Riding does nothing for you. - Page 3
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  1. #51
    I ride in circles..
    Reputation: ZoSoSwiM's Avatar
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    The benefits of long easy "trash miles" for me have nothing to do with training my muscles. It's about clearing my mind an ignoring the Garmin/powertap for that day. Sometimes a zero goal ride is exactly what is needed. Sometimes these can fit into training.. like 5 hour endurance rides. Sometimes they might not fit.. However just going for a ride is always better than sitting on the couch IMO.

    I've read 101 places that most people can ditch recovery rides... However I know my legs feel like crap the day after a day in which I haven't ridden. So for me just going for a ride helps.

    No training rule is set in stone for everyone..
    ~ Long Live Long Rides~

  2. #52
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    How old is this thread?

    Anyway, I disagree that riding around for 4 hours "does nothing for you."

    I come from a distance running background. The science there says we benefit from high mileage base training. Low intensity, high volume creates adaptive changes in the body, such as increasing capillary density and lowering resting heart rate (while increasing efficiency). It also strengthens connective tissues and prepares the body for higher intensity later in the season, lowering the risk of injury. On the other hand, it's not going to peak your V02 Max, speed or strength -- that requires specificity and intensity. And testosterone levels tend to drop and we run the risk of "overtraining" with 3+ hour daily training over prolonged periods of time. How much of that directly translates from running to cycling? You decide.

  3. #53
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    I've read that the real benefits of long easy riding come once you hit 20+ hour per week, and that those benefits are similar to shorter bouts of high intensity training, with the added benefit of a deep aerobic base. This is how the pros train. Chris Carmichael makes this point in his book. And, in suggesting workouts for the "time crunched cyclist", he recommends almost exclusively threshold workouts and high intensity 3 minute intervals to generate racing fitness.

    Many of us are somewhere between time crunched and 20+ hours a week, and try to get the benefits of a deep base before turning to high intensity work. In my experience, though, it's the high intensity work that wins races.

  4. #54
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    isn't it enough to just enjoy it ?

  5. #55
    Road Racer, Coach, Wrench
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    Lots of racers have an all or nothing mentality. The long easy 4 hour ride has a place in everybodys schedule. It is good for endurance, promotes recovery, ect. On the flip side 4-5 hard rides a weak leave your body in shambles no matter what shape you are in. It will weaken your immune system, weaken your legs, racing ability, make you more tired and the list goes on. Is riding 4 hours everyday best for performance no not really. But for a lot of over zealous athletes, going slower every once in a while will actually make them faster.

  6. #56
    slow hill climber
    Reputation: Ricey155's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Surely if your burning calories in the right zone and not force feeding yourself when you get back home cycling be it fast or slow is good for you ??

    cycling for me is great for the mind and determination pulling yourself around your local run when your dead on your feet is awesome you feel great especially after a day or two rest

    my cycling is the new gym, its free (well except the kit/ bike) all that fresh air in the countryside is priceless and your mind is clear of all the crap going on


    who cares what people write unless you agree with it

  7. #57
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tindrum's Avatar
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    if andy schleck spent a season just going out and riding around, maybe a hundred easy miles a week, his fitness would decrease fairly dramatically. if the average, slightly-overweight american with a largely sedentary lifestyle buys a bike and does that, their fitness will increase fairly dramatically.

    "junk miles" are a concern for only a very small, very competitive number of riders, or people that are very serious about their personal fitness.

  8. #58
    slow hill climber
    Reputation: Ricey155's Avatar
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    think that goes for most people, unless your smashing miles left right and centre

    biking is great and a great free sport forget the gym its all about the bike
    Quote Originally Posted by tindrum View Post
    if andy schleck spent a season just going out and riding around, maybe a hundred easy miles a week, his fitness would decrease fairly dramatically. if the average, slightly-overweight american with a largely sedentary lifestyle buys a bike and does that, their fitness will increase fairly dramatically.

    "junk miles" are a concern for only a very small, very competitive number of riders, or people that are very serious about their personal fitness.

  9. #59
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    Although I am more of a beginner in cycling, continually breaking your limit is the key to getting better. When I used to be involved in auto-racing, my coach would continually push me. For instance, in one course, my fastest lap time might be around 1 min 80 seconds. Then, he would push me a little further, then my lap time would go down to 1 min 72 and so forth.

    I don't find it any different from cycling. When I started 3 months ago, I finished my 17 mile route in a slow, paltry 2 hours. I kept pushing little by little, and now, I can finish that 17 mile route, on average, in 1 hour 10 mins (I recently broke my fastest time by 8 minutes - can finish this route in 1 hour).

    My advice: Gradually, push yourself harder and harder. You'll get faster in no-time.

  10. #60
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    I always push it when I go out and as a result I'm in better condition now then I was twenty years ago. Lung capacity up. Recovery time down. Weight down. I sleep better. I crap bigger. I eat better. And the solo rides gives me a chance to think about what the voices in my head are telling me before actually acting on them.

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