What bikes brands are made in China?
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  1. #1
    papa sboak
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    What bikes brands are made in China?

    based on another thread,

    What bike brands are made in China?
    Ron Paul 2012

    America needs change. Not more of the same.

  2. #2
    Slowpoke
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    If you include Taiwan - most of them.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Thumbs up For what it's worth....

    I read an article about 7 or 8 years ago that stated that unless a bike cost over the 3 or 4 thousand dollar (IIRC) mark, the frame was made in either China or Tiawan. Many in the same factory. The article went on to explain that there was a limited amount of factories to produce all the various bike frames. This is from memory and unfortunately, I don't remember the source.

    Doug

  4. #4
    banned
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    All the bikes that aren't made outside of China are made in China.

  5. #5
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    Yours



    Issues like this make me glad I own a Cannondale

  6. #6
    duh...
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddonner
    I read an article about 7 or 8 years ago that stated that unless a bike cost over the 3 or 4 thousand dollar (IIRC) mark, the frame was made in either China or Tiawan. Many in the same factory. The article went on to explain that there was a limited amount of factories to produce all the various bike frames. This is from memory and unfortunately, I don't remember the source.

    Doug


    not surprising, although it would obviously have to be non-customs <3-4k

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    you don't need to include Taiwan to get most of them. 94% of bikes imported into the US come from China. Taiwan exports 4.5M bikes/year, China 53.5M (China also supplies most of the CF to Taiwan)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath


    Issues like this make me glad I own a Cannondale
    Even the flag wavers at Cannondale use China on the Synapse carbon models.

  9. #9
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    An interesting article on where bikes are "made".

    http://allanti.com/page.cfm?PageID=328

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by teoteoteo
    Even the flag wavers at Cannondale use China on the Synapse carbon models.
    Its a CAAD4






    Oh, and I was being facetious

  11. #11
    Ride The Lightning
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    Quote Originally Posted by Addicted
    An interesting article on where bikes are "made".

    http://allanti.com/page.cfm?PageID=328
    People should have this link ready to paste because this question comes up all the time.

    I have a "RC" labeled Bianchi, and yes, was a little disappointed to know that my "handmade in Italy" sticker may be meaningless. BUT the bike still rides like a dream, however, it's a bit disingenuous to have some Bianchi frames labeled from Taiwan and some made in Italy, when they know full well the difference is minor (assembled in Italy? handpainted in Italy?).

    Not a big deal, but I also don't like being treated dishonestly - don't slap the "italy" sticker on it if it doesn't deserve it.

  12. #12
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    Define "bike" and define "made".

  13. #13
    Ride The Lightning
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    Define "bike" and define "made".
    I'll take a stab. When the average consumer sees a complete bike with a label on the frame that says "Made in U.S.A.", they should be able to reasonably assume the following:
    1. The frame itself (where the sticker was placed) was welded and painted in the U.S.A., however, this frame doesn't have to include the fork as arguably, the fork may have a different sticker (made in Taiwan), however, if the fork does NOT have a sticker, than the frame and fork must be manufactured in the U.S. The tubes themselves may be sourced from China, as long as the frame itself is welded/molded in the U.S.A. In other words, wherever that sticker is placed, that item itself has to at least be made in the U.S.A.
    2. The second implication is that the bike was ALSO assembled in U.S.A. If there is no other sticker that says assembled in Mexico/Canada/etc., then the consumer should be allowed to expect that not only was the frame made in the U.S.A. but the entire bike was assembled in the U.S.A. If the bike was assembled elsewhere, then place another sticker attesting to that distinction.
    3. Or, if the bike is a mishmash of parts none of which is made in the U.S., then a sticker can say something like: "Assembled in U.S.A."

    Unfortunately, without clear labeling guidelines, marketers can take advantage of ambiguity to mislead consumer expectations.

    Car manufacturers have stickers that says show what % parts are from U.S. and where the car was assembled as well. But unlike cars, bikes are highly customizable, so most often you buy the bike for the frame because you end up replacing the other components anyway. Thus labeling accuracy should have the most bearing on the frame. Where a bike says "made in U.S.A." on the frame the following are possible inaccuracies, but only one would be acceptable I believe:
    1. Frame manufactured in U.S.A. from foreign tubing, and assembled elsewhere with components including fork from elsewhere. Acceptable as long as at least the frame is made in the U.S., because that is where the sticker is placed.
    2. Frame assembled in U.S.A. from all foreign components/frame. Not acceptable, must say "assembled in U.S.A." not "made".
    3. Assembled in U.S.A. and fork made in U.S.A., but nothing else. Not acceptable.

    I place a strong distinction between "made" and "assembled", and these terms should be used accurately.

  14. #14
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    I doubt that the average consumer wouldn't read through everything you just posted, much less care about the distinctions you are drawing.

    Trying to define where an entire bike is manufactured and/or assembled is nonsensical in this day and age. The best you could do is label each component with the country where it was manufactured, but even then you have ambiguities, especially with finishing and paint.

    Which is why this whole issue is a big waste of time, IMO. Judge a product based on the company's track record and/or warantee. Leave the countries of origin out of it. The don't mean squat anyway unless you believe that intelligence, skill and integrity are linked to nationality.

  15. #15
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    I have observed recently that some brands of aluminum and steel bike frames that were formerly made in Taiwan are now made in China,with an obvious decline in weld and paint quality.The all carbon frames often are made in China by Taiwan based manufacturers,but seem to maintain a high standard of quality.It is often difficult to tell which factory is making a carbon frame for a big name brand.The high end names are playing a game of re-branding and re-painting Taiwan/Chinese carbon frames and selling them at huge mark-ups to status conscious consumers who could buy the same or very similar frame re-badged by a lower markup/less middlemen/less marketing cost/less warranty back-up internet based company.The European manufacturers have become very slick at concealing the true origin of their frames as well as forks and components.Some European countries have very weak labeling laws and it is tough to determine where anything,especially clothing is made.It is fun but often difficult to figure out which Taiwan/Chinese frames/forks are the true low mark-up bargains versus the highly marked up/re-branded big name brands.The issue is not a waste of time for me when hundreds or even thousands of dollars in excess mark-up costs can be saved.I also feel much better riding a nice $600 carbon frame than worrying over a $2500 frame with a high-zoot name that could become toast in a fairly minor crash or mishap that lands you in the ditch.
    Last edited by jordan; 07-06-2007 at 12:13 PM.

  16. #16
    Ride The Lightning
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    I doubt that the average consumer wouldn't read through everything you just posted, much less care about the distinctions you are drawing.

    Trying to define where an entire bike is manufactured and/or assembled is nonsensical in this day and age. The best you could do is label each component with the country where it was manufactured, but even then you have ambiguities, especially with finishing and paint.

    Which is why this whole issue is a big waste of time, IMO. Judge a product based on the company's track record and/or warantee. Leave the countries of origin out of it. The don't mean squat anyway unless you believe that intelligence, skill and integrity are linked to nationality.
    Your point makes sense in theory, but why then do bike salespeople make a big point of emphasizing that their bike is "made in Italy" or "100% made in the U.S.A." unless that statement had an influence on the buyer? Last year my LBS Trek dealer tried to sell my wife a Pilot and kept emphasizing how Trek is made in the U.S.A., until I pointed out that the label on the Pilot actually said Made in Taiwan - in his embarrassment he stuttered that they only recently moved production to Asia.

    Obviously, to a sophisticated biker who peruses these forums, he is knowledgeable enough that country of origin is irrelevant, but the first time bike buyer will be impressed by the "made in Italy" label over the "made in Taiwan" label.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kung Fu Felice
    Obviously, to a sophisticated biker who peruses these forums, he is knowledgeable enough that country of origin is irrelevant, but the first time bike buyer will be impressed by the "made in Italy" label over the "made in Taiwan" label.
    My point is that country of origin should be irrelevent to everyone. Obviously, retailers will do anything they can (within the law) to trade on bias towards US/European manufacturing over Asian manufactuing, but the bias itself is the fault of uninformed consumers. Caveat emptor.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Plus bike salespeople "say", they don't expect an American consumer to actually "read" anything. That would require literacy, interest and personal responsibility, all of which would preclude listening to anything an LBS employee had to say in the first place.

    "Made" is really a far more complicated term than people realize. Even with a pencil it's very hard to say where it's made since every component is from a different part of the world. But that doesn't keep US congressmen and regulators from claiming the expertise to do so. Gosh they're smart.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Some conscientious consumers do not regard country of origin as irrelevant. It is not just about quality and value.

    Chinese manufacturing is unabashedly polluting and energy-intensive. Many asian factory workers live and work in disgusting conditions. Someone who buys a bike made in the USA, France or Italy could hope that it was made in a safe workplace by people earning fair pay.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by raghead
    Someone who buys a bike made in the USA, France or Italy could hope that it was made in a safe workplace by people earning fair pay.
    They might hope that but the point of this thread is that such hopes are naive. Few, if any, such bikes are available.

  21. #21
    Visitor from the 80's
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    They might hope that but the point of this thread is that such hopes are naive. Few, if any, such bikes are available.
    A custom bike would address the concerns! Unfortunately, not everybody has (or wants to spend) the $$ for even an entry level custom bike.

  22. #22
    Juanmoretime
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    Talking

    My Titus Solera is made here right in Tempe, Arizona!
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juanmoretime
    My Titus Solera is made here right in Tempe, Arizona!
    where did the carbon come tubes from ???
    lighter is better

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sevencycle
    where did the carbon come tubes from ???
    And where did everything other than the frame come from?

    "Made" in Tempe, Arizona from imported components.

  25. #25
    Juanmoretime
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    Quote Originally Posted by sevencycle
    where did the carbon come tubes from ???
    Solera is made from American titanium tubes! No carbon.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

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