Ideal frame for cycling in Ontario
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  1. #1
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    Ideal frame for cycling in Ontario

    Just soliciting opinions of riders in Ontario. What do you feel is the ideal framset for fast paced riding in the Southern Ontario country side and why? Lightweight climber frame? Fast aero frame? Comfy classics frame?

    Let me know your thoughts. Let's keep the budget under $3500.

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    One that fits you...

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mspeak View Post
    Just soliciting opinions of riders in Ontario. What do you feel is the ideal framset for fast paced riding in the Southern Ontario country side and why? Lightweight climber frame? Fast aero frame? Comfy classics frame?

    Let me know your thoughts. Let's keep the budget under $3500.
    That's a little like asking what is better, chocolate or vanilla?

    I ride back roads north and north west of Toronto (Vaughan/King/Caledon areas), and the roads are a mixed bag, and since I am old and slow, I picked the Specialized Roubaix CF to give me a plush ride over harsh pavement. But then, I don't race, so for me, riding comfort trumps speed.

  4. #4
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    Kinda depends if you like hills? Stiffness? Comfort?
    Gotta echo above. Whatever fits. I ride a CAAD9 around Toronto and West of. Does me pretty well.

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    Lets assume the bike fits and I like to ride as fast a possible. I typically ride in and around the escarpment but take my bike to Florida in the winter where it is dead flat.

    My problem is that test riding bikes on demo days or loaning from a bike shop just is not enough time to get good enough feedback to make a decision.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mspeak View Post
    Lets assume the bike fits and I like to ride as fast a possible. I typically ride in and around the escarpment but take my bike to Florida in the winter where it is dead flat.

    My problem is that test riding bikes on demo days or loaning from a bike shop just is not enough time to get good enough feedback to make a decision.
    I guess what people are reacting to is the fact that the region of Ontario doesn't require a specific bike. Just get one you like that fits you well at a price you can afford.
    If you have questions about specific bikes people will be more helpful in that regard.

    Best of luck.

  7. #7
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    how fast? for 40+km/hr get an aero bike/outfit

    if you ride slower, any bike will do.

  8. #8
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    Regions that see a lot of rainfall are probably not the best suited for a steel frame so it does make some sense to consider frame material based on where you live. Ontario isn't a place of extremes, at least not during any time of the year that you'd actually ride your bike.

  9. #9
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    Fit is the most important. If you're spending ~$3000, go with a shop that has a fitting system and knows the importance of it. A shop with argon 18 fit bike will do nicely. start there and then get the most bike you can for your money. If you're deciding leaves with 2 or more bike to choose from, go with the one with better wheels.

    I'm a bit of a pov with a single income family and 2 girls to support, so I had to buy used, but I went through 3 bikes before I found my perfect fit bike.

    If you have the luxury of buying new, mid to high end bike, take advantage of the services your reputable high end shop offers.

  10. #10
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    i think your question is a little crazy. it all depends on the riding that you do

  11. #11
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    I don't think this question is crazy at all. The original post states i do fast paced riding in the southern ontario country side. If you reside or have ridden in Southern Ontario then you would know that the terrain is diverse. It ranges from flat to punchy short climbs to frost heaved roads to windy rolling farm land. Therefore, given the breadth of terrain in the region, I was interested in hearing the opinions of others and why.

    Most bike shops in the Golden Horseshoe area will not let you take the amount of time necessary to effectively evaluate a bike. They will try to sell you on their "expert" fitting systems but won't let you take a bike for a long 4 plus hour ride with your choice of wheels, tires and cassette.

    Bike shop fitting services are over rated. THis is a sell tactic reserved for the cubby middle aged men with little to no riding experience that are unable to adjust a bike themselves. I've been riding bikes for years and understand the dimensions I need for a comfortable and efficient ride. So lets take this out of the equation.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mspeak View Post
    Bike shop fitting services are over rated. THis is a sell tactic reserved for the cubby middle aged men with little to no riding experience that are unable to adjust a bike themselves.
    Maybe in your end of Ontario but in my city most cycle shops offer excellent fitting services for the novice to the seasoned pro. Tweeking will always be part of our sport and I welcome a second pair of experienced eyes to help guide me.

    Quote Originally Posted by mspeak View Post
    I've been riding bikes for years and understand the dimensions I need for a comfortable and efficient ride. So lets take this out of the equation.
    Hopefully you mean decades and not years as many of us have been riding since our first tricycle.

    You're getting backlash due to the general nature of your question and then defending your position by saying your experienced. Shouldn't an experienced rider already know what kind of frame suits him/her? I get where you are coming from. Nice to read some input and it is a forum. Hope you receive constructive posts that helps in your frame choice.

    Just to add my 2 cents, I say comfort matters more than aero. If you want both I hear the s5 is nice.
    You get all the sleep you need when you are dead

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    That's the weirdest question I have ever seen ? What the hell are you talking about ? Diverse terrain ? Sorry but WTF !

    ++++If you reside or have ridden in Southern Ontario then you would know that the terrain is diverse. It ranges from flat to punchy short climbs to frost heaved roads to windy rolling farm land. Therefore, given the breadth of terrain in the region, I was interested in hearing the opinions of others and why.+++

    The word you want to say is FLAT. It's flat terrain. I don't care about anything else, your ass, your knees and shoulder should tell you what bike you want. Also, you should be able to dial exactly any brand bike with a tape measure if you are many years of experience, end of story ! If you find southern ontario 'diverse' then you need to ride, and ride more again, and then again...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by identifiler View Post
    The word you want to say is FLAT. It's flat terrain.
    Most, but not all of southern Ontario is flat terrain. I often ride into the Caledon Hills, as it is anywhere along the Niagara escarpment, it is far from flat. I know at the other end of the GTA, around Northumberland County, there are large areas with great rolling countryside. Sure, it isn't the rockies, but I wouldn't call it all flat either.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hundminen View Post
    Most, but not all of southern Ontario is flat terrain. I often ride into the Caledon Hills, as it is anywhere along the Niagara escarpment, it is far from flat. I know at the other end of the GTA, around Northumberland County, there are large areas with great rolling countryside. Sure, it isn't the rockies, but I wouldn't call it all flat either.
    I know the area, I consider it flat... sorry. It's beside the friggin point anyways, bikes aren't terrain dependant and I am all for marketing but someone who thinks an aero frame is ideal for a given geographic area simply drinks kool aid.

  16. #16
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    I don't know if the beaver population is very important in Southern Ontario. If it is the case, I wouldn't recommend a wooden frame.

    But that is just my opinion.
    Last edited by zeego; 08-16-2011 at 04:07 PM.

  17. #17
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    Ontario = flat. 100% agree. I ride N of the GTA, I ride in renfrew county, I ride in Northumberland and Addington counties, as well as north of Coburg. Sure, there are hills, but's all relative. Bottom line, buy a bike that feels comy for you. Do you like stiff, aggressive geo or more enduro or plush comfort for long hours in the saddle? Do you race crits, ciompete in Tri's, simply or ride for pleasure and fitness. These are the questions I'd be using to determine the type of frame to buy, anywhere I happened to live.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by identifiler View Post
    I know the area, I consider it flat... sorry. It's beside the friggin point anyways, bikes aren't terrain dependant and I am all for marketing but someone who thinks an aero frame is ideal for a given geographic area simply drinks kool aid.

  19. #19
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    CCM....they are the best EH

  20. #20
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    Other than the frame that fits, there simply is no IDEAL frame.

  21. #21
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    Hello, This may be off topic or may not be off topic but I have a barely used GT ZR 4.0 that is 52 cm that is looking for a good home for a great price. I am not sure if you might be interested but if you or anyone else is interested, the bike was bought for me from my dad and I have only rode it for under 1 day as I hated it and should have never bought it. Its in perfect condition and could be a great starter bike for people. If anyone in this form knows of a good place to post this, please let me know. Currently, i'm looking to post it on Kijiji but always know thats a bad idea.

    stats from online about the bike:
    Bicycle Type Road race & triathlon
    MSRP (new) $969.99
    Weight Unspecified
    Sizes 48cm, 50cm, 52cm, 54cm, 56cm, 58cm, 60cm
    Colors Metallic Blue
    Item ID 35476

    Frame & Fork
    Frame Construction TIG-welded
    Frame Tubing Material 7000 aluminum
    Fork Brand & Model Kinesis
    Fork Material Aluminum, unicrown crown
    Rear Shock Not applicable

    Components
    Component Group Road Mix
    Brakeset Tektro dual pivot brakes, Shimano Tiagra STI Dual Control levers
    Shift Levers Shimano Tiagra STI Dual Control
    Front Derailleur Shimano Tiagra
    Rear Derailleur Shimano 105 GS
    Crankset Gt forged aluminum, 30/42/52 teeth
    Pedals Ritchey Logic Comp
    Bottom Bracket Tange Seiki
    BB Shell Width Unspecified
    Rear Cogs 8-speed, 12 - 25 teeth
    Chain KMC HG-72, 1/2 x 3/32"
    Seatpost Aluminum
    Saddle Selle Italia SPX
    Handlebar Modolo aluminum
    Handlebar Extensions Not included
    Handlebar Stem Aluminum
    Headset 1" Tange-Seiki Passage

    Wheels
    Hubs Aluminum
    Rims Mavic CXP 11
    Tires Panaracer GT
    Spoke Brand Stainless steel, 14g
    Spoke Nipples Unspecified


    Let me know if this peaks your interest. looking to get around 800

    Mosgrove at hotmail dot com located in Cambridge, Ontario.

  22. #22
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    You want $800 for a $970 MSRP bike??

    Sorry, but you're dreaming...8spd?? How old is this thing??

    Good luck...

    BTW, posting stuff for sale on the forums is frowned upon...There's a specific area for that...

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