How long can you last at max HR....
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  1. #1
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    How long can you last at max HR....

    before you blow up or throw up? What is typical? Does the time that someone can sustain max HR change with fitness level?

    Anyone...anyone?

  2. #2
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    Wife says i'm good for three minutes....nevermind.

  3. #3
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    max = max...anything more = dead.

    Chad

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    Max HR is usually only sustainable for few seconds.

    But your really asking about anaerobic power.

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    The (very) few times that I have hit a true max hr, it was a very short spike (a couple of seconds / a few heartbeats / one or two readout updates on the HR monitor), usually following a very intense effort that left me seeing spots, gasping for air and unable to pedal for several minutes.

    You might be confusing true max hr with "a very hard pace" which could be anything from "threshold" to "vo2" to a short sprint effort...
    * not actually a Rock Star

  6. #6
    Farmguy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nimitz
    max = max...anything more = dead.

    Chad
    Nope, you just will pass out until you recover, at some point the body quits until you heart slows down. Now is it smart to do it all the time to that point ?, probably not.

  7. #7
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    My max is approx. 190 (i have never seen anything higher on my HR and I have pushed to the point of near collapse a number of times)

    If I was a pro in the TDF, how long would I be able to keep 184 bpm (96% max) before I puke or pass out or blow up?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk
    My max is approx. 190 (i have never seen anything higher on my HR and I have pushed to the point of near collapse a number of times)

    If I was a pro in the TDF, how long would I be able to keep 184 bpm (96% max) before I puke or pass out or blow up?
    the same amount of time it takes for the store owner to return after he puts up a "back soon" sign in the window while he's out.
    you cant say 3rd without turd.

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    what's with all the heart rate questions lately? It's like a time warp to 1990.

  10. #10
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    HR response is slow. If you are doing an effort that requires your heart to go to max, you will quit before it gets there. Trained, you can maintain that effort for 7-10 seconds and your HR will peak after you stop. - TF
    "Don't those guys know they're old?!!"
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevesbike
    what's with all the heart rate questions lately? It's like a time warp to 1990.
    everyone has had to sell their power meters to feed their families in these recessionary times
    you cant say 3rd without turd.

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevesbike
    what's with all the heart rate questions lately? It's like a time warp to 1990.

    Sorry....need to sell the house to get a power meter to be cool like all the "legit" 2010 riders I see. I was racing mtb bikes in 1990. It is much more common to see a HR monitor today than in 1990.

    This would answer your question as to why there might be more questions today in 2010 vs. 1990....in case you were really interested and not just being condescending.

    Now, do you have any useful feedback for me? I mean, afterall, you do have 20 years of HR info under your belt.
    Last edited by rydbyk; 06-02-2010 at 09:16 AM.

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    heres something which you might not be aware of and some of us are saying what we are, hr is VERY unstable on a day to day basis, so many things effect it for instance heat, humidity, cold, stress, anxiety, fatigue..the list goes on! and so because of this your heart rate will have different max on different days its a very good indicator of effort, but is limited and saying how long can you sustain max is the wrong question really, the fact its your max means you cannot sustain it so, seconds, 5 maybe and thats a push if it truely is your max hr.
    you cant say 3rd without turd.

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by muscleendurance
    heres something which you might not be aware of and some of us are saying what we are, hr is VERY unstable on a day to day basis, so many things effect it for instance heat, humidity, cold, stress, anxiety, fatigue..the list goes on! and so because of this your heart rate will have different max on different days its a very good indicator of effort, but is limited and saying how long can you sustain max is the wrong question really, the fact its your max means you cannot sustain it so, seconds, 5 maybe and thats a push if it truely is your max hr.
    Max heart rates are all over the place. Most people don't have a clue what their max is and any formula that says it calculates your max is only a guess. The 220-age one is especially bad as it assumes a sedentary individual. No reason you have to lose a beat a year if you keep in shape. It will go down as you age, but not nearly that fast. Think of max this way. If you do sprint repeats till you puke you're probably still 5 beats or so away from max.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

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    Ok, then how bout this--how long do pros last over threshold? Or is the threshold so high that there simply isn't that much headroom?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrumpole
    Ok, then how bout this--how long do pros last over threshold? Or is the threshold so high that there simply isn't that much headroom?
    the same as the rest of us who are trained but not necessarily pros
    1hr+ they just go faster while they are there.
    you cant say 3rd without turd.

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrumpole
    Ok, then how bout this--how long do pros last over threshold? Or is the threshold so high that there simply isn't that much headroom?
    HR is not a measure of threshold, so the question really doesn't make a lot of sense.

    One typically experiences a range of HRs when riding at threshold levels.

  18. #18
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    I aggree with all those that said a couple seconds, that's before I fall over from lack of oxygen to the brain.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk
    Sorry....need to sell the house to get a power meter to be cool like all the "legit" 2010 riders I see. I was racing mtb bikes in 1990. It is much more common to see a HR monitor today than in 1990.

    This would answer your question as to why there might be more questions today in 2010 vs. 1990....in case you were really interested and not just being condescending.

    Now, do you have any useful feedback for me? I mean, afterall, you do have 20 years of HR info under your belt.
    actually, I was using a heart rate monitor back in 1982 - it was a wired model. If you want to train with a heart monitor, do a field test, find your heart rate that corresponds to various training levels, and have at it. Get a book like heart zones cycling for more info. But don't worry about meaningless issues like how long you can maintain your max heart rate - it's a maximum so will be by definition the highest single value you record. And don't worry about how it compares to other people - that's meaningless as well. FWIW, a power meter isn't really that expensive. You can find a powertap on ebay for well under $1k. It's by far the best training tool I've ever purchased.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevesbike
    actually, I was using a heart rate monitor back in 1982 - it was a wired model. If you want to train with a heart monitor, do a field test, find your heart rate that corresponds to various training levels, and have at it. Get a book like heart zones cycling for more info. But don't worry about meaningless issues like how long you can maintain your max heart rate - it's a maximum so will be by definition the highest single value you record. And don't worry about how it compares to other people - that's meaningless as well. FWIW, a power meter isn't really that expensive. You can find a powertap on ebay for well under $1k. It's by far the best training tool I've ever purchased.

    Yeh..I guess it is "meaningless". I was keeping track of how long it was taking me at NEAR max to feel like quitting. Then I thought, "Hey...are other riders able to withstand more perhaps..am I being a pu**y...OR is it totally normal to feel like crap at near max after a short period of time..."

  21. #21
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    The max I've experienced was 224, but I pretty much flat lined within a few seconds of that. It essentially peaked and then went down to about 210 and stayed there for about 5 seconds and then I was completely done.

    I experienced this doing a climb up the Niagara escarpment that I was not ready for at all. ie. First ride of the season with almost no base and my friends wanted me to climb up the steepest/worst climb within a few hundred km. I succeeded, but it was not worth that level of effort.

  22. #22
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    some approaches base training zones as a percentage of max heart rate, but this is inaccurate since these change with fitness (e.g., threshold heart rate/max heart rate increases with fitness). It is better to determine threshold heart rate in a field test and base training zones around that. Friel's book is another decent source for this. Also, don't worry too much about the physiological interpretation of threshold heart rate (whether it's a lactate threshold, etc). Just think of it as a functional threshold and base training zones around it.
    http://www.trainingbible.com/joesblo...-training.html

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk
    Yeh..I guess it is "meaningless". I was keeping track of how long it was taking me at NEAR max to feel like quitting. Then I thought, "Hey...are other riders able to withstand more perhaps..am I being a pu**y...OR is it totally normal to feel like crap at near max after a short period of time..."
    I don't train by heart rate, but I do typically record it. When people say that your HR is meaningless, I don't think they're necessarily trying to be snide, but rather that they mean that HR is not effort (and not a good proxy for effort), and aren't you really asking about quitting/reducing a level of effort?

    I'm not sure what you mean about "feel[ing] like crap" in this context, but in truly maximal, short efforts, I see a noticeable drop off in power long before the physical discomfort of the effort would make me "stop," and my HR is still increasing at that point unless I started the effort from a pretty high HR. In longer efforts, I don't think that being at maximum heart rate dictates definitively whether I have to quit the current level of power production, but it will almost always mean I would dial it back if there wasn't some good reason for it.

    I have been in the situation where my power output has slowly declined throughout the last ten laps of a crit, on a hot day, when I was tired and dehydrated, but pretty sure with four to go that I had it in the bag, with my HR pretty close to my max the whole time. So my HR stayed maxed throughout, but my power was declining---does that mean I "quit"?

    At another time, rested, fresh and hydrated, I have almost perfectly paced an effort up a finishing climb (where I believe I could have gone almost no harder for the duration or longer at that power) and my HR didn't reach maximum until about 15 seconds after I crossed the finish line.
    Last edited by Undecided; 06-05-2010 at 11:10 AM.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Undecided
    I don't train by heart rate, but I do typically record it. When people say that your HR is meaningless, I don't think they're necessarily trying to be snide, but rather that they mean that HR is not effort (and not a good proxy for effort), and aren't you really asking about quitting/reducing a level of effort?

    I'm not sure what you mean about "feel[ing] like crap" in this context, but in truly maximal, short efforts, I see a noticeable drop off in power long before the physical discomfort of the effort would make me "stop," and my HR is still increasing at that point unless I started the effort from a pretty high HR. In longer efforts, I don't think that being at maximum heart rate dictates definitively whether I have to quit the current level of power production, but it will almost always mean I would dial it back if there wasn't some good reason for it.

    I have been in the situation where my power output has slowly declined throughout the ten laps of a crit, on a hot day, when I was tired and dehydrated, but pretty sure with four to go that I had it in the bag, with my HR pretty close to my max the whole time. So my HR stayed maxed throughout, but my power was declining---does that mean I "quit"?

    At another time, rested, fresh and hydrated, I have almost perfectly paced an effort up a finishing climb (where I believe I could have gone almost no harder for the duration or longer at that power) and my HR didn't reach maximum until about 15 seconds after I crossed the finish line.

    Interesting info! Thanks.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creakyknees
    The (very) few times that I have hit a true max hr, it was a very short spike (a couple of seconds / a few heartbeats / one or two readout updates on the HR monitor), usually following a very intense effort that left me seeing spots, gasping for air and unable to pedal for several minutes.

    You might be confusing true max hr with "a very hard pace" which could be anything from "threshold" to "vo2" to a short sprint effort...

    Me too..except "unable to pedal for several minutes" is not what I get...Maybe 30seconds to a minute is my 'down-time' until I can resume my efforts, but at a lower exertion level for sure..

    .After several minutes backed-off a little, I can (rarely do, however) get another Max HR spike for a few seconds, if someone really pushes it and I am 'motivated' enough.

    My maximum sustainable HR seems to be about 170 on a good day..That is eye-popping effort on an uphill TT of about an hour...I'll spike into the low 190s, my max, a couple of times, but then I have to 'recover' with reduced effort. I don't have to stop and get off, but I do have to lighten up..

    Don Hanson

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