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  1. #1
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    Threaded bottom brackets in 2018

    Hello,

    has someone made observations of 2018 model bikes, that have previously had press-fit bottom brackets, to be now available with a BSA shell instead?

    As I was happy to discover on the MTB front, Specialized had made alloy/carbon Epic's with a threaded bb for 2018 (maybe except the S-Works model).

    Also please note, that I'm not asking for discussion of threaded vs press-fit. Just wish to know if someone has spotted a change from the previous models.

  2. #2
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssio View Post
    .....
    Also please note, that I'm not asking for discussion of threaded vs press-fit. ......
    You're new here, so you probably didn't realize that by post #3 on this thread that's exactly what it will become.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssio View Post
    Hello,

    has someone made observations of 2018 model bikes, that have previously had press-fit bottom brackets, to be now available with a BSA shell instead?

    As I was happy to discover on the MTB front, Specialized had made alloy/carbon Epic's with a threaded bb for 2018 (maybe except the S-Works model).

    Also please note, that I'm not asking for discussion of threaded vs press-fit. Just let wish to know if someone has spotted a change from the previous models.
    Specialized Roubaix from Expert model to below is now threaded bottom bracket per below article:
    Is pressfit dead? road.cc investigates and speaks to Specialized and Bowman Cycles | road.cc

    Pinerellos and Bianchi Intenso are other carbon frames that have threaded bottom brackets in 2018.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ra21benj View Post
    Specialized Roubaix from Expert model to below is now threaded bottom bracket per below article:
    Is pressfit dead? road.cc investigates and speaks to Specialized and Bowman Cycles | road.cc

    Pinerellos and Bianchi Intenso are other carbon frames that have threaded bottom brackets in 2018.
    Pressfit R.I.P.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ra21benj View Post
    Specialized Roubaix from Expert model to below is now threaded bottom bracket per below article:
    Is pressfit dead? road.cc investigates and speaks to Specialized and Bowman Cycles | road.cc

    Pinerellos and Bianchi Intenso are other carbon frames that have threaded bottom brackets in 2018.
    Oh yes, the Roubaix. I'm actually currently riding the SL4 model, but I've had 2 of the earlier models prior to that, so I could try some other bikes too.

    Intenso is something I shall investigate, thanks for the tip!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssio View Post
    Oh yes, the Roubaix. I'm actually currently riding the SL4 model, but I've had 2 of the earlier models prior to that, so I could try some other bikes too.

    Intenso is something I shall investigate, thanks for the tip!
    Iím 5í9Ē and ride size 53 Bianchi Intenso. Intenso rides smooth because of Kevlar in the fork and seat stays. Head tube isnít too long for an endurance frame, so you can get your stem low if you want to be more aero. Great looking bike with a BSA threaded bottom bracket.

  7. #7
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    My 2017 Specialized Sequoia has a threaded bottom bracket. I wouldnít have bought it otherwise!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ra21benj View Post
    Iím 5í9Ē and ride size 53 Bianchi Intenso. Intenso rides smooth because of Kevlar in the fork and seat stays. Head tube isnít too long for an endurance frame, so you can get your stem low if you want to be more aero. Great looking bike with a BSA threaded bottom bracket.
    Fwiw, the Intenso's head tube is very long, and now that Bianchi is requiring 5mm of spacers above and below the stem, it is very difficult to get your position low on your right-size frame.

  9. #9
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    Bring back external gear cable routing as well. Specially for mechanical bikes.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notvintage View Post
    Bring back external gear cable routing as well. Specially for mechanical bikes.
    +1... we sound like Luddites but this should make sense to anyone who services their own bike(s) as well as bike mechanics.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Fwiw, the Intenso's head tube is very long, and now that Bianchi is requiring 5mm of spacers above and below the stem, it is very difficult to get your position low on your right-size frame.
    From the below review, the Bianchi Intenso has semi-endurance geometry with a slightly taller headtube:
    https://www.bikeradar.com/us/road/gear/category/bikes/road/product/review-bianchi-intenso-14-48144/

    I also have a Gt Corsa Two (medium) endurance bike with no spacers below stem, 9mm Cane Creek top cover, and -17 degree 100 mm stem.
    To get the same handlebar height on the Bianchi Intenso , I would still have three to four 5mm spacers below the stem, a tall 15mm upper bearing top cover, and -10 degree 100 mm stem.

  12. #12
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    I can tell you that my 59 has a 200mm head tube. That's awful upright. The rest of the dimensions matched the three 59s that it replaced.

    It was o.k. when I could slam the stem to the FSA headset top cap, but with Bianchi's warning, I am higher up then ever before.

  13. #13
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    If we'd extend this to newly announced 2019 bike models, has anyone caught manufacturers who'd be switching over some bike models to threaded bb's? I haven't managed to find new ones, but there must be something I've missed. Or at least I'm hopeful.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssio View Post
    If we'd extend this to newly announced 2019 bike models, has anyone caught manufacturers who'd be switching over some bike models to threaded bb's? I haven't managed to find new ones, but there must be something I've missed. Or at least I'm hopeful.
    Might consider looking at steel bikes.

    The article on road.cc says threaded BBs work best in steel frames, metal to metal, fully adjustable manually. If they're heavier, its in the best place for added weight, down low in the center of gravity. So the bike will ride as nice as the lighter, "stiffer" BB30s.

    Flex is not an issue with the threaded BB design so much as the BB shell. That's probably why makers put threaded BBs on the lower end bikes. They're not going to present a problem 5 years down the line.

  15. #15
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    If your'e looking for a high end production threaded road bike the only model that comes to mind is Pinarello's dogma

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by terbennett View Post
    +1... we sound like Luddites but this should make sense to anyone who services their own bike(s) as well as bike mechanics.
    True. But if the sequence was reversed and press-fit and internal was the standard for decades you'd sound like a genius if you 'invented' external routing and screw in BBs.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Might consider looking at steel bikes.
    Absolutely! Just today, I was looking at this:

    road.cc article "19 of the best steel road bikes and frames"

    Some really juicy stuff out there. Funnily, those Bombtrack bikes actually have pressfit BB's. The road.cc review of Bombtrack Hook EXT mentions "Bombtrack claims 'great success' with PF30 in its steel frames, not suffering the possibility of creaking that carbon does." Who knows where this is a quote from.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssio View Post
    Absolutely! Just today, I was looking at this:

    road.cc article "19 of the best steel road bikes and frames"

    Some really juicy stuff out there. Funnily, those Bombtrack bikes actually have pressfit BB's. The road.cc review of Bombtrack Hook EXT mentions "Bombtrack claims 'great success' with PF30 in its steel frames, not suffering the possibility of creaking that carbon does." Who knows where this is a quote from.
    Not much of a weight penalty in modern steel(please lets leave it at that). I would consider too

  19. #19
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    Happy to discover that on the gravel grinders front, the brand new Cannondale Topstone bikes have a threaded BB. So perhaps the future is indeed starting to look a bit brighter.

  20. #20
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    pursuit produced their first frame this year, threaded BB.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Might consider looking at steel bikes.

    The article on road.cc says threaded BBs work best in steel frames, metal to metal, fully adjustable manually. If they're heavier, its in the best place for added weight, down low in the center of gravity. So the bike will ride as nice as the lighter, "stiffer" BB30s.

    Flex is not an issue with the threaded BB design so much as the BB shell. That's probably why makers put threaded BBs on the lower end bikes. They're not going to present a problem 5 years down the line.
    Allied just does BSA

    https://alliedcycleworks.com/pages/allied-alfa-allroad

    BOTTOM BRACKET
    After more than a decade of changing bottom bracket standards, we are happily back to BSA. No more creaking, easy to service and just as light as any other bottom bracket standard. Your mechanic will be thankful.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notvintage View Post
    Bring back external gear cable routing as well. Specially for mechanical bikes.
    Made me think of this spotted at the Moots factory

    https://cyclingtips.com/2018/08/tech...-factory-tour/


  23. #23
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    For carbon, It's cheaper for the asian factories to glue a bsa insert in a frame than it is to make a PF shell that meets the tight min/max diameter spec required. That's why the big companies are going back.
    I know a guy that has owned a specialized dealer for over 20 years. He has told me they have received many S works frames that they could push BBs into with hand pressure alone.

    Custom steel and ti builders will all be doing T47 soon enough. It gives you more area to weld to and accepts virtually any crank. There's no downside to it.
    Last edited by 92gli; 08-30-2018 at 09:54 AM.

  24. #24
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    I think consumers wised up to PF BBs about two years ago. The average enthusiast now knows that they need to at least understand what kind of BB they're getting. However, I (sadly) don't think we're quite at the point where people are making buying decisions based on the BB a bike uses. I'll believe PF is dead when Trek finally moves off of BB90/95. That design is particularly awful. Even with newer Madones/Emondas/Domanes, you seem to get 3-5K miles before the bearings need to be professionally replaced. That's absurd.

  25. #25
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    I have an alloy Spooky that's my backup bike that my 24 year old son rides. He lays down a lot of power and it has a threaded BB, it's reliable as can be.

    My Felt F frame has a BB30 and is currently on a Praxis crankset that's quiet, but the FSA before that was very noisy.

    I prefer the threaded BB, it's much easier to work with and once correctly installed, worry free.

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