Vintage Chorus Bottom Bracket
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  1. #1
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    Vintage Chorus Bottom Bracket

    I have a vintage Chorus crankset. I don't know the year but it looks like it would be from the 7-8 speed era. The only markings on the crank are: BV 175 62 (inside a box) 9/12"x20. It is a double crank. My question is, what length bottom bracket spindle would work? Also, would a newer modern Chrous bottom bracket work?

    'Hanx in advance.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP
    I have a vintage Chorus crankset. I don't know the year but it looks like it would be from the 7-8 speed era. The only markings on the crank are: BV 175 62 (inside a box) 9/12"x20. It is a double crank. My question is, what length bottom bracket spindle would work? Also, would a newer modern Chrous bottom bracket work?

    'Hanx in advance.
    Since it's introduction, the Chorus group has used at least 4 different double cranks which used two different lengths for BB spindles - the original 111mm was used for the first two designs until the late '90s, and a 102 mm spindle has been used for the latest set of designs. Both use the same taper. The switch from 111 mm to 102 mm was roughly at the same time as 9spd was introduced (1997). Is the word "Chorus" printed anywhere on the cranks? If not, then it is one of the first two designs, and uses the 111 mm spindle.

    The current 102 mm Chorus BB for double cranks would shift the arms and the charinrings 4.5 mm inwards (and decrease the Q distance between pedals by 9mm). The resulting chainline would be less ideal, and result in more rubbing of the chain when in the small chainring and the small sprockets. Depending on the frame, the arms and/or the inner chainring migh actually contact the chainstay.

    The current 111 mm Chorus BB for triple cranks could be used, but this BB is assymetrical, so the cranks would be shifted to the right slightly.

    Probably the best bet is the 111 mm Centaur BB for double cranks, which would position the cranks as they were originally intended.
    Last edited by Mark McM; 08-03-2005 at 05:52 AM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Mark McM

    Thanks Mark Mcm,
    The word Chorus does not appear anywhere on the cranks. From your description it sounds like I have an earlier crankset (111m). It kind of looks like an Athena model. I'll check my favorite LBS to see if they carry a Centar bottom bracket. Thanks again for your time and information!

    Jae

  4. #4
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    More Chorus history trivia

    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP
    Thanks Mark Mcm,
    The word Chorus does not appear anywhere on the cranks. From your description it sounds like I have an earlier crankset (111m). It kind of looks like an Athena model.
    That sounds like it might be the first generation Chorus crank. The defining feature of this crank is that on the right crank, the pedal arm swoops down to merge with the spider before it reaches the bolt hole, and there is an upraised shallow "cone" surrounding around the bolt hole, with matching upraised shallow cone on the left side as well (sorry if this discription isn't clear).

    The first generation of Chorus was released at the same time as the Croce d'Aune and first generation Athena groups. The Croce d'Aune group was a failure (both technically and commercially), and quickly disappeared. But some of the better Croce d'Aune components were kept, and added to the Chorus group. This included the cranks. The original Chorus crank was then moved down the Athena group (the only difference being that when it became Athena, the skimped a little on buffing the gloss finish on the back of the crank).

    If this is indeed the crank, then it was designed to work with a 111 mm BB.

  5. #5
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    Croce d'Aune

    You're right about the swooping shape of the crank. When I pulled the left side crank out of the box I thought it was severly bent. It's funny that you mentioned Croce d'Aune. I always loved the rear derailleur. It reminds me of the old Mavic rear derailleur. I'm still toying with the idea of outfitting my project with Croce d'Aune. What do you think of their "Delta" type calipers?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP
    What do you think of their "Delta" type calipers?
    Pretty much the same as everyone thought of them. Unique design, nice looking, really flows with the shape of the frame, heavy, difficult to adjust, poor modulation. When Deltas were used in Campagno's two top groups (Record and Croce d'Aune), many racing teams opted to use the Chorus (single pivot) brakes instead.

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