Fit Fit Fit (Having One)
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  1. #1
    Doc
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    Fit Fit Fit (Having One)

    Love these forums. A new poster.

    Here's the situation. According to two on-line bike fitting systems, Flyte (compact frames) I measure for a 51cm frame and with Wrench Science a 51cm (center to top) or 50 cm (center to center). Ive ridden a 50 cm 'Dale and felt stuffed into the frame though bars and shifters were well within reach. Standing up on the pedals to sprint, bars, etc. seemed to close to my body. I've tested a 52 cm 'Dale (CAAD 8) and lost that 'stuffed' feeling but felt stretched out to bars/hoods. In the drops even more stretched. The bigger of the frames seems more natural to me and have read in a post here (somewhere) that's it's better to get a frame size a little larger than smaller because continual riding leads to more stretching. I need the bars closer to me (stem sizes?).I've read and followed numerous threads about fitting and am convinced of it's importance.

    I'll probably bike about an avg. of 100 miles per week. I do not race. I work on physical conditioning (every spring/summer): strong core,flexibility, etc. Deal is: LBS's idea of fitting is to ride a few bikes, tell him what adjustments to make, pay your money, out you go. But he's offering a sweet deal on new Cannondales.

    Is going with the larger frame advisable and adjusting the stem lengths? Or should I just keep looking for a bike (brand name) that fits me right enough to be perfect?

    Bike inseam: 30" Height: 5'6" Budget: $1,400

    Your input valued.

    The mind makes a good servant, but a cruel master.

  2. #2

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    Fitting

    Best advice is to decide which bike/ bikes you like and take their specs to someone who will do a personal fitting. (costs around 100.00) Best money spent if you are shelling out 1,400 or more for a bike. I too did the Wrench science and also competitive cyclist fitting for a new Colnago I was going to purchase. The size I received back was not the correct size for my comfort level and what was right for me. If I was going to spend 6,000 + on A bike I wanted to know It was right on for me. try to find a place that has a completeley adjustable fitting bike (cranks,stem, seat, bar width, etc ) Serotta makes a very good fit cycle.I do not believe a computer can tell you what you need. It can give you a good idea but each person is different. Just my opinion.

  3. #3

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    I'm not an expert on how to do a fitting so I won't comment on any of the actual fit side of things but when purchasing a bike, especially a road bike you can't just use the ticket price of the bike as a guide. You need to factor in whether they will give you a proper fitting where they will sit you on the bike on a trainer so they can fit the bike to you, make adjustments, switch out parts like different lengths of stems, ask how comfortable you are, look at your position on the bike and use a plumb line to make sure of the fit position. If a shop isn't willing to do that then deals they are offering shouldn't seem so sweet.

    You also need to look at what kind of servicing plan they provide with new bikes and what other added value you can get the store like whether it is the kind of place you can go just to chat about general bike stuff and whether you can just drop in with your bike to get minor adjustments made.

    So there is a lot more to consider than just the ticket price.

  4. #4

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    Good Advice

    Well said.

  5. #5

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    If I understand your post, it seems like you're anticipating that the bigger frame will fit properly with a shorter stem, but you haven't ridden it with that change because the shop won't do it. The shop should be able to switch out the stock stem for a shorter one in 5 minutes... literally. If they're not willing to make that simple change for you then consider going to a different shop that cares about customer satisfaction.
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  6. #6
    Doc
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    Sound Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by jnwarner0
    Well said.
    jnwarner

    Thank you for the sound advice. I hope I'm smart enough to take it.


    The mind makes a good servant, but a cruel master

  7. #7
    Doc
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    Quote Originally Posted by bc165
    If I understand your post, it seems like you're anticipating that the bigger frame will fit properly with a shorter stem, but you haven't ridden it with that change because the shop won't do it. The shop should be able to switch out the stock stem for a shorter one in 5 minutes... literally. If they're not willing to make that simple change for you then consider going to a different shop that cares about customer satisfaction.
    My LBS has expressed some disdain for Road bikers (although somewhat humorously) finding them to be too finicky and picky. I've broadened my list of BSs accordingly. There's no substitute for service. Thank for the advice.


    The mind makes a good servant but a cruel master

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc
    My LBS has expressed some disdain for Road bikers (although somewhat humorously) finding them to be too finicky and picky. I've broadened my list of BSs accordingly. There's no substitute for service. Thank for the advice.
    Good call!

    An attitude like that doesn't deserve your business, a large part of the fit is the fitter making changes based upon their observations and also ask your opinion on how you feel, it shouldn't be all about what you think. When I got fitted I had no idea about what was involved with getting fitted for a road bike so I was grateful that my LBS took the time to go through it all with me and didn't try to shaft me at all.

    That shop now gets all my business and now I'm even racing on their mountain bike team this season so good service goes a long way for a bike shop.

  9. #9
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    I've built-up several bikes up and they have served me well. This time around, I've been looking and talked with a LBS about various build options. He highly recco's a fit before jumping in and I -am- curious how many watts I am putting down efficiently.

    For those who have gone through this, have you been able to make obvious improvements from what you thought was "right" and what was concluded from a fit? What concerns me is I currently can be in the saddle without issues so changes after many comfortable years of riding kinda has me nervous.

    My sports ortho checked my knees in Jan and gave a big okay. He did suggest I change to Speedplay's for my new ride though. Short of a accident resulting in injury, the knees were great.

    Your thoughts?

  10. #10
    Doc
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kuma601
    I've built-up several bikes up and they have served me well. This time around, I've been looking and talked with a LBS about various build options. He highly recco's a fit before jumping in and I -am- curious how many watts I am putting down efficiently.

    For those who have gone through this, have you been able to make obvious improvements from what you thought was "right" and what was concluded from a fit? What concerns me is I currently can be in the saddle without issues so changes after many comfortable years of riding kinda has me nervous.

    My sports ortho checked my knees in Jan and gave a big okay. He did suggest I change to Speedplay's for my new ride though. Short of a accident resulting in injury, the knees were great.

    Your thoughts?

    Kuma601

    Having started this thread I compelled to at least offer you some idea. However others with more experience should have your ear and or at least your attention.

    If I understand your post correctly . . .Your LBS shouldn't be so mechanical as to 'fit' you like one mechanical part to another ie: rider to bike. It sounds to me like you've a certain kind of biking experience you enjoy and are comfortable with. Your LBS should listen to your expectations and figure this in to the "human" equation. All in all keeping in mind there's a lot to chose from in todays bike market so be open minded. As for fit, do you have your old bike to bring in as an example? In the end your the final arbiter for what works for you or not.

    I confess I don't know what you mean by watts?

    If I completely missed the point ...sorry.

    Doc

    "The mind makes a good servant, but a cruel master." Dion Fortune

  11. #11
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    Doc-

    You got it. Once I set one bike up, it was easy to build up suceeding bikes from the measurments on hand. Like many aspects, finding a good fitter can be a challenge...that is the big "?"

    One LBS was fitting up a rider and was measuring output (measured in watts) along with heart rate at the given output. This interested me because while I feel I may be dialed in, a bit of fine tuning may make saddle time much nicer.

    A quick Google turned this up...for those that may be unfamiliar.
    http://www.bobozone.com/bike_fitting.htm
    Last edited by Kuma601; 02-03-2006 at 09:45 PM.

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