn't do anything to improve power transfer, while the suspension system improves both (comfort and power transfer).
    As Campy 11 chains don't follow the 12 1/16" rule, it's wise to change them at 132.60 mm max.
    Lights and road riding - it's not about what you need to see, it's what it takes to be seen.

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