Spare derailleur hanger ?
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  1. #1
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    Spare derailleur hanger ?

    Hi guys, on behalf of my brother who's building up his first road bike, I was wondering if he should consider to get and even carry a spare derailleur hanger (like we do in our MTB), or if the chances of busting up your hanger on a road bike are rare to none ?

    The hanger is replaceable, but the frame as been painted after installation in the factory, which leads me to believe it's not often you get to replace an hanger on a road bike.

    I know it's better to always have a spare, but wanted to check with you guys to get more educated on the road side. Thanks

  2. #2
    Yea that's right.
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    Well, on the road there's not much to break a hanger on. If you do break one it's more often than not in some kind of crash, most of which on the road does not result in you putting all the pieces back together and continuing on.

    IMO


  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Hi guys, on behalf of my brother who's building up his first road bike, I was wondering if he should consider to get and even carry a spare derailleur hanger (like we do in our MTB), or if the chances of busting up your hanger on a road bike are rare to none ?

    The hanger is replaceable, but the frame as been painted after installation in the factory, which leads me to believe it's not often you get to replace an hanger on a road bike.

    I know it's better to always have a spare, but wanted to check with you guys to get more educated on the road side. Thanks
    Not very common to do. If you have no bail out/someone to come get you then maybe. Touring and long unsupported, yes.

    As a side not was on the phone and had a der hangar in my desk and a threaded Co2 cartridge, I was able to thread it in and in theory one could use it as a lever for roadside/trailside repair.

  4. #4
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    Generally, when you see a replaceable derailleur hanger on a road bike it's on an aluminum frame. Hangers on steel frames are typically not replaceable; they're part of the driveside dropout. If they get bent out of alignment, they're easily straightened with a Park Tool DAG-2.
    -Stan
    my bikes

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scooper View Post
    Generally, when you see a replaceable derailleur hanger on a road bike it's on an aluminum frame..
    Most carbon bikes come with a replaceable derailleur hanger.

    If your brother is doing club rides, fitness rides, etc. chances are he won't need to carry a replacement hanger with him. If you live in an area without a shop, etc. then getting a replacement to have on hand at home might be a good idea if you're that worried. If your brother travels a lot with the bike, then it might be idea to buy a replacement.

    If your brother races, he might want to get a replacement hanger and bring it to the races with him, especially multi day races where there is a road race in the morning, a TT in the afternoon, and a crit the next morning. Last year at one of the collegiate races one of the students crashed in the RR got back up and finished. His hanger was bent and the only way to make the bike shift was to lock out his 11, 12, and 13. With the TT coming up later that day and the crit the next morning, it wasn't a great option. Luckily we found a shop nearby that had a hanger in stock. I now recommend everyone in the collegiate club purchase and bring to the races a replacement hanger.

  6. #6
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    Get one for your tool box, while they are available, they are only a few bucks. The maker may have stopped making them already.

  7. #7
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    I have never had to replace a hanger on a road bike, though I did have to straighten one on a steel frame once. Good chance you'll never need it, but if it's cheap and adds peace of mind, then might as well.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by vagabondcyclist View Post
    Most carbon bikes come with a replaceable derailleur hanger.
    Oops! I wasn't even thinking about CF.
    -Stan
    my bikes

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinelli 82220 View Post
    Get one for your tool box, while they are available, they are only a few bucks. The maker may have stopped making them already.
    http://derailleurhanger.com

  10. #10
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    The best way to ensure that you don't need one is to get a spare.

  11. #11
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    I have an old titanium frame with a non-replaceable hanger. Does anybody know if titanium can be straightened like steel frames?

  12. #12
    Big is relative
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIL49 View Post
    I have an old titanium frame with a non-replaceable hanger. Does anybody know if titanium can be straightened like steel frames?
    Yes, let a framebuilder or an experienced mechanic do it.
    Retired sailor

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIL49 View Post
    I have an old titanium frame with a non-replaceable hanger. Does anybody know if titanium can be straightened like steel frames?
    In my knowledge, your derailleur will get busted long before your Ti dropout get a scratch. But like he said, leave it to a pro.

  14. #14
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    And the frame is a carbon/alloy mix. The dropouts are alloy.

    Ill probably get one and keep in in the shop. Or just taped it under the saddle or in the tool bag whatever so it's always with the bike and not in the way. Better have it and not need it than needing it and not having it.

    Thanks for all the infos guys

  15. #15
    old school drop out
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIL49 View Post
    I have an old titanium frame with a non-replaceable hanger. Does anybody know if titanium can be straightened like steel frames?
    Yes, ti can be straightened like steel.

    Aluminum hangers can also be straighted (just like steel) but they are much more easily re-bent afterward as they become much softer. If you bump into much of anything with a straightened aluminum hanger it will re-bend. It's not a great situation, but it works fine until a replacement hanger arrives.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by teoteoteo View Post
    Not very common to do. If you have no bail out/someone to come get you then maybe. .
    If you have a chain tool, you won't be stranded. Break the chain and bypass the derailleur so you have a single speed.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by stanseven View Post
    If you have a chain tool, you won't be stranded. Break the chain and bypass the derailleur so you have a single speed.
    Even better, just carry a spare hanger lol. Take less time to fix and no messing with chain and where to pack the rd and chain left-over.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by stanseven View Post
    If you have a chain tool, you won't be stranded. Break the chain and bypass the derailleur so you have a single speed.
    Did this just last weekend. Knowing I had a bunch of flat and downhill AFTER a big climb i left it at a 52/16 and just stood the whole way climbing. That sucked but made for a much more enjoyable 20 miles after the final climb. Mine was not the hanger but the derailleur hanger bolt on an older 105 set. Not sure how it broke as i was still on the flats when I shifted. Must have been weakened over the years (bike is a 93) Chaintool and SS negates the need to carry a hanger and works in both instances (broken hanger or broken der) so it makes more sense

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