Running for cyclists? - Page 3
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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gervase View Post
    Actually, I think this is flawed. The top bodybuilders WONT run, becuase it breaks down their hard won muscle. So that they can NOT get big, so they usually stationary cycle instead. Like you said the Jarring = 5x body weight. you don't see runners with big bodies, legs, unless they are sprinters.
    Mm i ain't gonna argue but after a serious workout for a body builder recovery is of paramount importance just like with serious cyclists so either of these athletes would stairway from running.
    My point is with your comment than muscle breaks down. im not sure how muscle breaks from exercise without some other degenerative condition.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarbiker View Post
    Of course running will benefit your cycling. Running is by far the best thing you can do to achieve cardiovascular fitness. There is nothing better.
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  3. #53
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    I could be wrong about this, but it seems to me that there are two parts of the equation: power and weight. The running never helped my cycling except to help me lose weight efficiently, so it works on the kg side of the equation. Now, if you're already lean, then the only thing that's going to help gain more power in cycling, it seems to me (esp @ that high an FTP), is trying to gain more power through cycling. That makes intuitive sense.

    But that may not always be true for the non-competitive cyclist. For a guy like myself, I would be a much better cyclist by running off 15 pounds, which is one of my goals for the winter. I could ride it off, but it would take more training time, so in my mind. I'd rather run and lift it off, and then take that general fitness and make it more specific over the winter. Not to say that I won't ride in the interim, but resolving general strength and flexibility issues will make me more able to go faster in the summer.

    YMMV. Greatly.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrumpole View Post
    I could be wrong about this, but it seems to me that there are two parts of the equation: power and weight. The running never helped my cycling except to help me lose weight efficiently, so it works on the kg side of the equation. Now, if you're already lean, then the only thing that's going to help gain more power in cycling, it seems to me (esp @ that high an FTP), is trying to gain more power through cycling. That makes intuitive sense.

    But that may not always be true for the non-competitive cyclist. For a guy like myself, I would be a much better cyclist by running off 15 pounds, which is one of my goals for the winter. I could ride it off, but it would take more training time, so in my mind. I'd rather run and lift it off, and then take that general fitness and make it more specific over the winter. Not to say that I won't ride in the interim, but resolving general strength and flexibility issues will make me more able to go faster in the summer.

    YMMV. Greatly.
    I agree 1000%. I'm a super Clyde who recently added personal fitness / personal training classes to my curriculum at school. My immediate goal is weight loss through proper nutrition and cardio / resistance training. Running is helping me get there better than riding.
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  5. #55
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    I think running may give you a better cardio quicker? but you surely can achieve as good a cardio on the bike. Also you can't really up the strength on running like you can in Cycling, that is to dial up a bigger gear, which makes you push harder.
    Cycling can also be more aerobic, by being able to spin, say 110-120 or more? so going the opposite way of pushing bigger gears.
    I still think too running is NOT good on the joints, at 56years and 90 kg (weights have left me with high bone densitiy and still some heavy muscle) I CANT run, it does hurt my knees, and don't want to set my self up for a hip replacement.
    I mentioned before about the jarring of the muscle, and that top body builders wont' do that because it breaks down muscle tissue. it also breaks down other tissue, and it used to be a thing in the 70's where machines would vibrate the fat of you, (does any one remember these?)
    Running may benefit younger people more? For me I can't consider it because of above, but I really think you can achieve the same thing, on the bike.

  6. #56
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    I want to start running so that I am better for cyclocross season There is more running in those races than what you think. It's all about endurance
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  7. #57
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    running has been awesome for my biking....helps keep a winter engine that cycling never could.

  8. #58
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    Tower running

    You said you have forty minutes to run.

    Run two steps at a time up a 150 meter tower and take the elevator down.

    Five minutes up, three minutes down.

    Total of five repetitions.

    You said your mass is about 77 kg with clothes. So, you would average about 377 watts on the ascents based only on moving your body to a higher elevation.

    I bet it improves some aspects of your cycling.

  9. #59
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    I always knew running would be harder than cycling,but wow, did I realize it today. I tried to see how well i could tackle a six mile course. I am not a runner at all. Couldn't even do the 2 mile run for basic training 15 years ago, if I remember correctly is 15:45 for age 19? Missed it by 10 seconds on my best run.

    Anyway, I cycle on a regular basis when time allows and can do about 16 to 17avg depending on traffic. Higher in group rides. I'll keep my heart rate about 155 to 160bpm on solo rides when I am not pushing.

    Today I tried to do some running just to keep the fitness up, Don't like riding in sub 60 temps. Just isn't enjoyable for me, My heart rate was jumping up to 170 pretty quick and my hips was bothering me. Does that mean I have a bad running form? Knees, doesn't bother me. Just my hips. I was walking funny for about four hours afterwards.

    I am about 195 at 5'10"
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  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggdaddy View Post
    I always knew running would be harder than cycling,but wow, did I realize it today. I tried to see how well i could tackle a six mile course. I am not a runner at all. Couldn't even do the 2 mile run for basic training 15 years ago, if I remember correctly is 15:45 for age 19? Missed it by 10 seconds on my best run.

    Anyway, I cycle on a regular basis when time allows and can do about 16 to 17avg depending on traffic. Higher in group rides. I'll keep my heart rate about 155 to 160bpm on solo rides when I am not pushing.

    Today I tried to do some running just to keep the fitness up, Don't like riding in sub 60 temps. Just isn't enjoyable for me, My heart rate was jumping up to 170 pretty quick and my hips was bothering me. Does that mean I have a bad running form? Knees, doesn't bother me. Just my hips. I was walking funny for about four hours afterwards.

    I am about 195 at 5'10"
    I got into cycling after years of being a competitive runner. Even after no longer being competiive, I used to go on runs as my primary exercise and only rode a bike to get around town. This changed [ironically] when I injured my heel in a bike crash (slid out on sand in an intersection aftering sprinting to make a yellow light and slammed my heel into the tarmac). This prevented me from running for about 3 weeks but I was able to pedal pain free, so started cycling to keep my running fitness up and ended up never turning back...

    Due to the higher impact on joints associated with running, I think it requires a lot more gradual "buildup time" to get into running compared to cycling. Nowadays I go on runs on rain days to avoid frequent drivetrain cleanings (what can I say, I'm lazy...)

    Last Christmas I went back home and went on some runs with my old friends from my college track team. Since I was in good aerobic shape and low weight from cycling I was able to keep up, buy my legs were ridiculously sore for days as a result because the muscle groups used in running and cycling are so different. I think this problem is especially bad if you're in good aerobic shape from cycling but your legs aren't used to pounding of running-- your lungs are able to carry you but your legs aren't used to it. IMO this is worse than starting running after being generally sedentary. In that you'll probably get winded and give up before you end up doing too much damage

    In the future I am looking into doing both running and cycling for fitness. I personally have find slow "walking" hikes boring unless I actually run the trails -- allowing me to compress the sightseeing into less time and get a workout in. I'm not particularly interested in doing either competetiviely though.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotonFreak View Post
    Due to the higher impact on joints associated with running, I think it requires a lot more gradual "buildup time" to get into running compared to cycling.
    I would say the same to anyone who wants to get started in running from cycling.
    I personally run three times a week during the fall/winter and taper off to once a week during the spring/summer. I find that running in the "off season" keeps me fit and breaks up the workout routine so things don't get too tedious. Also, running is easier to do when visiting family on the holidays.

  12. #62
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    There are advantages and disadvantages to it. It is very easy to train your aerobic system running. So if your limiter is not the legs but getting oxygen to everything track workouts, and runs shorter than 5k can be miracle workers. Running is also much more painful muscularly in my opinion. I find that running 5ks and 10ks fast (races usually) teaches me how to suffer more than most things on the bike from a muscular pain perspective. You can also run in the dark safely! Huge advantage in my opinion for the time crunched athlete who hates bike trainers.

    Disadvantages include destroyed knees, loss of specificity among others. Overall though I think that if utilized properly it can greatly improve your cycling.

  13. #63
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    The "Jarring", is what breaks down the muscle, which is why top body builders will not run.

  14. #64
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    I think cycling in big gears requires more strength than running, I think the pain that you may experience will be to do with the transferance of the impact through your muscle, you feel it every time you take big strides.
    Riding in the dark? I use big lights, 900 lumens, problem solved, far safer.

  15. #65
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    I used to be a runner, quit, got way out of shape, then switched to cycling. I just started running again. I ride 8000-10000 miles a year so I don't need to run for exercise, and I don't run to improve my cycling. I do it because at my age, I really need to be doing some type of weight-bearing exercise.

  16. #66
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    I'm not sure if I am repeating anything from previous posts....

    I have started 5km runs this month, in addition to my regular trainer sessions and playing ice hockey once a week. I have definitely noticed an improvement in my overall strength and conditiioning. Will it translate into better and more efficient cycling? Probably. I'm no doctor or expert, but I believe varied training will create a stronger and fitter body, rather than focusing on a single activity. I absolutely love cycling, but for my future fitness and to avoid repetitive-stress type injuries, I will work in a couple of runs a week to compliment my road cycling.

    Besides, a 40-min run is much easier to squeeze into an hour lunch at the office....
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  17. #67
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    Dunno

  18. #68
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    This was helpful thanks

  19. #69
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    Cycle in the summer, run in the winter

    I weight train, shoot baskets, and run indoors on a track when I can no longer cycle outdoors on a regularly. In the spring, when I can put together at least a couple of rides a week, I'll stop running.

    I've got a trainer, but I only use it for bike set-up and shoe/cleat adjustments. I find the trainer is too static. It doesn't move under the rider.
    My 1996 Miata is my other "road bike"

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr_John View Post
    I used to be a runner, quit, got way out of shape, then switched to cycling. I just started running again. I ride 8000-10000 miles a year so I don't need to run for exercise, and I don't run to improve my cycling. I do it because at my age, I really need to be doing some type of weight-bearing exercise.
    Winter here in the Midwest cuts down on my cycling times/miles. So I try a winter routine. Last winter I tried swimming laps as a winter sport. That didn't prove to be my cup of tea... thank God for a short winter last year.

    I am also a senior... and [if I remember correctly] the CDC recommends two weight training sessions and/plus 2 to 2 ½ hours of aerobic exercise per week. Cycling more than covers the aerobic in summer... maybe even in most of the off season.

    But I've already added a walk/run [3K] to my activity's [I don't like to call my cycling exercise.... cause I'd look like an exercise junkie... instead of just a cycling junkie]. I think the walk/run will keep me active enough through winter. I do the walk/run instead of just jogging... to preserve my hips and knees.

    I've been doing some light weight training at home. But think I will try going to a gym twice a week or so this winter. Being retired... I think I like the idea of just getting out more on bad weather days.

    I have this idea that I should work on my balance. From little tidbits I read I get the idea that balance [or the lack of good balance] is what slows seniors. Not poor aerobic health, or muscle weakness, or decreased reflexes. Last year I “trained” using a Wii [with the fitness board]. I really think it improved my feeling of general health, or well being. I might look into a yoga... or kung fu classes or something this winter.

  21. #71
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    After twenty years of being sedentary I put in 7000 miles on the bike with nothing worse than a saddle sore. First mile of jogging I pull my hamstring. Jogging sucks.

  22. #72
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    Jogging does suck! Do what I do; on the days I don't ride I use a versa-climber for 15-20 mins, then do chin-ups, push-ups, and flutter-kicks. Repeat 3x.

  23. #73
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    Stretching should not be neglected. Most cyclists don't do it enough and it will cause injuries when you try and do other stuff. Cycling is kind, you usually just lose power and can't have as aggressive a position. Stretch..... (At least this is what I find is usually the reason muscles pet pulled doing a simple jog, not a medical expert)

  24. #74
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    I have been running the past two winters. I just started running again this fall.
    Imho it's much better than sitting on the couch doing nothing, and I can only take so much of the trainer before I have to get outside.
    Last year was probably my best year ever at age 44. I think I can attribute some of that to maintaining cardiovascular fitness over the past winter. I ran at least 2-3 times a week, and either got outside to bike or biked on the trainer for 2-3 times a week also. It also helped me control my weight, running burns quite a few calories when you hold a decent pace.
    I would not go strictly with running however if my goal was bike racing.
    For recreational cyclists and those looking for general fitness, why not?
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  25. #75
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    My coach has me doing twice-a-week hiking & running for the first month of the next-year-race training. Easy stuff. Exploring. Having fun. About 45m to 1 hour. Use different muscle groups. Get some weight loaded on the ol' bones. I truly enjoy it, almost no structure other than "get out and have some fun."

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