6 months to Haleakala - Page 2
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  1. #26
    CHT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flexnuphill View Post
    Hello CHT,

    I did not know the guides dropped you off at the gate, very useful infor. My wife may change her mind about guidance if they only take you up the easiest 2/3rds of the ride.T
    The gatehouse rule is relatively new. Apparently there was a death of a cyclist coming down with one of the tour companies that just takes you down. They couldn't just ban those tour companies, so all tour companies were banned. Some tour companies going up may still try and and go through if they are not known to the parks personnel so I would ask.
    It's better to burn out, then to fade away....

  2. #27
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    I'll add my 2 cents....
    I did this ride back in March, I was debating weather to do it along or with a company, at first I was going to do it with a company but at the end I changed my mind and decided to go it alone, I lucked out as I just happened to bump into another guy in the parking lot that was also getting ready to ride, so we ended up riding together (more or less), and then we picked up a 3rd rider at the park entrance/rest area so we had our own little trio going.
    Having said all that, if your wife wants to guide and that will make it more enjoyable for her then it's worth the money just for that, however be sure to make sure that they can get to the top, if like someone else mentioned they stop at 6700 feet then I wouldn't think it's worth it. I think the tours offer 4 things, Camaraderie on the ride, Food, carrying your warm clothes (for the descent) to the top and some piece of mind if you have a mechanical. From my experience I would say that the food part is totally not needed, as there is a really nice deli at about 3k feet that you could stop at, grab a sandwich, Gatorade, energy bars etc... and you can refill your bottles at the park entrance at 6700k so as long as your fill your pockets with enough bars/gels you are totally fine, I think for the other 3 things it could be nice to pay someone for those, especially for the warm clothes, trust me you will want to have lots of it at the top.
    Jacket, Long finger gloves, knee warmers etc.. but if the van doesn't go to the top then it's tough to justify the cost.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flexnuphill View Post
    I have a Garmin, I can maintain 2500' to 2700' per hour over 45 minutes (the longest climb I have access to) at my current level of fitness. I agree about the supported ride, although I think my wife has a notion that I may end up dropping her to chase Bob from Nebraska, that's why she wants the group support.

    Ipod.. good idea, thanks.
    You should have no problem doing the climb. At 147 lbs. and with a VAM in the high 700 range that should put you in the 4 hour in saddle time + 1 hour accumulated total time in stops = 5 hour total time. I would use 39-28 minimum gearing for a climb like that since I am sure there are sections well over 7% and in such a long climb it's best to have easier gears just in case.

    I weight 192 lbs and I can do a 700 vam sustained but I have to produce a lot more power to do that you have a really good weight for climbing as is.

    You should be good by doing 4 hour rides at good tempo.

  4. #29
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    I live on Maui and thought I would throw my two cents in, I just skimmed the other responses so please excuse me if this has already been mentioned. I have climbed the crater over 20 times with times ranging from 5:03 as an untrained cyclist to 3:20 after 6 months of coaching. I have worked as a guide taking tours up. and done the climb by myself, and with friends. The following is what I have learned and think is important:

    Bike Setup:

    compact gearing 34, 28 at least. Shimano makes a 12-30 rear cassette which will work with a med cage deriallier on most brands.
    If you can bring your bike great if not at least bring your seat and pedals and accurate measurments to get the rental as close as possible to your current setup.

    Timing:

    This is really important, most days the crater is sunny and clear in the morning but starts to cloud in and get windy by lunch time. starting early gives you a much better chance of getting good weather and believe me it sucks riding up in the clouds with a light rain taking precious energy away when you need it most. If you are going to rent get the bike the afternoon before so you can start early! Guided rides meet at the shop at 8:30 but in my experience by the time you actually start it's at least 9:15 or later depending on how many people they have to get setup.

    Nutrition:

    I usually figure on 6 bottles. If you are unsupported you can get water at kula lodge just bellow crater road turnoff and then at 6600 at visiter center. Personally I like to have some electrolytes and calories in my bottles. skratch makes some nice single serving packets. bring more bars than you think I almost always wish I had more by about 8000 ft. a few gels for the last push seem to work well for me.

    Clothing:

    I have lived on Maui for twenty years and may be a bit of a whimp when it comes to the cold... If you are a skinny bike rider like me, 50 degree with 25 mile an hour wind chill means brrr. If you get caught in the misty clouds or rain it's even colder. Going up regular bibs and short sleeve jersey are fine. my toes get cold and i will put on toe warmers above 6500 if i am not in a hurry. For the decent I add leg warmers, arm warmers long fingered gloves and a balaklava (did I mention I hate being cold?)

    Ride plan:

    You should think of the ride in four parts. Paia to crater road, crater road to park entrance and entrance to summit and finally the decent. It is important to pace yourself, if you go hard up to crater road you will pay big time near the top. Crater road to the park entrance is the steepest part. The top third is less steep but the air is thinner. The decent can be just as hard as going up. I actually prefer to get a ride down to 6000 then ride the rest of the way. Hands get sore from braking and my neck can get quite painful, maybe from the angle?

    If you are in shape, take your time, and start early I'm sure you will make it! If you have any questions feel free to PM me

    Aloha!
    Pete

  5. #30
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    Aloha Pete,

    Wow, thanks for the insight. My wife and I are training ourselves so we are looking for an ascent time between the 3 and 5 hours.

    The shop we are renting from has 34/ 28 -30 gearing, we both ride the same configuration here in Central Virginia. Although we don't have a 10K feet to ascend we have what feels like endless hills that roll up and down between 500 to 3.5K feet. Our goal, before we make our way to Maui, is 100 miles in 5 1/2 - 6 hours with a total ascent of 8K feet, that's as good as it gets here.

    I read your post to my wife, she laughed when you mentioned your dislike of being cold, she can empathize. While we were living in Honolulu, she was the only mainlander I knew who had to wear an evening sweater during the 'winter' season.

    The information I have been given by people, including yourself, here has been very helpful. We are slowly ramping up our endurance and power and gettting more excited as the time passes.

    We plan on enjoying the ride, and the rest of our time on Maui.

    Mahalo,

    Todd

  6. #31
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    Most of you unsupported ride with a backpack with your cold weather gear? I'm thinking of doing that with 100oz reservoir and using that. I usually hate having a pack on but in this ride I think it is required!

  7. #32
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    u can get water at the visitor center about half way up

  8. #33
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    Training for Haleakala

    So my wife and I are into six of an eleven week trainerroad.com program.
    I choose a program that was intended to improve endurance and FTP for an advanced century. I reasoned training for a distance 2 1/2 longer than our intended goal would get us in reasonable condition to tackle 38 miles at a 5.2 % grade.

    Having never trained like this, I can say 36 minutes of over and unders (OUs) are a heck of a lot harder than anything else I have ever tried. We are using a KK trainer and it makes any climb I've ever done in the Blue Ridge/Skyline Drive seem like a walk in the park. I've noticed slow and steady improvements in the power we can maintain over longer periods of time... although it burns like hell. The upside of course is I dropped another pound and I'm eating like a horse.

    Tonight I'm doing OUs for another 40 minutes for a total ride time of an hour.
    I have found that I feel better in the morning but my legs are trashed for the day. When I train in the evening, I find the day has already tired me out so my motivation is low. The upside to spinning at night is I get to fall in bed an hour or so afterward.

    I think using the Trainerroad program has given us a challenge and a goal that will help with our ride. I am very curious to see how we do on the mountain.

    T

  9. #34
    evs
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    Dude, you better take pics when you get to the top ;-) or it didn't happen.
    'Over the Mountains Of the Moon, Down the Valley of the Shadow, Ride, Boldly Ride,' The Shade replied, - 'If you Seek for El Dorado!'

  10. #35
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    I'd like to shed some light on this this thread after reading every post I decided to do it unsupported also. I completed the climb two weeks ago and would like to add a couple of things.

    Me & Training: 29/175lbs/5'10", I love food, beer, and cycling, so I'm not in "super shape" I started Cycling in Feb of 2013 and my biggest ride was 116ish miles and roughly 8k vert (but this was in August also). I live in Eastern Washington where the hills are a plenty, but our riding season really ends in October so I had not ridden at all between October and January. In Jan I started riding a trainer at least 4 times a week in the garage following a couple of Youtube videos but never more than an hour really. Also did some light core exercises because I got a beer belly and my back hurts after a while in the saddle.

    Trip: I brought my own bike, instead of renting. A guy that I met up with rented a bike for one day just do the climb. I arrived in Paia at 7am and headed up, sun pretty much the whole way. Stopped at Kula Lodge (13 miles and 3,000ft) in, had a snack, drank some water and went up. Once you get into the switchbacks around 4k that to me was the steepest part, I was doing avg 5-6mph this part, but its more like 7% compared to the rest. Stopped at the visitors center at 7,000 feet (25 miles in) and got more water, had a bar and a break still pacing myself but felt pretty good. Headed for the top and made it in a total of 4:45 minutes Moving time (5:24 with stops). Near the visitors center at the top there was a very strong headwind, the small part when you go up to the observatory the wind was blowing straight through there at my face and I almost fell off the bike going so slow I had to walk til around the corner and hop back on for the last stretch. Ya I walked 100 feet, but I made it! Decent took 1:15 minutes and the wind held me from going much faster, did not have to use the brakes that much.


    Gear: I had a good day with minimal clouds on the way up (forecast said increasing clouds later) and rode up in jersey and shorts putting sunblock on every stop and was fine. At the top I threw on a jacket, toe warmers, and long gloves. The ride down from 10k to 7k was pretty damn cold, I wish I'd had my leg warmers and arm warmers at the time, but I dont think it was worth packing them. Took the jacket back off around 3k. I used 6 water bottles for the entire trip like someone else mentioned in here.

    Road: The road from 0-7k is perfect, wide shoulders, smooth, its in great condition minus a small stretch up to Makawao where its a little bumpy. 7-9k is pretty good too, its just more packed rougher gravel style road inside the park. From 9-10 the road is pretty beat up, not really alot of smooth running here, I noticed myself riding in one of the car tracks (where it was smooth) instead of the side, which there are not really sides anyways so what matters right.



    Anyways, hope this helps some, A+ would do again!

  11. #36
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    Oh hell yeah I'm taking pictures! We both have power meters, so when we get home I'm downloading the rides on the respective software each power meter uses.

    The second week we are on Kaui'i, we are going to hike the Na'pali coast trail and camp overnight, that's an eight hour hike in and out. With 30lbs of crap on our backs, I have a feeling the hike is going to be tougher than the ride.

    T

  12. #37
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    Excellent effort dude, congratulations, thanks for the very valuable insight.

    We had what I thought was a good base by the end of December so I decided to try a self motivated training program. I'm tracking our ride data, we seem to be getting stronger by the numbers and by the way we feel at the beginning of eack week, the real test of course will be the ride.

    Again, thanks for the info.

    T

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flexnuphill View Post
    Excellent effort dude, congratulations, thanks for the very valuable insight.

    We had what I thought was a good base by the end of December so I decided to try a self motivated training program. I'm tracking our ride data, we seem to be getting stronger by the numbers and by the way we feel at the beginning of eack week, the real test of course will be the ride.

    Again, thanks for the info.

    T
    I think for your power output, and what you've said I don't think it will be a problem at all.

    Thing that wore me out the most was worrying about it lol.

  14. #39
    evs
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    Airpoppoff, great job, good info...
    and you took a pic Need more though. Flexnuphill, keep training. you're almost there. Wow, that's quite the hike with that gear. Never mind the 8 hours. It should be quite the scenery. I hope you post up a nice ride report with some cool pics of your trip. Sounds like a fun ride up that you have planned. Good luck, have fun and stay with the little lady. :-)
    'Over the Mountains Of the Moon, Down the Valley of the Shadow, Ride, Boldly Ride,' The Shade replied, - 'If you Seek for El Dorado!'

  15. #40
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    Hey Flex, I see you posted this in October, your ride should be coming up. I've ridden up Haleakala 3 times. The first time for training for a annual race called Cycle to the Sun. I'm not sure if that's the ride you're doing or not. But it was a lot of fun each year. They have great volunteers every 8 miles are so for support. Riders are NOT allowed to ride their bikes back down. It's very dangerous with all the riders coming up, and the roads are not closed either. The first time I rode up for training, I was extremely tired from riding back down- having to brake on each switch back all the way down (I think there's like 30+ switch backs).
    Enjoy the ride! Think about bringing layers for when you get higher in altitude (I suggest a wind breaker jacket or at least sleeves). The first year I rode up, it was beautiful, no layering required. The last year I rode up, it was FREEZING! High winds, it was like 40 degrees. Very cold up top (considering is was a mild 78 degrees when we started). Good Luck!
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  16. #41
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    OK, so we have 10 days left of training and I feel tired. We used a high intensity short duration program that had us peak 2 weeks ago. We are both maintaining and tapering down a bit to rest up for the ride itself. I'm going to try 3 more spin sessions before we leave then maybe an hour or so on Maui, but that depends upon how we both feel. I'm listening to my body now and it's telling me to slow down and rest. We are not going improve our fitnes any more in the next two weeks to make any real difference.

    We are getting excited, the weather here in Central Virginia has basically sucked all winter. We've had 4 maybe 5 snow storms and cold freaking temperatures for the last 2 months, tropical weather and riding outside, (not spinning to nowhere) will be welcomed break.

    Thanks for the tips John, I plan on writing a brief follow up when we get back.

    T

  17. #42
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    How did it go? Any pics?
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  18. #43
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    Good going and good luck!



    Quote Originally Posted by mauiguy View Post
    I live on Maui and thought I would throw my two cents...


    mauiguy, how long for your recovery for back to back climbs?

  19. #44
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    OK

    I made it. Time on the bike was 5 hours. I took longer than I wanted because I was conservative with my effort, I really wanted to make it to the top. I drank 6 bottles of water and ate a lot of freakin food, actually I ran out of food by the time I reached the top. I met a gentleman from Cape Cod who finished the ride 15 minutes before me and was kind enough to give me a couple of handfulls of trail mix for the way down.

    Here's what I learned about me and Haleakala:

    I had some left at the end, so I would like to do ride again and push myself harder. I would choose a better (warmer) time of the year to try again. Sonny, (man from cape Cod) and I tried to ride back down but only made it to the visitors center. We hit a wall of water at about 8000ft and by the time we made it to the visitors center, we were in the beginning stages of hypothermia. I called my wife and she made her way up the hill took us back down to Paia.

    I would train a bit differently to do it again. I'd have better strength base and more hours at 70 % effort. I understand why people do it more than once, the first time you get an idea what it takes to survive the effort, the second time you train your butt off and bust it getting to the top.

    The experience was fun, I would do it again, given the opportunity.

    I was so wrapped up in the ride I only had one picture taken, the one that matters, I'll post as soon as I can.
    Last edited by Flexnuphill; 04-16-2014 at 12:41 PM. Reason: New information

  20. #45
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    Awesome job man!

  21. #46
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    Did your wife do it with you? Or did I imagine that part?

  22. #47
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    She made it the Rangers station and bowed out. She was very disappointed that she couldn't finish. She said she didn't have the legs, I think it was her head that kept her from finishing. According to her she didn't sleep much the night before (anxiety) . I think if she would have slept as well as I did she would have made it. After 7 hours of blissful sleep I knew I was ready.

    P4010292.jpg

    Here I am in all my Haleakala glory.

    T

  23. #48
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    Awesome! Now you'll have to plan a future expedition to give her the chance to reach the top.

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