Advice for climbing - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by gfz84 View Post
    Appreciate any suggestions to get better here. Thanks!
    Since you said any suggestions, have you seen these?

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Since you said any suggestions, have you seen these?
    Ofcourse, love GCN vids. I particularly like the video where Si climbs up Jones St in SanFran which is apparently a 30% grade and gives the pro-tip of sitting on the nose of the saddle if sitting while tackling a steep climb. Will try to put it to practice and see how that goes.

  3. #28
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    I am 5' 8" and weigh 143 lbs
    If I had an extra 15 lbs on my frame there is no way I could climb at the pace that I do now

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by gfz84 View Post
    I use my Garmin to broadcast my HR to my Wahoo and it's one of the display fields on my main screen. I honestly don't look at HR too much during the ride but only post ride wherein I usually average about 140ish overall. ...................
    You don't have to!
    There are several apps that give one the audio warning if maxHR is exceeded.
    That's when I easy off to keep it quiet and check how steep that section of the 18km climb is.
    Yesterday's 16% was a true surprise.
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  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSR View Post
    Yes, there are technical details you can add once youíre on top of your game.

    Keep your hands on the bar tops, holding them lightly. Donít waste energy by squeezing hard.

    Rotate your hips forward, keeping your spine straight. The objective is to open your diaphragm to maximize air intake.

    Slide back in the saddle a little, sit bones right at the back of the saddle. Concentrate on pedaling from one oíclock to seven oíclock in order to apply power through the top of the arc with no dead spot.

    When you bog down and want to stand to regain your cadence, first shift to a harder gear, or even go up two. Shift back down once you sit again, or you might even find youíve found a new rhythm in the harder gear.

    A couple of exercises from Joe Frielís Training Bible:

    Hill repeats. On a six to eight percent hill climb for 30 to 40 seconds in a gear you can just hold at 70 rpm. Repeat 3 to 8 times with 2 to 4 minutes rest in between.

    Cruise intervals. On a 2 to 4 percent hill climb at anaerobic threshold for 6 to 12 minutes. Stay seated, concentrating on smooth pedal stroke and minimal upper body motion. Do 3 to 5 reps, resting for 25 percent of the previous intervalís time in between (i.e. if it was six minutes rest 90 seconds).

    You donít say whether you have a power meter or heart rate monitor. Power meters are expensive, but provide the best way to target your exercises.

    Heart rate monitors are not expensive and provide a very valuable way to work out. With a little bit of work (or $150 at the local university sports science lab) you can find your workout zones and youíll know for certain whether you have something left to give next time Mr. Beer Belly comes up along side.

    HTH
    Really good advise here with emphasis on the bolded comments. You can also learn to pace yourself paying attention to your breathing, but power meter's and HR monitors are better until you really get in touch with your breathing / PE assessments. I would also add, on long climbs learn to rotate muscle groups by alternating between standing, sitting, forward and back on the saddle.
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  6. #31
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    Relaxing as much as possible while climbing is great advice.

    Another is pacing. It was the number 1 thing I had to learn to become a better climber.

    Also every climb is different and how you respond to it is different but mostly depending on your strengths and also your condition when you start the climb. A climb early in a ride will most likely be much easier than if you did the same climb late in the ride.

    In group rides I learned that most people go way too hard early in most climbs longer than roughly half a mile or .75km. and over 5%. Once I realized that, it was like a revelation. It never gets old passing people who take off like rockets at the start when you get midway or 3/4 of the way up a climb.

    So I started paying attention to my body's response in both how much my legs and lungs were hurting. Once I realized that, I started paying attention to my heart rate to measure my efforts - then when I got a power meter, it was even better/easier.

    When I was riding competitively, I started to train my climbing strength, both seated and standing. I would do specific days where I would do repeats on 1.5 mile climb avg 7% with a 11% max section. Some days I would alternate high cadence and low cadence reps, standing only reps, seated only reps. Others were gearing ladders starting low to high back to low. As I got stronger, I would sometimes take a couple of extra water bottles for added weight - large 24 oz cameback bottles add around 1.5 lbs per bottle. It is also important to vary the climbs you train on to compensate for adaptation - if you have other climbs near you.

    I'm not the best climber out there by any means (I never was built for it) but I significantly improved my climbing by training it specifically. I am still able to hold my own in the local worlds rides on the harder and longer climbs.

  7. #32
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    you gotta do some intervals, like 8 min and 20 min intervals. 8 min intervals are good practice for short climb, like what you're doing. For longer climbs, do 20min int.

    You want spin, c'mon nobody mashes these days. But spinning alone is not enough. You have to spin with FORCE. Spinning with force will take practice, lots of practice. The problem with mashing is that it won't last, then you'll burn out, then you'll now need to sit and go into a lower gear and spin... and here's is where you need to spin with force and not just free spin. I see lots of guys who spin but they're not spinning with force, so they're going no where. To be able to spin with force will take dedicated interval works.

    for starter, go do some 8min intervals, at 80-90% effort, with a 2min rest between sets. Do at least 3 sets for each session. Don't go hard in the first set, i.e., don't "dig deep", because if you do then you won't be able to finish the last set. Remeber, this is training.

  8. #33
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    So I am here to report that I was able to finally do this climb without stopping to catch my breath. Albeit, I was one of the slowe riders to climb it. But I will take it. Today's ride was a lot of climbing and the suggestions I got here very all helpful. I still have a long way to go to become a better climber. But given my stats, my avg speed would be significantly higher if not for the climbs where I still suck. I feel i am in the biggest gear and my speed drops to a miserable 5-6mph on steep hills compared to other stronger riders who still maintain 10-12mph on the same sections. Seems like I need to put in more work but happy to report the small achievement so far.
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  9. #34
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    Congratulations... As you know, keep riding, seek out hills, and more improvement will come.

  10. #35
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    I'm amazed you got 3500ft of climbing riding along the river? OMG.
    I went over the mtn yesterday for a 4 hour ride and got about that, and I had 9.5mph average.
    .... so I'm not riding with u any more!
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  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    I'm amazed you got 3500ft of climbing riding along the river? OMG.
    I went over the mtn yesterday for a 4 hour ride and got about that, and I had 9.5mph average.
    .... so I'm not riding with u any more!
    I can't really tell if you are being serious or sarcastic here. If you seriously averaged 9.5mph, I am confused since what happened to the descents? Was it an alpine like climb with hairpin turns? My ride was a mix of short, steep and long climbs but I tried to make up for the lost time on the flats and descents. And this is a popular route in the area and stronger riders here average about 17-18mph on the same route so I wasn't even that fast.

  12. #37
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    It was a gravel ride, yes with switchbacks, about 1/4 pavement. It was cold coming down in the shade.

    ...I still can't believe the elevation you had, seriously!
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  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    It was a gravel ride, yes with switchbacks, about 1/4 pavement. It was cold coming down in the shade.

    ...I still can't believe the elevation you had, seriously!
    Here's the elevation chart. I am not bluffing..lol
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  14. #39
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    OK, I looked at the area on Google, your route must go up and down that ridge above the river.
    Those are some serious climbs, I can see where you were having issues and came here. But, I feel inadequate now giving advice to such brutal physical route.
    ... as I said, I'm not riding with you and will retire to the observatory.
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  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    OK, I looked at the area on Google, your route must go up and down that ridge above the river.
    Yup.
    Some of my most hilly brutal rides have been along rivers. Rivers are typically in valleys. Up down up down all day long.
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  16. #41
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    Ha Ha, pretty funny. You should just take up hiking!
    .... and u're on ignore.
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  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetdog9 View Post
    Congratulations... As you know, keep riding, seek out hills, and more improvement will come.

    Thanks! I do feel slightly more confident on steeper climbs now.
    I have also decided to upgrade the stock aluminum wheelset with a carbon wheelset with a dt350 hub. It's not necessarily to improve my climbing but for overall aero gains and weight savings (they are about 1500g) I know this isn't going to dramatically improve my performance here but what do you think would be realistic expectations from an upgrade to good carbon wheelset on hills?

  18. #43
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    If they are decently lighter than the stock rims, they will feel snappier and easier to accelerate and climbing may feel easier. With lighter wheels, there will less of a flywheel affect at speed. If deeper, they will be a bit faster at speeds above 20mph. Also if deeper, you will probably feel crosswinds more - assuming shallow depth stock aluminum wheels.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Yup.
    Some of my most hilly brutal rides have been along rivers. Rivers are typically in valleys. Up down up down all day long.
    ... so there are 1000' climbs near Yonkers? where?
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  20. #45
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    So while I have PR'd multiple times on this climb and have improved my climbing generally, I also wanted to know what's the general gear set-up that people are using here. I am currently running a 50/34 and a 11-spd 11-34 cassette. I am thinking of putting a 11-32 to help with cadence on steep climbs. Currently my cadence drops to about 55-60 on the really steep sections (>10,%) and I wanted to know if an 11-32 will actually be helpful.

  21. #46
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    You currently have 11-34 and want to go to 11-32 "to help with cadence on steep climbs"?
    Something seems wrong here - do you really want to decrease the range?

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    I'm amazed you got 3500ft of climbing riding along the river? OMG.
    I went over the mtn yesterday for a 4 hour ride and got about that, and I had 9.5mph average.
    .... so I'm not riding with u any more!
    You must not be from NYC? I live near that river and my usual ride is 25 miles 2,000 feet AND I avoid the final climb at the end of the park as I'm a bigger guy, that would put me at 25 miles 2,500 feet.

    I'm a pretty big guy at 200lbs + and never thought of myself as a climber but with that exact route (albeit shorter) being my normal ride I've really developed my short term climbing abilities. I think nothing of rides which are 1,000 feet per 10 miles.
    Last edited by 9W9W; 4 Days Ago at 11:40 PM.
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  23. #48
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    I'm with Got Time, confused by your cassette question. What's your cadence on the climb now and what do you think you want to do?

    Like people mention earlier in the thread, gearing choice is all over the map. I'm too heavy and don't have the time anymore to invest in becoming a spectacular cyclist. But I enjoy climbing more than anything else and ride 53/39 and 11-28. It's probably not the best gearing for me and I may switch to 52/36 in the front soon but it's what I'm used to.

    Nowadays there are pros riding 50/34 and 11-28, 11-32, or even lower in grand tours on climbing stages. But there are others who stick with more old school higher gearing.

    With gravel bikes becoming popular there are people road riding with super duper low gears...

    With your gears if you continue to ride, you should be able to climb just about anything. And probably easily, no need to kill yourself every time on hills.
    Last edited by jetdog9; 4 Days Ago at 12:01 AM.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    You must not be from NYC?
    No I am not, why?
    List a address or section of that road that has a constant climb of 1000', not this up/down 50 times BS.
    His profile of elevation lists 3 of them, so it should be really easy to identify.
    Are you from NYC? What difference does that make. If your from NYC, are your feet in a different dimension?
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  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Got Time View Post
    You currently have 11-34 and want to go to 11-32 "to help with cadence on steep climbs"?
    Something seems wrong here - do you really want to decrease the range?
    My bad for the typo..I have a 11-28 cassette and thinking of either a 11-32 or a 11-34. Tempted to go 11-34 for that 1x1 ratio but again concerned about bigger jumps in gears, cadence on flats etc..

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