How to train to be a better climber? - Page 3
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  1. #51
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    Thumbs down

    I'v had some good climbs in my Spin class, it's a really good workout!

    tee hee


  2. #52
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    This is just my own invention. I ride rollers when I cannot ride outside. To simulate climbing, I slightly elevate the front of the rollers to get the right position and lower the air pressure in my tires. It really feels like I am climbing when I do this.

  3. #53

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    If there are no hills near you, do you race on hills? If not, why worry about getting better at them?

    Just curious.

  4. #54
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    Spinervals 7.0 DVD is focused on climbing. It's a pretty good trainer work out!

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by robdamanii
    The problem is I have no decent climbs within 45 minutes (very flat here.)

    For the winter, I'm stuck on the trainer as well.
    In the cold months I work on walking lunges in the gym. I highly recommend them. I do sets of 50. Once I get that down with just body weight, I add a 20 lbs ball/wgt. It will shred the muscles used in climbing.

  6. #56
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    Curious about the folks who dismiss the simulation of hill-work in spin classes. What's the gripe?

    Certainly, many folks in spin have never been on a road bike (including some of the instructors), and there is no doubt, many of these folks would not know how to exert themselves properly or gear their bikes on a true climb... but I am pretty good on hills (I enjoy the hell out of climbing)... and I can get a butt-kicking workout in spin.

    It's what you do with the machine. Some will exert themselves and grow... others will spin mindlessly and just listen to the music. Many of these machines are stable and well balanced with multiple setting options that- in my experience- provide a good simulation ... valuable when one cannot get out on the road.

    ... admittedly, many of the instructors are a joke... but... if you take a machine in the back row, no one really cares if you ignore the ridiculous commands of the instructor. One should fashion his workout based on personal experience and needs. The class merely offers a machine and some reasonably motivating music... you supply the rest.
    Last edited by w4ta; 02-03-2008 at 09:36 PM.

  7. #57
    Beatchin' Technology
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    Climbing on the trainer

    Rob,

    I agree with root, frogge and eric kenney above. I use the trainer in the dark in the winter. In fact, I am going back to it tonight after a month off which I needed to deal with a nagging injury.

    For hills, the 2x20 at 95% are great. Also the Spinervals DVD Hillacious is good. My riding partner and I joke about waiting for the CEO of the bread company to cardiac out. The advantage of the DVD is that it makes you stand which is important when attacking on the hills. Later in the season, when I have some form, I will double the length of the most intense sections of Coach Troy's workout and halve the rest sections. My name for that workout is Hillarious.

    I also have Joe Friel hill DVD which is kind of boring but you do get to see Mr. Periodization...

    The problem for me with the trainer is that even in the hardest segments of the workouts the power demands are nowhere near what you must overcome on real hills. E.g. if you have to climb a half mile, 15% average grade, hill you will find it more demanding than the most grueling trainer workout. Now try a half mile with a 28% pitch at the top...But the trainer workouts do help. So I can understand why many of the replies are off-topic "go out and ride hills."
    U gne n'e' par niseun'

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  8. #58
    Impulse Athletic Coaching
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    Quote Originally Posted by asgelle
    Your body is not in a different position relative to the pedals, everything is just rotated a few degrees around the rear axle, and since muscles are used to ovecome the resistance from the pedals, not gravity, that rotation makes no difference in muscle recruitment. Of course riding up hill feels different, see my earlier post.

    Quote Originally Posted by asgelle
    But really, if the position of the hips and pedals don't change, how could more or different muscles be involved?
    If you are seated, the rotation in your hips does change your position. It's sort of like doing a TT without a TT bike -- getting much lower while seated than you are used to. Training like this for long periods of time is difficult and does recruit slightly different muscles.

    Honestly, the best training for hills that I've found is to find a really hard one and ride up it multiple times with guys who are stronger than you. It's easier to push yourself when you have someone to pace you up the hill. Or just race up it with people who are close to your ability. It hurts like hell, but hills are about learning to suffer, anyways.

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