Winter Weight Training for Strength not Mass? - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 51 to 71 of 71
  1. #51
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    333
    Agreed.. Very difficult to add only lean muscle without adding some fat and h2o retention. It seems that we are either naturally expanding, contracting, or remaining the same. Dropping body fat AND adding lean muscle at the same time is incredibly difficult.. Unless, one starts playing games, but they don't bode well for endurance sports and that person has other serious issues to contend with.

    I'm personally enjoying getting back into the gym with more consistency as of late. Diet is still balanced and coming in around 3,800 - 4,100 calories and I have not seen anything measurable on the scale over the past couple of months. Calories will be adjusted soon and I also plan to do a bf analysis in a few weeks to see if that has changed.

  2. #52
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nealric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    6,125
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    Body Building and strength training aren't exactly the same thing... There are strength athletes, that I would consider as strength training, and they don't look much at all like body builders. Then there are oly lifters, a different sport again, with weight classes and dynamic lifts. Body builders are doing something completely different, at no time are they being asked to lift heavy things, or even to lift light things a great many times. Using strength training for other sports, regardless of the sport, is something, once again, even more so completely different. Specificity becomes god.

    And, science is good.
    It's a common myth that bodybuilders aren't strong. A lot of this comes from the cut cycle they go into for competitions. Bodybuilders at competitions are severely dehydrated and have been fasting for weeks- so they are relatively weak at that moment. However, their training is all about heavy lifts. There is a lot of overlap between bodybuilders and power lifters (many have done both). The reason olympic lifters look different is that olympic lifts are heavily dependent on leg and core strength, while body building style lifts are much more upper-body centered. Also, heavy weight olympic lifters don't have to care about bodyfat percentage (like bodybuilders do), so they can err on the side of over-nutrition.

    Another difference is the genetics that excel. For most competitive weight lifting, it is an advantage to have a big torso and short limbs. But this is not an ideal form for bodybuilding, which idealizes the more lanky greek statue aesthetic. The body builder's muscles may be just as strong, but the physics of leverage dictates that they won't be able to lift as much as a shorter limbed person of equal strength.

  3. #53
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jspharmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,229
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    Body Building and strength training aren't exactly the same thing... There are strength athletes, that I would consider as strength training, and they don't look much at all like body builders. Then there are oly lifters, a different sport again, with weight classes and dynamic lifts. Body builders are doing something completely different, at no time are they being asked to lift heavy things, or even to lift light things a great many times. Using strength training for other sports, regardless of the sport, is something, once again, even more so completely different. Specificity becomes god.

    And, science is good.
    You are way off base regarding bodybuilders. I've known guys that were both competitive bodybuilders and powerlifters at the same time. In fact a friend was the teen world record holder in squats and subsequently won a bodybuilding competition. When I was bodybuilding, I would routinely leg press 900 lbs for sets of 8 and 1100 lbs for sets of 5. I would do one arm dumbell row with 150 lbs.

    Go to a gym and watch some bodybuilders. They are lifting big weights. I look funny to them doing sets of 10-12 reps with lighter weight than they use.

  4. #54
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,476
    Quote Originally Posted by nealric View Post
    It's a common myth that bodybuilders aren't strong. A lot of this comes from the cut cycle they go into for competitions. Bodybuilders at competitions are severely dehydrated and have been fasting for weeks- so they are relatively weak at that moment. However, their training is all about heavy lifts. There is a lot of overlap between bodybuilders and power lifters (many have done both). The reason olympic lifters look different is that olympic lifts are heavily dependent on leg and core strength, while body building style lifts are much more upper-body centered. Also, heavy weight olympic lifters don't have to care about bodyfat percentage (like bodybuilders do), so they can err on the side of over-nutrition.

    Another difference is the genetics that excel. For most competitive weight lifting, it is an advantage to have a big torso and short limbs. But this is not an ideal form for bodybuilding, which idealizes the more lanky greek statue aesthetic. The body builder's muscles may be just as strong, but the physics of leverage dictates that they won't be able to lift as much as a shorter limbed person of equal strength.
    Im not sure why you quote me in your post? I never said body builders aren't strong and I could care less if they are... What I said is that they aren't asked to lift heavy weights or light weights or anything at all. What they are asked to do in their sport is pose. Body builders, like other models, are meat. A strength athlete is being asked to lift weights in a competition. They train very differently. The excess calorie surplus is irrelevant for a strength athlete. They care about how much they can lift not how lean they are. My point is that specificity is what really matters in regards to a sport like CYCLING.

    OK, genetics matter for every sport a really lot. What is your point? And what the F is "over-nutrition?"

    The point of this thread is whether or not lifting will make you ride a bike faster? The literature is fuzzy at best and the input I'm getting combined with my outside reading and consulting with local experts has me rethinking my approach... I'm base training right now... I'm not sure how much time and energy I'm willing to give to lifting based on what I am learning...
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  5. #55
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,476
    Quote Originally Posted by jspharmd View Post
    You are way off base regarding bodybuilders. I've known guys that were both competitive bodybuilders and powerlifters at the same time. In fact a friend was the teen world record holder in squats and subsequently won a bodybuilding competition. When I was bodybuilding, I would routinely leg press 900 lbs for sets of 8 and 1100 lbs for sets of 5. I would do one arm dumbell row with 150 lbs.

    Go to a gym and watch some bodybuilders. They are lifting big weights. I look funny to them doing sets of 10-12 reps with lighter weight than they use.
    In what way am I "way off base?" Please be specific. Your reply doesn't make sense otherwise. How much you can lift is completely irrelevant to being a body builder. Completely... What matters is your physique. How you get there can be similar, but it is irrelevant. You are judged, you are not competing in a way that makes things clear, like someone lifted more weight than you...

    How does that translate into the kind of specificity that makes you go faster on a bicycle? Please, again, be specific... Because I am learning more and more how irrelevant this is to riding a bike.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  6. #56
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jspharmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,229
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    In what way am I "way off base?" Please be specific. Your reply doesn't make sense otherwise. How much you can lift is completely irrelevant to being a body builder. Completely... What matters is your physique. How you get there can be similar, but it is irrelevant. You are judged, you are not competing in a way that makes things clear, like someone lifted more weight than you...

    How does that translate into the kind of specificity that makes you go faster on a bicycle? Please, again, be specific... Because I am learning more and more how irrelevant this is to riding a bike.
    The context of lifting heavy weights in this thread relates to whether or not you will gain mass (sometimes unwanted by cyclists). You said bodybuilders aren't asked to lift anything. That they are judged by meat. How you get that meat directly relates to how much weight you lift. So, if you want to be a competitive bodybuilder, you are indirectly asked to lift heavy weights. This in turn related to the topic of mass and helping or hurting cycling.

    Therefore, you are WAY off base regarding bodybuilders. They are indeed asked to lift heavy weights to gain mass. They are also asked (or at least used to be asked) to lift lighter weights for more repetitions when they are "cutting up" for a competition.

    Hope this helps.

  7. #57
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,476
    Quote Originally Posted by jspharmd View Post
    The context of lifting heavy weights in this thread relates to whether or not you will gain mass (sometimes unwanted by cyclists). You said bodybuilders aren't asked to lift anything. That they are judged by meat. How you get that meat directly relates to how much weight you lift. So, if you want to be a competitive bodybuilder, you are indirectly asked to lift heavy weights. This in turn related to the topic of mass and helping or hurting cycling.

    Therefore, you are WAY off base regarding bodybuilders. They are indeed asked to lift heavy weights to gain mass. They are also asked (or at least used to be asked) to lift lighter weights for more repetitions when they are "cutting up" for a competition.

    Hope this helps.
    What would help is a video or link where a title goes to the strongest bodybuilding competitor. Maybe even a judge asking them how much they bench, squat or Deadlift? Then I might understand why I'm WAY off base? Until then, there are different and very specific forms of training for different strength sports. Strength athletes, people who win events because they can lift more, don't generally care much about adding extra bulk unless they compete in weight classes. Endurance athletes, regardless of the sport, will be concerned with adding useless weight because it will hurt your performance.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  8. #58
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: jspharmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,229
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    What would help is a video or link where a title goes to the strongest bodybuilding competitor. Maybe even a judge asking them how much they bench, squat or Deadlift? Then I might understand why I'm WAY off base? Until then, there are different and very specific forms of training for different strength sports. Strength athletes, people who win events because they can lift more, don't generally care much about adding extra bulk unless they compete in weight classes. Endurance athletes, regardless of the sport, will be concerned with adding useless weight because it will hurt your performance.
    I think you're arguing a different argument. Nobody ever said that bodybuilders compete my lifting. Somehow you seem to think that because bodybuilders don't compete by lifting weights, that they don't lift heavy weights. This is illogical. Some of us just chose to point it out. Unfortunately, we haven't done a good job of pointing it out to you, because you still don't realize that they lift heavy weights whether they do it in competition or not.

    Sorry I couldn't help you understand and aknowledge this.

  9. #59
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    8,105
    OK, let's sum this up: Generally speaking, the way body builders lift is different from the way power lifters lift. Some power lifters look like bodybuilders. And some bodybuilders are very strong. And we know that different ways of lifting can produce different results.

    So...

    Assuming that a cyclist wants to lift, what is the best way to lift?

    X sets of Y

    X=?
    Y=?


    I like the 5x5. I cannot find the study now but I recall something indicating that 5X5 squats *after* a longer workout actually improves V02max and TT times.

  10. #60
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,476
    Quote Originally Posted by Local Hero View Post
    OK, let's sum this up: Generally speaking, the way body builders lift is different from the way power lifters lift. Some power lifters look like bodybuilders. And some bodybuilders are very strong. And we know that different ways of lifting can produce different results.

    So...

    Assuming that a cyclist wants to lift, what is the best way to lift?

    X sets of Y

    X=?
    Y=?


    I like the 5x5. I cannot find the study now but I recall something indicating that 5X5 squats *after* a longer workout actually improves V02max and TT times.
    Hahaha! Yes, perfect! I can't rep you because I have repped you before apparently... I must spread it around.

    Right. You will add mass to add strength once you pass initial adaptation. How much you want is the question. I'm learning mountains from here and from reading everything I can find, I'll ask for suggestions for further reading again? The lifting suggestions I'm reading from Chapple and Friel seem to be general fitness and core strength focused, like the stuff Mark Verstagen writes about in his Core Performance series. With the exception of leg presses, it seems strength or bodybuilding types of lifting are counterproductive. The jury is out on Plyos? Albeit I'm sure you will get the bone density there if you struggle to run like I do... But even moderate intensity Plyos are a formula for injury (although I've never had that happen in years of doing them, I still get it). I'm thinking base building and dropping some weight on the bike is a more productive use of time... At 6'2" and 180 I'd think 5-10 pounds?
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  11. #61
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nealric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    6,125
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    Im not sure why you quote me in your post? I never said body builders aren't strong and I could care less if they are... What I said is that they aren't asked to lift heavy weights or light weights or anything at all. What they are asked to do in their sport is pose. Body builders, like other models, are meat. A strength athlete is being asked to lift weights in a competition. They train very differently. The excess calorie surplus is irrelevant for a strength athlete. They care about how much they can lift not how lean they are. My point is that specificity is what really matters in regards to a sport like CYCLING.

    OK, genetics matter for every sport a really lot. What is your point? And what the F is "over-nutrition?"

    The point of this thread is whether or not lifting will make you ride a bike faster? The literature is fuzzy at best and the input I'm getting combined with my outside reading and consulting with local experts has me rethinking my approach... I'm base training right now... I'm not sure how much time and energy I'm willing to give to lifting based on what I am learning...
    As others said, while bodybuilders are judged by appearance, the way to gain the appearance they are judged upon is lifting heavy weights. And I was disputing the claim that their training is very different from power lifters.

    "Over nutrition" is simply eating more nutrients than required to gain lean muscle mass. A heavy weight olympic lifter can be competitive at 20% bodyfat. A body builder can not so needs to be very careful to consume only the amount of nutrients to gain/sustain muscle mass.

    As for cycling, I agree that the case for weight training is a bit fuzzy. Based on morphology, however, it appears that track sprinters absolutely MUST do strength training to be competitive (squat 'till you drop!), while it is probably more or less optional for super-endurance athletes. This bears out in running too. Sprinters are very muscular while marathoners are long and lean.

    But I think the bottom line for a casual racer is that lifting certainly can't hurt. You won't gain enough mass to slow you down unless you really get into lifting over a period of several years.

  12. #62
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    8,105
    Quote Originally Posted by nealric View Post
    As others said, while bodybuilders are judged by appearance, the way to gain the appearance they are judged upon is lifting heavy weights. And I was disputing the claim that their training is very different from power lifters.
    There are multiple sources which say the X sets of Y can vary depending on whether someone wants to train for strength or size. When I googled "lift for strength vs lift for size" this came up:

    If someone wants to improve his 1-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press or squat strength, he should be training with loads very close to maximum weight with fewer repetitions to gain maximal strength. On the other hand, if someone wants to get a larger chest or thigh muscles, he would want to train with higher volumes (sets + reps) and less weight to elicit a growth response.
    Men's Health - Power Training - The Program - Strength Versus Size Gains


    As for cycling, I agree that the case for weight training is a bit fuzzy. Based on morphology, however, it appears that track sprinters absolutely MUST do strength training to be competitive (squat 'till you drop!), while it is probably more or less optional for super-endurance athletes. This bears out in running too.
    I come from a running background. And I remember an article 10 years ago which said that the then-dominant Ethiopian and Kenyan runners do not lift. But they do run hills and do plenty of plyos.

  13. #63
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nealric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    6,125
    Quote Originally Posted by Local Hero View Post
    There are multiple sources which say the X sets of Y can vary depending on whether someone wants to train for strength or size. When I googled "lift for strength vs lift for size" this came up:

    If someone wants to improve his 1-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press or squat strength, he should be training with loads very close to maximum weight with fewer repetitions to gain maximal strength. On the other hand, if someone wants to get a larger chest or thigh muscles, he would want to train with higher volumes (sets + reps) and less weight to elicit a growth response.
    Men's Health - Power Training - The Program - Strength Versus Size Gains
    I wouldn't take Men's health as a very serious strength training guide. While there is certainly considerable debate about the precise number of "ideal" reps for various outcomes, it's pretty much impossible to increase your muscle mass without also seeing strength gains. You can, to a limited degree, increase strength without gaining much mass (increase maximum muscle fiber recruitment), but you eventually hit a wall and your muscles have to increase in size to get stronger.

    If the training for mass and strength were so different, you wouldn't see the crossover between power lifters and bodybuilders.

  14. #64
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    8,105
    Quote Originally Posted by nealric View Post
    I wouldn't take Men's health as a very serious strength training guide.
    Yes, feel free to attack that source. But the idea was not to use mens health as a scientific authority or training guide, it was just one of the first hits on google. I posted it because it clearly summarizes the fact that different values for X and Y when doing X sets of Y produce different results.

    Feel free to search for yourself. There are millions of articles that compare high reps/low weight with low reps/high weight.

    More to the point, there are countless studies for weight training and cycling performance.

    Here's a scientific study on cyclists which found no significant differences between high resistance, high reps, and control: High resistance/low repetition vs. low resistance/high repetition t... - PubMed - NCBI

    Here's a scientific article that found heavy strength training leads to improved cycling performance in elite cyclists as evidenced by a superior effect size of ES training vs E training on relative improvements in power output at 4 mmol L-1 [la- ], peak power output during 30-s Wingate test, Wmax , and mean power output during 40-min all-out trial. Strength training improves performance and pedaling characteristics... - PubMed - NCBI

    If the training for mass and strength were so different, you wouldn't see the crossover between power lifters and bodybuilders.
    Sorry, that's too conclusory.

    Exactly what crossover, aside from them both lifting weights?

    Can you tell us the X sets of Y used by both body builders and power lifters?

  15. #65
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nealric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    6,125
    Quote Originally Posted by Local Hero View Post
    Here's a scientific study on cyclists which found no significant differences between high resistance, high reps, and control: High resistance/low repetition vs. low resistance/high repetition t... - PubMed - NCBI
    That study actually finds that the high resistance subjects had better strength gains, but that those gains didn't translate to cycling performance.

    There is a ton of research out there, but the conclusions are often rather equivocal if you dig deeply.

    Exactly what crossover, aside from them both lifting weights?

    Can you tell us the X sets of Y used by both body builders and power lifters?
    I'm talking about athletes who successfully compete in both bodybuilding and powerlifting in a relatively short period of time. For example, Arnold Schwartzenegger won the German power lifting championships and the Mr. Universe competitions in the same year.

  16. #66
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    8,105
    Quote Originally Posted by nealric View Post
    There is a ton of research out there, but the conclusions are often rather equivocal if you dig deeply.

    I'm talking about athletes who successfully compete in both bodybuilding and powerlifting in a relatively short period of time. For example, Arnold Schwartzenegger won the German power lifting championships and the Mr. Universe competitions in the same year.
    So...no scientific conclusions and just anecdotes?

    I have already said that there are plenty of bodybuilders who are strong and plenty of powerlifters who look like bodybuilders. That doesn't really change whether varying the X and Y in X sets of Y makes a difference if someone is lifting for size or strength.



    Quote Originally Posted by nealric View Post
    That study actually finds that the high resistance subjects had better strength gains, but that those gains didn't translate to cycling performance.
    So...the high resistence, low reps are better for strength. That disputes your point (yet you mention it?). And I said there is no significant difference (in cycling, which is what this thread is all about anyway). As I said?

    I'm not sure what you're on about. It feels like you are arguing just to argue. So I will go ahead and bow of out this on.
    Last edited by Local Hero; 12-11-2014 at 12:45 PM.

  17. #67
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nealric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    6,125
    Quote Originally Posted by Local Hero View Post
    So...no scientific conclusions and just anecdotes?

    I have already said that there are plenty of bodybuilders who are strong and plenty of powerlifters who look like bodybuilders. That doesn't really change whether X sets of Y makes a difference if someone is lifting for size or strength.



    So...the high resistence, low reps are better for strength. That disputes your point (yet you mention it?). And I said there is no significant difference (in cycling, which is what this thread is all about anyway). As I said?

    I'm not sure what you're on about. It feels like you are arguing just to argue. So I will go ahead and bow of out this on.
    Don't get me wrong, I am not anti-science on this front. My issue is that the quality of most fitness research is simply terrible. This is for two reasons 1) they don't have the funding for long term or sufficiently large sample groups, 2) the researchers often have limited fitness expertise and therefore often don't examine real training alternatives, instead focusing on extremely contrived exercise regimens that only make sense in a lab environment.

    The study you cited on cyclists and strength went for a mere 10 weeks. But strength builds the body up over a period of YEARS. A more interesting study would have taken a group of cyclists that did no strength training (perhaps with an average max squat of 135lbs) and followed them as they trained to double or more than initial amount, THEN examined their cycling performance.

    Regarding anecdotes vs studies. It's true that the plural of anecdote is not data. But if the science says there are no 3-armed monkeys, and you have one right in front of you, you have to take a hard look at the science.

    My take on this thread was initially limited to concerns about "bulking up" expressed by the OP, rather than the usefulness of strength training for cyclists. This got into disputing implications that strength and size were unrelated. I'm not arguing for the sake of arguing- just trying to share my understanding and critiques of various training ideas.

  18. #68
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    8,105
    lunges with 95? lbs:
    https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v...type=2&theater

    squats with 155lbs:
    https://www.facebook.com/opqscycling...type=1&theater

    according to Omega Pharma, these riders had jsut finished 3.5 hours of riding.

    And, "professional road cyclists are endurance athletes, not strength athletes. Resistance training is part of training, but not their top priority"

  19. #69
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,476
    There isn't a best way... Lift to failure repeatedly... To the OP, the answer is no, you can't get stronger without gaining mass. It's a trade off between how much weight you are willing to gain for improvements in your cycling. As we all know and have seen or posted here, you are not going to get huge and kill your climbing, but you will gain muscle mass AND fat. The amount of unwanted weight can be mitigated by your nutrition but without "help" it's still going to be some combination of muscle and fat.

    So there are two questions, the first being will this help your cycling at all? I'm not convinced that it will. I am left thinking there is a degree of core and physioball work that can be a real benefit but I wouldn't really consider that traditional lifting. And none of it would make a cosmetic difference. Again, not traditional lifting, but Plyos are an odd man out? Increased injury risk but maybe worth it? Brutal stuff though, wear your HR monitor for that and see if you can blow it up! LOL!

    And, what kind of lifting is best if I want to gain strength without unnecessary extra weight? Probably none? But, I think you are as well advised to lift for total load as you are for low rep max. Lifting heavy increases injury risk but accomplishes hypertrophy in less total time. Ultimately, failure is failure. Stress and adaptation is what will make you stronger. So where is the balance between high rep and low rep? Well, crazy high rep stuff is ridiculous in the time it takes to do a set. Low rep is increasing injury risk... This is IMO only... So the old standard of 8-12 reps seems to hold. Lift what you can 8 times until you can do it comfortably and then go to 10 then 12 then add weight and go back to 8. Do that for 2 or 3 sets depending on how much time you have. Or pick lifts that are more important to you and do three sets of those, knocking off on two sets of the others.

    Me? I'm going out to get in some base miles.
    Last edited by PBL450; 12-14-2014 at 06:32 AM.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  20. #70
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    126
    This forum has given me so much information and I am so appreciative of all the advice that has come along.

    Just a quick comment on the "Mass" part that I was initially concerned about. My body type is more that of a sprinter than a Spanish climber (Unfortunate for me as a cyclist by much more to my wife's liking!). I have been on a weight loss journey over the past couple of years and still carry 24% body fat. I weight lifted hard in High School and in the years after HS. As such, size can come back quickly for me and faster than the 150lb climber...

    You have all given me a ton to review and consider and I believe I'm on a training plan now that should have me progressing well towards my goals in the spring.

    Please keep the forum going. I love reading some of the battles in different opinions here!
    2015 Guru Photon R Disc Custom - Super Record (15 lbs)
    2016 Olympia Boost Dura Ace Di2 (14.5 lbs)
    2019 Cannondale Synapse, Ultegra Di2 - Mavic Cosmic Carbons
    2016 Storck Aero Road Build - SRAM Red
    2006 Colnago Strada Scandium Record Group FSA cockpit/brakes and Mad Fibers (14 lbs)

    Road Team Sponsor and M3 Racer (Team Techykids.ca)


    Fav accessories:
    Mad Fibers, FSA Bars, Power2Max Power Meter Crankset(s), Mavic R-SYS SLR and Carbon Tubulars
    -Self admitted Weight Weenie!!!

  21. #71
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by Rackerman View Post
    Are there any general rules of thumb to follow when winter weight training to build strength but not to pack on mass? I'm using full body weight training to continue with a weight loss plan and with a current knee injury, I'm not able to cycle or do as much leg work as I'd like to do... But I'm concerned about packing on unwanted mass that will do little to benefit cycling speeds... unless descending of course.

    Any input re: reps, sets, how fast to go through reps, rest periods, reps to failure, supersetting? I'm fairly experienced in the gym and workout 3 or 4 times a week based on work schedule.

    My wife disagrees. But that's another story.
    Is the knee injury an overuse injury? If that's the case, then you can still safely strengthen your leg. In order to prevent reinjury, it would be wise to address any muscle imbalances with corrective exercise. Use this time to get some quality rehabilitation and injury prevention. It will feel less like a setback to make this a priority.

    Also, if you don't want to gain weight, aim to get only one or two sets (6-8 reps) done and avoid protein intake immediately before a weight lifting session. That's only a very general rule of thumb. I know several other methodologies to increasing strength without increasing weight. There are other training and nutritional protocols you can use. By the way, I'm an ACE Certified Sports Conditioning Specialist, Personal Trainer and hold a degree in Kinesiology. I specialize in the strength and conditioning for cycling and use it for my own competitive purpose too.

    Also, I can help you determine what body weight will optimize your chances at a race win. The terrain, course design, physiological limitations, psychological limitations and racing style need to be considered. There are pros and cons associated with any body weight and I can teach you how to take advantage of other rider's weaknesses. Contact me at [email protected] to set up a free consultation with me.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Similar Threads

  1. Strength and toughness of aluminum at 1/2 the weight.
    By looigi in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-19-2011, 11:56 PM
  2. Build strength without gaining weight?
    By mjdwyer23 in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-07-2009, 01:45 PM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-05-2008, 07:02 PM
  4. Winter weight training, pt. 2 (Crits)
    By soup67 in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 10-27-2006, 06:08 AM
  5. Strength training with low weight 30 reps
    By Reynolds531 in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-14-2004, 12:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.