Tire width vs. rim width
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  1. #1
    zpl
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    Tire width vs. rim width

    I'm asking this in the Commuting forum since I know many of you ride with wider tires. I just took my brand new Salsa Casseroll Triple on its maiden voyage this morning. The bike came with 700x32 tires that have some tread. Coming from a Specialized Allez, the road feel was pretty tank-like.

    The width of my rims also seems enormous compared to my Allez. A sticker on them says they are 22.5mm wide. Now I don't care to run 23mm tires anymore, but I'm wondering if I should be able to run 25mm ones without issues?

  2. #2
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    Larger rims are really for larger tires. Not sure how small you can go, but some stuff here:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

  3. #3
    N. Hollywood, CA
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    I think Sheldon has a rule of 1.5 to 1 on the wide side of the tire. Unsure about rules of thumb for skinny tires on wide rims. I'd hesitate to go below 1:1, meaning don't try a 19mm racing tire on 22.5 rims. You will not have any problem running 25mm tires, although perhaps they won't be as round in profile as if they were on a narrower rim.

    Your reaction to the wide tires and rims seems based on emotion, but what about need? If you're skinny and tend to ride like a "roadie", perhaps 32mm is a tad wide and maybe a superlight 28mm (like the Grand Bois tires) would give you some of that "performance" feel. But then why get a Casseroll, triple, if you don't need modest-to-wide tires? Certainly you didn't get the bike to keep up with the local crit...
    VC - It's the vehicular code.

  4. #4
    zpl
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    Quote Originally Posted by ispoke
    Your reaction to the wide tires and rims seems based on emotion, but what about need? If you're skinny and tend to ride like a "roadie", perhaps 32mm is a tad wide and maybe a superlight 28mm (like the Grand Bois tires) would give you some of that "performance" feel. But then why get a Casseroll, triple, if you don't need modest-to-wide tires? Certainly you didn't get the bike to keep up with the local crit...
    I picked up some 25mm Conti GP4000s and mounted them for a ride Sunday morning. They fit fine and round out nicely.

    I do admit I'm still coming to terms with the differences between the Casseroll and my Allez. I bought the Salsa because I wanted a more comfortable road bike that I could mount full fenders on and use for everything - commuting, long rides, and even some faster group rides. I'm a 230 lb Clydesdale and so the option to put on wider tires is very welcome. I'm sure I'll throw the 32s back on come winter time.

  5. #5
    N. Hollywood, CA
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    Sounds like the long term solution is 2 pairs of wheels, or don't give up the Allez! 2 bikes are way better than one bike with 2 pairs of hoops.

    I love commuting on fat, soft 32s while racked up with loaded panniers. But admittedly most wide tires are heavy dogs that would put a damper on spirited weekend rides. That's where bike #2 comes in...
    VC - It's the vehicular code.

  6. #6
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    It sounds to me like you may want 32's, just a different brand. Try a few other tires, and you are bound to find one that you like.

  7. #7
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by zpl
    The bike came with 700x32 tires that have some tread. Coming from a Specialized Allez, the road feel was pretty tank-like.
    Keep in mind that wider tires need to be run at much lower pressures than narrower ones if you want a more comfortable ride. At identical pressures, a wider tire will feel much harsher than a narrower one.

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