Zurich/Corum comparison
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Crankist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    408

    Zurich/Corum comparison

    A quick comparison of the 853 LeMond Zurich to the EOM 16.5 De Rosa Corum follows.

    2001 LeMond Zurich: Ultegra/DA brifters with CK/OP/ Revo/32 3X.

    2003 De Rosa Corum: Chorus with Record/OP/Revo/32 3X. It comes in about a pound lighter @ 18.5 lbs.

    I have over 100 rides on the Corum, a few hundred plus rides on the Zurich and so feel qualified to make a few observations. There both on very similar wheelsets, and for a span of months both were rolling on Pro Races. I rode the Zurich for 2-3 years, loved it and still hop on it to pound out bigger miles, and for a change of pace. After owning the Zurich for a while I wondered if there was really any steel out there that was a better value and a better overall rider, so I bought the Corum. This comparison I guess, is for those steel owners who want to know what might be gained by going to a high-end steel frame.

    First, I'm impressed with the stiffness of the De Rosa. I don?t know how the heck I can flick the toptube with a fingernail, hear a hollow 'tink', and then hop on a stiff bike. I make no claims as a Herculean sprinter, topping out @ 35. But from what I can tell it is one hell of a good sprinter that remains stable throughout. My first sprint felt like the bike was about squirt out from underneath, no kidding -I'never forget that sensation - it felt that much better.
    In my version of a sprint the Zurich has no 'pop'. It feels quite a bit flexier, as if energy is being lost. But really it's probably not the case; I lose only about 1 or 2 mph on the top in comparison and I'm at a loss to explain that-unless 1 to 2 mph is big. Ditto up the hills; there's a tablespoon of oatmeal in the Zurich. I wouldn't say it's sluggish, just a lower scoot factor.

    It'll be no surprise to anyone that the Zurich is the better all-day bike. I'm forever thinking 'Cadillac' as I roll over the bumps on it. It's stable. It's steady. It's like some old butler always ready with the pate and a napkin. And I guess that's my main complaint against the bike. I don't want to get too esoteric here, but as a confirmed subjectivist I'll go this far: there ain't no spark either. It'll take a good line through the corners, but I have to steer. That is, I'm turning the bars a little on any turn at any normal speed to take that line. This is no problem for someone who has grown used to it as I did. But it was a heck of a leap to the Corum. For a couple of days I disliked the way the Corum cornered. I kept steering the damn thing. But from the moment a small light went on and I committed to purely leaning that bike, I've had one hell of a sporty road machine. So here we are at the passage where we all dig deep for superlatives describing handling. Mine is: it 'carves' a corner if you let it. That makes riding much more exciting, it helps give this bike life. Sorry, the Zurich got crushed here, I tried it, it just doesn't get there. I?m tempted to sum up handling differences thusly: sport/touring geometry versus racing geometry, and that may be all there is to it. Yet the Corum is at least the equal in stability - it's definitely a more confident descender. And if I cheat the tire pressure by a few psi it rides about as smoothly as the Zurich.

    Although the Zurich is well-finished, and the paint is holding up well, fit 'n' finish hands down goes to the Corum. Flawless weld beads and sexy paint are stock items on the De Rosas I've seen.

    The Zurich is a darn good bike, but it's not a great bike. For my money, at twice the price I got immeasurably more in the Corum.

    And incidentally, my conversion to Campy is absolute.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Zurich/Corum comparison-1-512-cz.jpg  
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by Crankist; 01-30-2005 at 02:09 PM.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: rriddle3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    232
    So you're willing to dump that miserable old slug of a Zurich for how much? (Provided it's a 53cm) ;)
    When trouble comes lookin' for me...I'm mighty hard to find!

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    187

    Campy!

    Quote Originally Posted by Crankist
    A quick comparison of the 853 LeMond Zurich to the EOM 16.5 De Rosa Corum follows.

    2001 LeMond Zurich: Ultegra/DA brifters with CK/OP/ Revo/32 3X.

    2003 De Rosa Corum: Chorus with Record/OP/Revo/32 3X. It comes in about a pound lighter @ 18.5 lbs.

    I have over 100 rides on the Corum, a few hundred plus rides on the Zurich and so feel qualified to make a few observations. There both on very similar wheelsets, and for a span of months both were rolling on Pro Races. I rode the Zurich for 2-3 years, loved it and still hop on it to pound out bigger miles, and for a change of pace. After owning the Zurich for a while I wondered if there was really any steel out there that was a better value and a better overall rider, so I bought the Corum. This comparison I guess, is for those steel owners who want to know what might be gained by going to a high-end steel frame.

    First, I'm impressed with the stiffness of the De Rosa. I don?t know how the heck I can flick the toptube with a fingernail, hear a hollow 'tink', and then hop on a stiff bike. I make no claims as a Herculean sprinter, topping out @ 35. But from what I can tell it is one hell of a good sprinter that remains stable throughout. My first sprint felt like the bike was about squirt out from underneath, no kidding -I'never forget that sensation - it felt that much better.
    In my version of a sprint the Zurich has no 'pop'. It feels quite a bit flexier, as if energy is being lost. But really it's probably not the case; I lose only about 1 or 2 mph on the top in comparison and I'm at a loss to explain that-unless 1 to 2 mph is big. Ditto up the hills; there's a tablespoon of oatmeal in the Zurich. I wouldn't say it's sluggish, just a lower scoot factor.

    It'll be no surprise to anyone that the Zurich is the better all-day bike. I'm forever thinking 'Cadillac' as I roll over the bumps on it. It's stable. It's steady. It's like some old butler always ready with the pate and a napkin. And I guess that's my main complaint against the bike. I don't want to get too esoteric here, but as a confirmed subjectivist I'll go this far: there ain't no spark either. It'll take a good line through the corners, but I have to steer. That is, I'm turning the bars a little on any turn at any normal speed to take that line. This is no problem for someone who has grown used to it as I did. But it was a heck of a leap to the Corum. For a couple of days I disliked the way the Corum cornered. I kept steering the damn thing. But from the moment a small light went on and I committed to purely leaning that bike, I've had one hell of a sporty road machine. So here we are at the passage where we all dig deep for superlatives describing handling. Mine is: it 'carves' a corner if you let it. That makes riding much more exciting, it helps give this bike life. Sorry, the Zurich got crushed here, I tried it, it just doesn't get there. I?m tempted to sum up handling differences thusly: sport/touring geometry versus racing geometry, and that may be all there is to it. Yet the Corum is at least the equal in stability - it's definitely a more confident descender. And if I cheat the tire pressure by a few psi it rides about as smoothly as the Zurich.

    Although the Zurich is well-finished, and the paint is holding up well, fit 'n' finish hands down goes to the Corum. Flawless weld beads and sexy paint are stock items on the De Rosas I've seen.

    The Zurich is a darn good bike, but it's not a great bike. For my money, at twice the price I got immeasurably more in the Corum.

    And incidentally, my conversion to Campy is absolute.
    Campy always makes a bike better. I bet if you swapped the parts, the Zurich would be better.

Similar Threads

  1. Group comparison chart?
    By summerville in forum Campagnolo
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-05-2004, 08:31 AM
  2. Side by side comparison: Safety Equipment, mirrors
    By ARP in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-11-2004, 04:49 AM
  3. Sequoia Century Route comparison ?
    By hdnoise in forum Northern California
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-01-2004, 11:11 AM
  4. Real World Wheel Comparison
    By Sympatico in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 05-19-2004, 09:19 PM
  5. Bike Comparison
    By rubendc19 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-10-2004, 11:22 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.