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  1. #1
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    Campagnolo fd shifting

    I just had the 12s Record installed, campag virgin here. Still getting used to its different shifting,but my main doubt remains for the chainring “shift down” button. The button does not like a simple “click” to shift,it wants to be pushed all the way down pretty much like the rd button when you need to downshift multiple cogs at once. Again,one click is not enough,with one click you sorta have the fd trim a bit,it's the second hit that does the actual shift. Is it normal ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    I just had the 12s Record installed, campag virgin here. Still getting used to its different shifting,but my main doubt remains for the chainring “shift down” button. The button does not like a simple “click” to shift,it wants to be pushed all the way down pretty much like the rd button when you need to downshift multiple cogs at once. Again,one click is not enough,with one click you sorta have the fd trim a bit,it's the second hit that does the actual shift. Is it normal ?
    Normal.

    If you want to drop from big ring to small, you give it the full 3 or 4 clicks (depending on how it was set up) on the thumb shifter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fronesis View Post
    Normal.

    If you want to drop from big ring to small, you give it the full 3 or 4 clicks (depending on how it was set up) on the thumb shifter.
    Honestly speaking this sucks and I see it as a step backwards compared to my former Shimano. Is there any way the button can be set to just one click?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Honestly speaking this sucks and I see it as a step backwards compared to my former Shimano. Is there any way the button can be set to just one click?
    As someone who went from Campy (11s Record) to Shimano – I hear what you are saying. I really like the front shifting of Shimano.

    For the record: on current Shimano 11s mechanical, if you are in the top position, it's actually two clicks to drop the chain to the small ring (one click just gives you the high trim position).

    But to answer your question: no, I'm pretty much certain that it's impossible to set it up any other way. At least on Campy 11s (I've never set up or ridden 12s), the way it was designed was for the drop from big to small to move you all the way to the lowest setting (and for trim to be added only on the small ring). This means multiple thumb-clicks to drop the chain from the big ring to the small.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fronesis View Post
    As someone who went from Campy (11s Record) to Shimano – I hear what you are saying. I really like the front shifting of Shimano.

    For the record: on current Shimano 11s mechanical, if you are in the top position, it's actually two clicks to drop the chain to the small ring (one click just gives you the high trim position).

    But to answer your question: no, I'm pretty much certain that it's impossible to set it up any other way. At least on Campy 11s (I've never set up or ridden 12s), the way it was designed was for the drop from big to small to move you all the way to the lowest setting (and for trim to be added only on the small ring). This means multiple thumb-clicks to drop the chain from the big ring to the small.
    Thank you again 👍.

    I have to be honest: I know there’s a break in /adapting phase i’ll have to go through but I wish I could have tested a Campagnolo group before venturing into buying one because of its fashion/fame. Probably I would have picked a 9100 da,the heck with the Colnago frame. Well....let’s see...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Honestly speaking this sucks and I see it as a step backwards compared to my former Shimano. Is there any way the button can be set to just one click?
    Think about it...how could that work? The purpose of multiple clicks is so you can 'trim' the front derailleur. There isn't any way of making it function that way.

    I'm surprised you'd spend Record 12 $'s w/o trying it first. That said, I wouldn't worry too much, you'll get used to it.
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    One of the things that keeps me a Campy guy is the front derailleur's multiple click shifting. Sure, I haven't tried any of the latest derailleurs, but it always bothered me how the Shimano front shift lever couldn't do anything but manhandle the front derailleur down to the small chainring. Bang!

    The multiple-clicking Campy, in contrast, allows me to gently yet still efficiently place the chain onto the smaller cog. The multiple clicking also allows me to fine-tune the front derailleur guide as I ride for maximum silence and smoothness.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Think about it...how could that work? The purpose of multiple clicks is so you can 'trim' the front derailleur. There isn't any way of making it function that way.

    I'm surprised you'd spend Record 12 $'s w/o trying it first. That said, I wouldn't worry too much, you'll get used to it.
    I’m sure i’ll get used to it but again why should I need to have multiple shift/trim function on something that only has to move once in either direction ? Totally missing the point. Maybe i’ve been driving Toyotas for way too much time now..
    Unfortunately bad flu and bad weather are keeping me at home,no maiden ride yet..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    One of the things that keeps me a Campy guy is the front derailleur's multiple click shifting. Sure, I haven't tried any of the latest derailleurs, but it always bothered me how the Shimano front shift lever couldn't do anything but manhandle the front derailleur down to the small chainring. Bang!

    The multiple-clicking Campy, in contrast, allows me to gently yet still efficiently place the chain onto the smaller cog. The multiple clicking also allows me to fine-tune the front derailleur guide as I ride for maximum silence and smoothness.
    Current Shimano 11s FDs all have both high trim (on big ring) and low trim (on small ring). There are four positions total, and if the FD is set up correctly you can run in all 22 gears with no rub at all.

    Well, to be clear, whether you can run small-small depends upon the frame geometry and what kind of crankset you are running (because the chain might hit the big ring). But big-big is no problem.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    I’m sure i’ll get used to it but again why should I need to have multiple shift/trim function on something that only has to move once in either direction ? Totally missing the point. Maybe i’ve been driving Toyotas for way too much time now..
    Unfortunately bad flu and bad weather are keeping me at home,no maiden ride yet..
    If you've been running Shimano they also have the 'useless' trim positions.
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    Hasn't the left Campy Ergo shifter always been a ratchet type, rather than a true indexed type???? (going back to 8 speed)
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    If you've been running Shimano they also have the 'useless' trim positions.
    Yeah but not when pushing to go down on 36...

    Let me explaing the issue better :

    Rear derailleur : no problem whastsoever,the button is stiff af compared to shimano but give it a "clack" and the chain moves down once ( ore more if I keep going)

    Frond derailleur : I'm on 52 and need to go on 36,the button goes "clack" but the chain does not move,period. I have to keep going all the way down to have it moving
    Last edited by Devastazione; 3 Weeks Ago at 12:51 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Frond derailleur : I'm on 52 and need to go on 36,the button goes "clack" but the chain does not move,period. I have to keep going all the way down to have it moving
    It does sound like you are stuck on the feedback from sound and feel, which makes sense. You are hardwired by now that "1 click means a shift". Hardwired actions are hard to re-wire.

    It won't be long before your mental "shift front" turns into full movement, and "trim" will be shorter movement.

    You'll get used to it, though maybe you won't care for it. Personally, I love being able to trim the FD, since the chain scraping it is one of my least favorite sounds to hear when riding.
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    First, just going by my > 2015 11sp, it's 2 clicks. More than anything I believe it's a precaution against dropping the chain. Those first 2 clicks will get you half way up the rear cluster then the chain will start rubbing. A final click moves the derailleur all the way over. At first it was different for me coming from 10sp, but I got used to it and think nothing of it now.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Yeah but not when pushing to go down on 36...

    Let me explaing the issue better :

    Rear derailleur : no problem whastsoever,the button is stiff af compared to shimano but give it a "clack" and the chain moves down once ( ore more if I keep going)

    Frond derailleur : I'm on 52 and need to go on 36,the button goes "clack" but the chain does not move,period. I have to keep going all the way down to have it moving
    I am quite familiar w/ the 'issue'. Different manufacturers design their components to work differently...that's part of the appeal and why some prefer Campy to Shimano. Your Campy is working exactly as it's supposed to...you should have tried it first before dropping big $$$ on something new.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY View Post
    Hasn't the left Campy Ergo shifter always been a ratchet type, rather than a true indexed type???? (going back to 8 speed)
    Yes. And it is really easy to get used to actually controlling the front shift rather than relying on the "big bang" approach used by Shimano and SRAM. Neither approach is right or wrong, though there have been a lot of posts here from people who can't seem to get that "big bang" shift to work "just right" every time. I've ridden both and I much prefer the Campy approach, but that's just me.

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    Electronic needed here?

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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    It does sound like you are stuck on the feedback from sound and feel, which makes sense. You are hardwired by now that "1 click means a shift". Hardwired actions are hard to re-wire.

    It won't be long before your mental "shift front" turns into full movement, and "trim" will be shorter movement.
    +1 on this.

    I've been riding Shimano for a while now, but I still kind of miss the satisfaction of dropping the chain to the small ring by giving the left thumb shifter a full mash.

    You'll get used to it, though maybe you won't care for it. Personally, I love being able to trim the FD, since the chain scraping it is one of my least favorite sounds to hear when riding.
    Not sure I follow you here: both Campy and Shimano allow FD trim – so this isn't a feature of Campy. Campy does it with only one trim position (on the small ring) while Shimano has two trim positions (one on small and one on big).

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    Quote Originally Posted by goodboyr View Post
    Electronic needed here?

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    Most likely I will at some point,but I really want to keep my c64 old school.

    Again,i’ll probably get used to it,but this explain a lot why Alfa Romeos and Maseratis at some point start to fall a part while Lexus keeps on ticking. Just for information my shimano FDs never ever needed a single trim when set up properly.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Most likely I will at some point,but I really want to keep my c64 old school.

    Again,i’ll probably get used to it,but this explain a lot why Alfa Romeos and Maseratis at some point start to fall a part while Lexus keeps on ticking. Just for information my shimano FDs never ever needed a single trim when set up properly.
    Not possible, that's why they included the trim feature.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fronesis View Post
    +1 on this.

    I've been riding Shimano for a while now, but I still kind of miss the satisfaction of dropping the chain to the small ring by giving the left thumb shifter a full mash.



    Not sure I follow you here: both Campy and Shimano allow FD trim – so this isn't a feature of Campy. Campy does it with only one trim position (on the small ring) while Shimano has two trim positions (one on small and one on big).
    When I had bikes with both Campy and Shimano groups it would take me a couple of miles to re-adjust to the shifting but after that it was pretty much automatic. That become a little harder when I had a SRAM equipped bike. Slamming the thumb shifter down on Campy became muscle memory pretty quickly. I have not tried electronic shifting, but with mechanical, I prefer the operation of Campy shifters over Shimano

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    Quote Originally Posted by fronesis View Post
    Not sure I follow you here: both Campy and Shimano allow FD trim – so this isn't a feature of Campy.
    I was brand agnostic in my post.

    From reading the thread, I was assuming the OP was going from an older non-trim Shimano set up. I could be wrong on that. That's why I was focusing on liking to be able to trim, and habit. Trim is a feature the OP seemed not to have experienced before.

    If the extra clicks are the problem, then that would apply to Shimano trim (I assume, though I have not touched Shimano on the road for years due to hood shape). Thus my focus on "trim" as a good thing that will quickly become automatic, not brand specific issues.
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    I was brand agnostic in my post.

    From reading the thread, I was assuming the OP was going from an older non-trim Shimano set up. I could be wrong on that. That's why I was focusing on liking to be able to trim, and habit. Trim is a feature the OP seemed not to have experienced before.

    If the extra clicks are the problem, then that would apply to Shimano trim (I assume, though I have not touched Shimano on the road for years due to hood shape). Thus my focus on "trim" as a good thing that will quickly become automatic, not brand specific issues.
    It was the Ultegra r8000. The trim was there,but it wasn’t taking the scene as much as it does on Campy when downshifting..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    It was the Ultegra r8000. The trim was there,but it wasn’t taking the scene as much as it does on Campy when downshifting..
    Got it. Seems both noise and feel, right?

    I have to say, testing it would have made this very clear. The feel is very different between the two systems. I mean, I have not ridden Shimano but I have shifted a few times.

    All I can say is try it for a while. I have pretty much hated EVERY new shifter brand I have used, both road and mtb. For a week or two. After that, I just don't pay attention enough to notice. That might be the case for you as well.

    The only other option is to sell it. Or park it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    I was brand agnostic in my post.

    From reading the thread, I was assuming the OP was going from an older non-trim Shimano set up. I could be wrong on that. That's why I was focusing on liking to be able to trim, and habit. Trim is a feature the OP seemed not to have experienced before.

    If the extra clicks are the problem, then that would apply to Shimano trim (I assume, though I have not touched Shimano on the road for years due to hood shape). Thus my focus on "trim" as a good thing that will quickly become automatic, not brand specific issues.
    Makes sense.

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