Running for cyclists?
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 102
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    98

    Running for cyclists?

    Hi,

    I am interested to know if running has any benefits for competitive cyclists. Would running for 40 minutes a week be a replacement for a 1h20m zone 2 ride?

    Some info about me:
    Cat 3
    168lbs
    FTP 320w

    My challenge is in losing weight, and i would like to get my FTP to 330-340w for the next season. I may be close to the FTP goal already, haven't tested since last winter.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: bikerjulio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    7,492
    It's funny. When I was a runner we used to hear about "cross training". In all my time in cycling, I've never heard of running as being good training. Only perhaps when conditions are too bad to ride. Maybe "core" exercises, and I have a friend who swears by yoga.

    So though having done both running and cycling, and for a brief painful period done both, my feeling is that running does not help. Unless you are into tri, of course. But that's a whole other thing.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: redlizard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    396
    My coach enthusiastically discourages running, saying it will keep me from becoming the best cyclist I can be. I'm sure he's right, but I sneak them in anyway, since I'm really a runner with a cycling problem. Specificity seems to be the key argument against it and anything not cycling specific would seem to be NOT the best use of limited time & energy.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    451

    my thought

    is that if you are a 'lean' cyclist there is every chance you may increase your weight a little due to an increase in muscle density due to the impact of running. i've heard that each strike can be around 5 x your body weight, so you could imagine the development required to be 'conditioned' for running.
    i run 2 x 40min sessions per week and have gained leg strength and i have found this beneficial for cycling. albeit i don't race nor do i spend lots of hours riding as we have 15month old twins.
    if energy conservation is of high importance to give 100% to cycling, running may tire you too much????

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    91
    Yeah, i find running helps me at

    1. Climb standing
    2. Breathing Rhythm
    3. Longer duration at Threshold

    But it won't help you increase your FTP by much. If you really want to lose weight, you need to run longer than 40mins.

  6. #6
    Cycling Coach
    Reputation: Alex_Simmons/RST's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,734
    I wouldn't suggest running as a way to improve cycling fitness.

    It is however a good way to help with managing any potential bone mineral density issues.

  7. #7
    dot
    dot is offline
    badass
    Reputation: dot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    383
    A. Krasnov, the first coach of I. Kalentieva promotes xc running for xc (and purportedly for cx) racing in mild doses.

  8. #8
    I ride in circles..
    Reputation: ZoSoSwiM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4,645
    Well some running for XC or CX races makes sense since they sometimes need to run up hills. How often do cyclists get off their bikes and run though?
    ~ Long Live Long Rides~

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,745
    Compared to nothing it'll have some benefits but that doesn't make it an efficient use of one's time.

    If you're just looking for a change of pace off the bike for a 40 min workout.......cross country skiing or skating is much better. (either on ice or roller blades)

  10. #10
    dot
    dot is offline
    badass
    Reputation: dot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    383
    Quote Originally Posted by Hank Stamper
    Compared to nothing it'll have some benefits but that doesn't make it an efficient use of one's time.

    If you're just looking for a change of pace off the bike for a 40 min workout.......cross country skiing or skating is much better. (either on ice or roller blades)

    running is most effective way to spend time exercising. It takes no more time than just getting out and go running. Getting to an xc skiing course takes time and getting ready to ski takes time plues skis need some time to get them ready, for me it's 1-1.5 hours one way and 20-40 min for skis. Getting to a skating rink takes time, getting dressed for skating takes time and so on.

    Running and cycling (indoor in particular!) are the cheapest sports timewise.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,745
    Quote Originally Posted by dot
    running is most effective way to spend time exercising. It takes no more time than just getting out and go running. Getting to an xc skiing course takes time and getting ready to ski takes time plues skis need some time to get them ready, for me it's 1-1.5 hours one way and 20-40 min for skis. Getting to a skating rink takes time, getting dressed for skating takes time and so on.

    Running and cycling (indoor in particular!) are the cheapest sports timewise.
    Good lord. Aside from missing the point the other funny part is suggesting indoor cycling as you're contridicting yourself. Unless you think everyone has an indoor track in their back yard.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    98
    What about the calorie burning aspect of running?

    If i am trying to lose weight would a 60 minute running session 1x per week help?

    Also, what about running with the treadmill on an incline to emphasize more cyclist-specific muscles?

  13. #13
    dot
    dot is offline
    badass
    Reputation: dot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    383
    Quote Originally Posted by Hank Stamper
    Good lord. Aside from missing the point the other funny part is suggesting indoor cycling as you're contridicting yourself. Unless you think everyone has an indoor track in their back yard.
    when I run I just get out of my block of flats and go running, no need for any track. When I go riding I just get out and ride. Running is fun and distraction from cycling for those who can cope with it. I can't, I ride rollers.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,745
    Quote Originally Posted by soulfly_nyc
    What about the calorie burning aspect of running?

    If i am trying to lose weight would a 60 minute running session 1x per week help?

    Also, what about running with the treadmill on an incline to emphasize more cyclist-specific muscles?
    You should be able to google calorie burn rates for running and other things. They won't be accurate at all on an absolute basis because if varies greatly from person to person but for purposes of comparing one activity to another the info will be good enough.

  15. #15
    orlin03
    Reputation: orlin03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    319
    Quote Originally Posted by soulfly_nyc
    What about the calorie burning aspect of running?

    If i am trying to lose weight would a 60 minute running session 1x per week help?

    Also, what about running with the treadmill on an incline to emphasize more cyclist-specific muscles?
    As much as I hate it, I get a lot of my workouts through the treadmill in the winter. I find the most effective method for both fitness and time-conservation is to use lots of varying incline. Taking it up to 15% for intervals helps strengthen the hips, quads, and calves, lowers the impact, and burns more calories than you can imagine. Recover and repeat, just like you would do for a bike workout; you may find 20-30 minutes of this gives better results than 60 minutes of regular "treadmilling".

  16. #16
    banned
    Reputation: harpon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    69
    What's your racing schedule like and level of experience and seriousness?

    If you are years into racing and going fulltime, and migrating to warm areas or living there to race and train- running probably isn't time that well spent.

    But if you are just starting- or a club rider or live in a colder climate- running can be really great if you ENJOY it.

    it's great for aerobic cardio-vascular fitness- great for climbing, on a bicycle, but may not do much for that budding match sprinter.

    I always liked to be riding better, and ended up finally quitting Cross Country and Track in high school over it-
    but that was long ago and I was glad I had that training base.

  17. #17
    Fax Transport Specialist
    Reputation: black_box's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    468
    Quote Originally Posted by soulfly_nyc
    If i am trying to lose weight would a 60 minute running session 1x per week help?
    Be careful when you transition from biking to running. Your cardio will transfer over somewhat but your bones, joints, and muscles will need time to adapt to the impact. Start with short runs and build up slowly.

  18. #18
    Dynastar
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    88
    Steve,

    I hope all is well. Glad to see that you moved up to Cat 3. As a sample of 1, I usually lose a few pounds cycling, but I need to run to really get the weight off. Last year, because of a foot injury, I did not run at all. And the weight never came off, even though I was riding a lot and probably the fastest I have ever been -with the obvious exception of climbing. (One of the reasons I did not race MTBs with the guys) Good thing the majority of my rides have been on LI.

    Again, for me, I find that running helps my cycling mainly because it helps me lose/ keep weight off. It also gives me a mental break, especially when I am training a lot. But it is not going to help you increase your power, may even reduce it a bit if you miss a key workouts to run. However, assuming you lose weight, your power/weight ratio will be better and that in itself will make you faster. Plus, as mentioned before, it will help build bone strength.

    To give you a little piece of mind. I was reading an article in Cycle Sport over the summer and the trainer for bBox requires her athletes to run.

    Chris

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    188
    Try it for a month and see for yourself. I started running 1-2 times a week for 30 minutes each time, about 500 feet of elevation gain over 3 miles. Has increased my cardiovascular fitness and my climbing is much better on my bike. Just get some good comfortable running shoes and start out easy as your legs could get really sore if not used to the running-impact thing. Tri people are animals and they do it all. Lance runs and you know how he did 7 times and almost an 8th.
    Last edited by singlespeedbuss; 01-16-2011 at 10:12 PM.
    Don`t let technology stand in the way of progress, ride a 1 gear bike.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Hughsdad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    348
    I think it depends on your goals. For the OP, as others have said, I don't think it will do much for his FTP, because of specificity. On the other hand, I'm a great believer in cross training, for many reasons, some of which have been mentioned:

    -bone density, a real issue for cyclists
    -weight loss. The body & its fat storage likes routine, is my armchair understanding. Mixing it up with variety, throwing in training that your body must adapt to, can prompt greater weight loss.
    -variety
    -general athleticism
    -training partners. Often different ones than I might ride with.
    -time/convenience. A run workout, or calisthenics, yoga, a trip to the gym, etc. can often be fit in when a ride cannot, for whatever reason.

    As for comparing running and cycling, I think I've read in various places that running roughly equates with cycling at a 1:3 or 1:4 ratio. In other words, a 10K run would approximately equal 30-40K on the bike.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: atimido's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    238
    If you're concerned about bone density, you should read this article and pay close attention to the last few paragraphs. There is some good discussion about what you are taking-in during your ride, and who really should be concerned about bone density issues.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/0...or-your-bones/

    While I am not a big fan of running, I do like to do some other types of workouts when I am not riding my bike. Some exercises I do include pull-ups, pushups, lunges with two 35lb free-weights, and squats/step-ups with the 35lb weights.

    I would also note that in terms of running, my friend and I have just started riding together again since last October. He spent most of his time training for a marathon over the past few months and has stayed off his bike, while I spent my time riding the exercise bike, doing my workout above, and riding my rollers. We have ridden together twice this month, and both times I have dropped him pretty bad. The first time he did well, but lost a lot of endurance after a small climb. Yesterday, we did a 60 mile ride and it got to the point where we needed to slow down significantly so he could make it home. I'm not saying that running isn't good for you, but I'm not sure it is going to help your cycling ability any. I would also agree that you are definitely not going to burn as many calories running, as you would riding a bike on an indoor trainer or rollers for a similar period of time.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: redlizard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    396
    Quote Originally Posted by atimido
    I would also agree that you are definitely not going to burn as many calories running, as you would riding a bike on an indoor trainer or rollers for a similar period of time.
    I think you got this backwards. You definitely will burn more calories running than you will riding a bike for any given amount of time. Depending on your pace, fitness and ability, you can burn up to 50% more calories when running vs. cycling. You generally don't run for nearly as long, so you might burn more calories on a training ride, but you won't burn more per hour.

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Hughsdad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    348
    atimido: thanks for the link. I take calcium daily, but maybe I should be adding it to my training fluids.

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: atimido's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    238
    Quote Originally Posted by redlizard
    I think you got this backwards. You definitely will burn more calories running than you will riding a bike for any given amount of time. Depending on your pace, fitness and ability, you can burn up to 50% more calories when running vs. cycling. You generally don't run for nearly as long, so you might burn more calories on a training ride, but you won't burn more per hour.
    Oh, I'm sure as long as you don't run at a turtle's pace like I do.

  25. #25
    Mad-one...
    Reputation: Oasisbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    356
    Cycling is best for me because I enjoy it immensely. It is an addiction. I hate running. It bores me and it hurts my knees. A close friend of mine runs marathons and is addicted to it. He has never ridden a bike. What I'm trying to say is that the best way to lose weight is to find what you love and do it. If you like running then it may be good to mix it up during the week purely for some variety. Id say (roughly) that reaching a percentage of your Vo2 max in any discipline for the same amount of time will be an equivalent workout as far as losing weight is concerned. One will be a higher impact though. My 2c...

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.