Thoughts on upgrading to new bike
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  1. #1

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    Thoughts on upgrading to new bike

    I am contemplating upgrading to a higher end bike, but would like some feedback on whether it is worthwhile doing and what would be some good options.

    I have an Orbea Marmolada with Veloce components. I love the bike, but it is weighs about 21 lbs. built--it is an aluminum frame with carbon fork, chain stays, seat stays and seat post. I use it to commute and for fun in good weather, which in Seattle means about 4 months per year. My commute is 16-27 miles each way, depending on route). When I commute I carry a backpack.

    I am thinking about going to an all carbon frame if I can find an affordable bike that is in the 16-18 pound range fully built, with either Veloce, Ultegra/Ultegra SL, or SRAM Force. I've looked at the Trek Madone 5.2, and it looks like the right weight and specs, but the price is a bit steep. I haven't done research, but the Specialized Tarmac looks like a nice frame in my range. I've also thought about Cervelo, Giant OCR Carbon, and Orbea Orca.

    So my questions are:

    1. Are there any other bikes you might recommend that would fit my wish list?
    2. Is it worth the money to lose 4-5 pounds from a bike if I use it for a lot of commuting?
    3. Is it worth the money to buy a frameset and pay a bike shop to take the components from my Marmolada adn put them on the new frame, and then try to sell the Marmolada frameset on Craigslist?
    4. What would be a fair price to ask for either the Marmolada frameset itself, or the full Marmolada? (It is about 14 months old and has about 1200 miles, has new crankset and front derailleur and chain).

    Any assistance would be appreciated.
    [FONT="Arial"][/FONT]seattlesyclist

  2. #2
    haole from the mainland
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    My thoughts:

    Seems kinda crazy to go for a top-of-the line bike if its primary use is commuting. Why pay the price premium for the Orca, when there are versions of the Opal and Onix that meet your weight target for a lot less?

    A 54cm Marmolada listed on ebay recently failed to sell.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Orbea-Vuelta-Mar...QQcmdZViewItem

  3. #3

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    I think the Orca is out of my price range anyway.

    What I am hoping to do is buy a carbon frameset (of whatever brand seems best) and pay a bike shop to take all the components, etc. from my Marmolada and put them onto the new frame. Then I'd sell the Marmolada frame. The alternative would be to buy a complete bike.

    I looked at doing that with an Onix, but my LBS told me that Orbea no longer sells Onix framesets--they only sell "out of the box". The Onix comes with Mirage, which is a step down from my Veloce, so I would need to pay to switch out the Mirage for the Veloce and either sell the Marmolada with Mirage, or sell each separately.
    [FONT="Arial"][/FONT]seattlesyclist

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Hmmm...

    As a fellow Seattle rider, I would nudge you in the direction of 3 possible options.

    First option: Keep your current ride as your commuter/rain bike and splurge for a nice light bike that would bring a smile to your face whenever you rode it (yes, the new Madone 5.2 would be an excellent choice!)
    This way you keep your nice bike clean and nice, and still have something fairly speedy to ride during the rainy times.

    Second option: Sell the Orbea and pick up a new fancy rig that makes you happy. We are coming into our short "dry" spell, and you probably won't put too much wear on the new rig if you use it to commute with for the next several months (hopefully). When the nasty weather approaches this fall start shopping for a mid-level cyclo-cross bike to use as your new commuter (Kona Jake, Specialized Tri-cross, Redline Conquest, Trek, etc.)
    In my eyes these are the ideal commute rigs: room for fenders and 28-32c tires in the fall/winter/spring, and the brakes (either cantis or disc) are superior for wet-weather since you will change your pads less frequently. And hey, if you had a 'cross rig, it'd give you an excuse to check out our ever-growing 'cross scene!

    Third option: Sell the Orbea and pick up a high-end cross bike (maybe a Ridley carbon rig if you're absolutely sold on carbon) to use as a do-all bike. The high-end 'cross bikes can be built up in the 16-18 lb range with plenty of durability for your purposes.

    I would go ahead and buy a complete bike before going the frame-swap option because:
    1)Used frames don't normally bring that much $.
    2) Mainstream companies get such a price-break on parts that they can offer complete bikes for about the same $ as most people can buy the groups for.
    3) Complete bikes are easier to sell.

    Best of luck!
    I may be short but I sure am skinny.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    How much do you want to spend? How about this if it is the right size?

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...mp_campy08.htm

  6. #6

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    That is some good advice, especially about buying new vs. frameset only. That leaves me with two issues:

    1. What would be a good bike that would hold up to a Seattle good weather commute but still come in around 16-17 pounds?

    2. Which bike should I sell?

    I have a Trek Portland (road bike, disc brakes, 105 components). which is great for really bad weather, especially with the disc brakes, but is not nearly as much fun in good weather. But I would have a nice Orbea to commute with (tough it would wear the components down quickly) and an even nicer bike for good weather.

    (For what it is worth, I think the Trek is overpriced by about $500 from MSRP--the components are not worthy of a $1700 sticker price. I bought mine new for $1350 as a closeout on 2007 models.)

    Or I could sell the Orbea, which means I would spend most of my time riding the far less enjoyable Trek.
    [FONT="Arial"][/FONT]seattlesyclist

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Hmmm...

    You are revealing more of your stable! What else ya got hidden?

    I've never ridden the Portland, but on paper (screen) it appears to be an excellent commuter choice. I guess it depends on what you want. From what you expressed in your original post, it sounds like you desire a racier option that you can use for commuting part-time. I guess if it were me I would sell the Orbea and get a nice(r) road bike with the understanding that when the temp went south and the humidity went north you would be using the Portland for the slog.

    If you keep the Portland, maybe look into getting some lightweight wheels built to make the commute feel a bit zippier? The nice thing about disc brakes is that you can go with a pretty nice/light rim without worrying about grinding the sidewalls down in the winter.
    I may be short but I sure am skinny.

  8. #8
    sayhellotomylittlefriend
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    Commuting on a fancy carbon bike in NYC would last 1 day, 2 tops, but thats besides the point (right?)

    I dont think you'd feel the difference at the level you're discussing to justify the expense, especially on a cummuter and since you also wear a backpack. the difference between 21 lbs and 17 is not worth the added expense. That amount of weight savings will cost you a lot and won't be noticeable on commutes, and you'll lose the edge with a heavy backpack anyways. ARe you locking this bike up? On the street? Think of the abuse frames take locked to poles, slipping and sliding, dents, heavy chains scratching them, etc., Maybe thats just here in NYC...

    If you want a race bike or sexy afterwork-ride, then go for it and get the best thing you can.

    BUT get what FITS you best and not what is marketed to you best. Really, the difference between 15-16-17-18 lb bikes once you're riding is negligible (unless you're racing a criterium or climbing constantly) so go with geometry for your body type first and foremost.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Point taken.

    I guess I was projecting my current situation into my recommendations. I'm able to store my bike in my classroom. I won't take a job that makes me leave my bike outside. That would be outright betrayal.
    I may be short but I sure am skinny.

  10. #10

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    The more read your responses ad think about it the more I think I know what I'm looking for. I think I need to keep the Trek for the disc brfakes--and because its June in Seattle and I still need my rain gear.

    For the good weather months, I want a bike that is sturdy enough for a 20+mile commute with backpack, racy enough to fly on pleasure rides when I am unencumbered by a backpack.

    So I think it boils down to keeping the 21.5 pound Orbea Marmolada and giving up some of the real racy feel on summer rides, or selling it and buying a bike that flies when I'm not commuting.

    Either way, I have some nasty hill climbs to get home from pleasure rides, so I need a good climbing bike. That's why I am trying to get a handle on whether it is worth paying for a 3-5 pound difference for climbing power on pleasure rides.

    As for my New York friend, I'm a former Jersey-ite. But I park my bike in a locked key-card access only bike garage that is video-surveilled 24-7. I also bought the strongest Krptoite New York "Forgetaboutit" lock, so theft is not really anissue

    Given all that, what are some good all-carbon frames that weigt 15-16 pounds built with higher end components (Shimano Ultegra or Ultegra SL, SRAM Rival or Force, or Campy Centaur or Chorus)? I am thinking of a price range of $2200-$3200, possibly a little more depending on how much I can get for my Marmolada.
    [FONT="Arial"][/FONT]seattlesyclist

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