CAADX 5 105 (2014) plus road wheels or separate road bike next year?
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  1. #1
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    CAADX 5 105 (2014) plus road wheels or separate road bike next year?

    I'm test riding the CAADX 5 105 tomorrow and am talking to my LBS about getting a separate set of wheels (WTB with stainless spokes) for the bike with Continental Gatorskin 28c tires for road use. The extra wheels with tires, brakes, etc. will cost ~$500. I'm wondering whether the stock cross wheels on the bike will do fine for road (paved trail) use or whether the separate set of wheels would be a smart investment. I'm a bit torn because the wheels are 1/3 to 1/2 the price of a decent road bike.

    I ride ~50% paved trail and 50% crushed stone (I average ~800 miles per months, if that's relevant).

    I suppose another option would be to hold off on separate wheels now and if the cross wheels aren't keeping pace, look for a road bike next year (maybe a 2014 or 2013 model at a substantial discount when the new ones come out).

    I'm sure some of you have faced a similar choice. Wondering what you'd recommend.

  2. #2
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    you should ride the stock wheels first.

    then decide whether you want a different set, for whatever justification you desire

    P.S. I believe the stock tires will be great for your riding.
    Last edited by tednugent; 04-10-2014 at 11:14 AM.
    2010 Specialized Secteur Elite with the RBR not-approved Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheelset
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp 29er upgraded to SRAM X9 with 1x10 and Stan's Arch EX rims and tubeless.
    2013 Cannondale CAADX-6 Tiagra with 9-speed SLX RD to run 11-32T cassette and Stan's Alpha 400 rims and tubeless
    and
    Some Burton snowboard setups, one with stiff ol' Camber and one with Rocker-Camber-Rocker

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tednugent View Post
    you should ride the stock wheels first.

    then decide whether you want a different set, for whatever justification you desire
    Well said.

    Will do what you suggested. Thanks.

    Ross

  4. #4
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    Maybe look for used wheels. It is a pain in the butt to swap tires back and forth on the rims.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Team Sarcasm View Post
    Maybe look for used wheels. It is a pain in the butt to swap tires back and forth on the rims.
    I can see your point if you're talking about tubeless for a cross tire and road tire... primarilly dealing with sealant.
    2010 Specialized Secteur Elite with the RBR not-approved Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheelset
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp 29er upgraded to SRAM X9 with 1x10 and Stan's Arch EX rims and tubeless.
    2013 Cannondale CAADX-6 Tiagra with 9-speed SLX RD to run 11-32T cassette and Stan's Alpha 400 rims and tubeless
    and
    Some Burton snowboard setups, one with stiff ol' Camber and one with Rocker-Camber-Rocker

  6. #6
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    nope. having to swap tires over and over again will become a huge drag. A new wheel set + a cassette is about 200. Add what ever tires you want. the 250-300 would be money well spent.

    Shimano R501-A Wheelset Black

  7. #7
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    How about some 27-28mm tyres that will do both - they're out there.

    cheers
    2011 'dale CAAD10 Berzerker - Ultegra6800 - for the serious stuff
    2012 'dale CAAD10 Team - Ultegra6800 - with compact for the hilly bits!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by macca33 View Post
    How about some 27-28mm tyres that will do both - they're out there.

    cheers
    ... like the Hutchinson Secteur for instance
    2010 Specialized Secteur Elite with the RBR not-approved Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheelset
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp 29er upgraded to SRAM X9 with 1x10 and Stan's Arch EX rims and tubeless.
    2013 Cannondale CAADX-6 Tiagra with 9-speed SLX RD to run 11-32T cassette and Stan's Alpha 400 rims and tubeless
    and
    Some Burton snowboard setups, one with stiff ol' Camber and one with Rocker-Camber-Rocker

  9. #9
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    If you can find a relatively cheap wheelset that is not heavy, you should go for it. A pair of 25 or 28 mm road tires for commuting will roll much smoother than the stock tires. My 2013 CAADX came with Schwalbe Sammy Slicks, 32 mm wide with file tread and knobs on the edges. I did a 80 mile road ride with friends(who were riding road bikes) on these tires and was able to hang with them, but I was way more tired at the end. Bottom line: even if the second wheelset is heavier, you will have less rolling resistance, air resistance, and rotational mass with road tires. Tires matter more than wheels for weight since they are farthest from the axle.

  10. #10
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    Any idea if the 13/14 CAAD X frame is 130 or 135 OLD rear?

  11. #11
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    Just measured on my '13 CAADX. The hub OLD is 135mm. Same with my new Specialized Tricross, which also has disc brakes. Maybe 135mm is the standard for a disc rear hub, whether mountain or cross (or road?).

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by VQuick View Post
    Just measured on my '13 CAADX. The hub OLD is 135mm. Same with my new Specialized Tricross, which also has disc brakes. Maybe 135mm is the standard for a disc rear hub, whether mountain or cross (or road?).
    Yes, all the Cannondale cross and road disc models all have 135mm rear hubs. As do most other brands as well.

    Back when cross bikes with discs were a rare thing, before they were legal in races, some companies were going with the road 'non-disc' standard but as the market picked up, pretty much everyone went with the 135mm standard, makes more sense (more room to add the disc while keeping a decent distance between each spoke flanges to keep it a little stiffer) and because it's also the mtb standard (well, for quick-release hubs), it opens up the rear hub options too. The idea of those who were going 130mm was too keep the road like chainline... but, as crosschaining makes sense for big-big combos but not for small-small combos, moving the cassette a little outboard is also a good thing IMO.

    DAN GEROUS

    : ROAD
    : CYCLOCROSS
    : MOUNTAIN BIKING

  13. #13
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    Good to know. Crosschaining big-big makes more sense because bigger gears don't wear as fast. Any other reasons? More chain tension?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by VQuick View Post
    Good to know. Crosschaining big-big makes more sense because bigger gears don't wear as fast. Any other reasons? More chain tension?
    More chain tension yes, angles between each chain links on bigger cogs/rings is smaller than on smaller cogs/rings so it's also more efficient (an infinite amount of energy is lost in each pivots each time they rotate, the more they 'bend' the more of your energy is lost in the drivetrain, very minimal but it's there) but those are not good enough reasons in my view.

    For me, I much prefer to stay on the big ring pretty much all the time, dropping to the small ring only when climbs are getting serious. So once on the small ring, as soon as I get close to the middle of the cassette, I hop back on the big ring (unless climbs pick up again just meters later).

    Front shifts are slower than rear shifts, you need to ease off the power a little, a little longer while shifting on the rear is pretty much instantaneous and can be done under power without much fuss. Most groups are designed to perform well on the big-big combo and while it's also possible to ride on the small-small combo on most modern groups, some setups rub somewhere.

    And last but not least, you look more pro on the big ring! While that's a sperficial reason, the opposite isn't as much, nothing says novice like someone riding on his small-small combo! Although some very professional pros sometimes shift on the small-small combo when they park their bike for a while, it puts less strain on the derailleurs springs...

    DAN GEROUS

    : ROAD
    : CYCLOCROSS
    : MOUNTAIN BIKING

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