Riding does nothing for you. - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    All I know is that the 25.5 mile ride I did yesterday that involves three tough 4 minute climbs and a few more moderate ones really wore me out. Afterwards I felt like what a 40 to 50 mile workout would feel like when I was in top form, relatively speaking, back in October. I think I've definitely lost some endurance.

    Right now I have no training schedule. I pick a route, as harpon says, that helps keep the joy and interest, plus remind my legs of the hurt certain hill climbs dish out.

  2. #27
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    All I know is that the 25.5 mile ride I did yesterday that involves three tough 4 minute climbs and a few more moderate ones really wore me out. Afterwards I felt like what a 40 to 50 mile workout would feel like when I was in top form, relatively speaking, back in October. I think I've definitely lost some endurance.

    Right now I have no training schedule. I pick a route, as harpon says, that helps keep the joy and interest, plus remind my legs of the hurt certain hill climbs dish out.

  3. #28
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    That's so normal. I was lucky enough to train at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs when it first opened the winters of '79 and '80 under Eddy B. (No I never made the team)

    But on group rides, he wouldn't let the riders compete in the middle of winter. In a cold climate, you just gotta do the base miles- The air is thick, you take so much longer to warm up and when it's really cold, maybe you never do get warmed up. You can't get out consistently sometimes because of weather- you can't let it psyche you out. Four hours is a long time on the bike in the dead of winter- if not the middle of summer.

  4. #29
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    From the different books i have read they all recommend that during the cold winter months that most rides should be building your aerobic capacity with a few intensity rides thrown in. then once it starts to get warm you start putting in more hours per week with more strength and pain tolerance training. I couldn't go out for my ride today because it was 38 degrees and raining and the roads were icy. No way that i could get anything done in that time with so little light after getting home from school.

    So I think the point is only riding easy all the time will get you no where. Only doing intervals or hard rides all the time will get you no where as well. A proper mix is what's needed.

  5. #30
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    Nothing I have read corresponds anything with temperature and your periodization. I'd even argue that putting in hard efforts in the cold is good training. My first A race is in March. It could very well be in the 30s so I better be used to those conditions if I expect to do well. But I'm no expert.

    Base miles are not easy. They're looooong. Mental toughness is something that needs to be developed. At 700 hours a year, this week (starting yesterday) is my longest at 20.5 hours. Later today I'll likely be doing 4.5 hours on the trainer and I just know that about 90 minutes in I'll start rationalizing as to "why I don't have to do this" and "its just one workout" but pushing through those thoughts prepares you fo the suffering you are sure to endure in order to compete.

    And if you just can't do it, well, you've learned something else about yourself.

    But I'll take 2 hours of intervals over 4.5 hours of zone 1/2 any day.
    Stand For Something.

  6. #31
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    Main reason for not going too hard during a winter ride is to not sweat too much. No matter how effectively your clothes wick sweat, if you get too sweaty you're going to freeze on a downhill or some other low-effort part of the ride. Long, steady effort is best to not end up hypothermic. Depending on how cold it is, of course. Currently single digits here in Colorado, so I'm on the trainer.

  7. #32
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    The Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing

    Quote Originally Posted by George M View Post
    just read in Velo News and I've read it, in some training books, that just going out for a ride doe's nothing for you. If you don't go out and do intervals or sprints, or hill climbs, etc. your basically wasting your time. If you go out for a 4 hour ride, at a slow pace, the only thing you've done is get yourself tired.
    I'm not talking about just going out to smell the roses, like some people do. I'm talking about exercise. I cant believe your not doing anything for yourself, just riding. Are they just talking about racing or getting ready to race?

    I would call Z2 pretty easy riding, Recovery or just plan riding. Your getting your heart rate up, rather than just sitting here, like I am now. I just find it hard to believe that your not gaining anything, just riding. I've gone for 4 and 5 hour rides and when I get back I'm 4 pounds lighter and they say, I'm not gaining anything. Would some of you shed some light on this. I know I must be missing something. Thanks.


    I follow this, and really works. You just need to be patient, something that seems to be lost in our culture. I consider that if you need to build something strong and durable ( your fitness level),it has to be done slowly over years. So intervals make you faster, but most of the people do too much of it...

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pscyclepath View Post
    I read the report, and it's bullshit. Your personal fitness goals will drive how you want to ride and train, but simply being out and active will bring physical improvements. You'll never win the Tour de France or even the local club criterium if all you do is ride your Schwinn cruiser down to the coffee shop and back, you'll want to work hard on endurance and power. Specific goals require specific training, but whatever the goal, get out and ride.

    A bicycle is the only vehicle man has invented that makes you healthier the more you use it.
    I agree. So if I, Mr. Sedentary for 11 years, gets on a bike and pedals, I will see no benefit from it? I call BS on the report, I can vouch that cycling has increased my lung capacity, caused me to loose weight, and built some muscle. If I believed that article, I should have just stayed on the couch. I am not looking to race, but let's face it, any exercise when you are sedentary is better than no exercise.

  9. #34
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    Usually the 3-4 hour easy rides are my way of enjoying the bike. I like short sufferfests too, but sometimes I want to just get out and ride.

  10. #35
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    I think everyone agrees that easy recovery rides are very beneficial at the right time and for the right reasons. But what is absolutely clear, is that "just riding around" will never to allow an individual to reach their optimal performance. Sure you will lose weight, get in shape and feel 100% better than sitting on your couch, but I think we are talking about achieving your potential. That requires some intelligent, speciifc training.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
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  11. #36
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    If you're "just riding around", "doing base miles", or whatever you want to call it, then that;s what you'll get good at.

    Many years ago, my much faster riding buddy told me, "If you keep going out at 18 mph, you'll get better and better. . . at going 18 mph.

    Going slow to get fast. . . now THAT sonds like a training plan!
    Just ride.

  12. #37
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    I get what they're saying, but sometimes we overplan...most runners spend most of their training time just getting in the miles (including some who t=run 2x/day), with only a few workouts/week having a more focused purpose (the long run, tempo, hills).

    The only problem I would see is if you never ride hard or if you always ride hard.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Undecided View Post
    Depends . . . .
    awesome!
    "For me, I don't go the judgmental route. Everyone's got their own story. I go about my life in my own way. I know where I'm going; I know what I want. With that being said, sometimes there's going to be a little humor involved. At first glance, second glance, third glance, you may not get it. That's OK. It's not for you to get. It's for me to enjoy."

  14. #39
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    Might sound obvious but as someone new to this sport are you saying a shorter hill climb would be a quicker way to improve than a longer flat fast ride?

  15. #40
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    Hi I am very new here and have been loving the place. i would also wish to disagree with this report I started riding a bike in Feb. It was a cruiser I got for going to dinner and places with my wife around town ( like 2 to 3 miles ) . I rode that cruiser for a month and while my wife was at work started riding it further and further at a slow pace. Moved to a hybrid bike end of march and today a full carbon cannondale road bike for the last month. Since starting end of march ( and changing my diet of course ) I have lost 83lbs and it is thanks to those slow rides to start so I am disagreeing as well.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by highbrow View Post
    Hi I am very new here and have been loving the place. i would also wish to disagree with this report I started riding a bike in Feb. It was a cruiser I got for going to dinner and places with my wife around town ( like 2 to 3 miles ) . I rode that cruiser for a month and while my wife was at work started riding it further and further at a slow pace. Moved to a hybrid bike end of march and today a full carbon cannondale road bike for the last month. Since starting end of march ( and changing my diet of course ) I have lost 83lbs and it is thanks to those slow rides to start so I am disagreeing as well.
    Congratulations! Remember to keep enjoying the road bike the way you enjoyed the cruiser and don't get too caught up in the tech.

    A lot of people come up to me on their cruisers and say "nice bike" or whatever and honestly, I don't think they realize what they have. A functioning bike that is practical as anything and they can get out to go to a restaurant or bar, sightsee, or stop and smell the roses.

    The one bad thing about the cruiser riders; a lot of them aren't watching where they're going.

    Don't worry about training schedules either. You'll get faster just riding around and then after a period of time, you'll decide whether you want to be more structured to get faster or whether you just want to get out and ride for an hour or a few more. Just ride..
    Last edited by Chris-X; 08-08-2011 at 07:06 AM.

  17. #42
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    thanks Chris for the kind words and advise. I know from my few short months of riding while my road bike is a huge jump up, riding friends road bikes I can tell a huge difference in bars and various other small things, shifters, etc. so I think it maybe time for a small upgrade or two

  18. #43
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    Late to the party, but that's bullshit. A lot of coaches want to portray their own special 'Silver Bullet' solution for getting faster by insisting what can be accomplished on a 5 hour ride can be compressed inside a 2.5 hour ride.

    Everyone talks about efficiency and cramming as much efficiency as possible into limited time.

    What if I enjpy riding my bike for no other purpose than enjoying riding my bike?

    There is no such thing as 'junk miles' for the cyclist who loves to ride.

    Yes, there are 2X20 FTP intervals, etc etc and other assorted protocol to get faster and lots of coaches who think they are uber-mensch.

    Hardly..........

    Even on your easiest ride planned, you will face conditions that make that ride very worthwhile.

  19. #44
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    I love to go out and ride, 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours. Heck being able to spend 4 hours riding a bicycle is a plus in my book. I am blessed with many nice routes. I definitely see ride to ride improvements and since I'm not a racer that is enough for me. There are no flat routes where I live so all the rides include plenty of climbing. So that even a short ride gives me plenty of stress.

  20. #45
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    Likewise.

    Speed will take care of itself via more time in the saddle.

  21. #46
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    I haven't read all the replies but I generally agree with that statement. I wouldn't say that it does absolutely nothing for you but to get real results, you need to push. Intervals and hillwork are what really build fitness. I almost always include some anaerobic training in every ride I do.

  22. #47
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    I don't think I'm capable of going slow enough on a bike to not improve. I always have a desire to go faster, and likewise I always get a good workout. I mean, I pace myself quite carefully, but it's always a high pace for whatever distance.

  23. #48
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    I'd most defintitely say riding does something for you. I ride my bike to work which is about 36km round trip, and there are two monster hills that I ride up. I don't bust my balls, but I have a quick pace for the majority of the ride. I lost 10lbs just riding for 3 months every 3-4 days during the week.

    A colleague of mine lost 50lbs riding his bike in Taiwan every day, no hills.

  24. #49
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    that article targets racers, but unless you are a pro why even bother. also if you are going to get 2nd place at a local race, what's the point really?

    but since this is coaching thread: hills can and will make you work so take those routes with plenty of hills and also smell the roses.
    every 3 seconds, a child dies of hunger. how much did you spend on your bike?

  25. #50
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    The thing I'm noticing here is that the responses seem to be pretty unidirectional. From what I've been reading from Friel, Chapple, Maffetone articles etc. training is a progressive thing. You ride your long base miles to train your slow twitch muscles to use fat primary while using carbs more efficiently. You do your intervals to increase your LT which builds power and speed. You gradually increase the frequency and intensity of the intervals according to monthly time trials. Each month you need to reevaluate your training and adapt. The thing about base is that it takes about 95% longer to develop than power etc for a given period of time. That's not to say that you're going to go out and go from Couch to Cat2 in a season, but you'll be making significant improvement. Every aspect of training seems to have its place and it's up to the individual to fit those pieces together in the correct order at the correct time. It's obviously different if you're interested in sprinting, climbing, long ass distance etc. Sprinters train differently than the climbers even down to their muscle composition etc. There's a lot that goes in to it.
    -Consistently ride every day I'm not working, rain or shine.
    -Ride a century by the end of summer.
    -Complete the High Country Pathway ride (80mile mtb ride in northern MI)
    -Do the Make a Wish Michigan ride (300miles in 3 days)

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