Carbon fiber handle bars yay or nay? - Page 3
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  1. #51
    Daft Punk built my hotrod
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    I assume everyone concerned about carbon bars is deathly afraid of carbon steers. Because if the steerer fails, you're FUBAR, baby.

    I used to be more worried about carbon bars, but then I really like how they smooth out the vibrations. That and I've been using carbon bars on my mountain bikes for over a decade.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikerp View Post
    Please define this "normal crash", I'm sure the bike industry would be happy to know what it is, as they could start designing for it.
    No thanks

  3. #53
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    Carbon fiber handle bars yay or nay?

    I used to have chronic elbow pain when I rode alloy bars. Changing to carbon bars solved the problem.

    Not all carbon bars absorb road buzz. I had a Felt 1.1 bar that was crazy stiff.
    Arguments among misinformed people do not constitute a "debate."
    --Kerry Irons

    "Atheism is a religion like not collecting stamps is a hobby."
    --BianchiJoe

    Cervelo S3/Dura Ace
    Felt B2Pro/SRAM
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  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by sir duke View Post
    I only surmised the carbon might have lessened my injury. The reality is they broke and they're expensive. You do the math...
    Watch for them on chainlove, buy one at a really great price, put on the shelf. Chances are you will never need it at this point, if you don't have one sitting there waiting to be used, you are almost guaranteed to need one at some point.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    nay, ok here are my 5 characters, moe, larry, curry, gaga, & slash
    Curley?
    Too old to ride plastic

  6. #56
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    I'm a fan of aluminum bars and steel bikes.

    That being said, any material can fail. A friend of a Good friend was going down a slight incline in traffic and his aluminum bar snapped of at the stem. My friend was behind him when it happened and to this day doesn't know how he was able to maintain control of the bike.
    I'd say Solid handling skills.

    I've got a pair of bent aluminum bars, from a crash, on a dedicated trainer bike, and I had a pair of carbon bars go soft for no apparent reason. No crash on the carbon bars and the didn't snap but were unusable. They were replaced, under warranty, and are now hanging on the wall. But so is the carbon bike that they were on.
    Too old to ride plastic

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Curley?
    No, Curry from Bollywood.
    Quote Originally Posted by chudak View Post
    It's made with a mixture of titanium, unobtanium and the freshly harvested dew from the sweaty brows of 16 YO suburban virgins.
    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    Don't forget the ground up unicorn horn. That makes it magical.

  8. #58
    Dan
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    I had a set of carbon bars and after one week they just exploded even although I was stationary at the time. We should be warned how dangerous these are.

  9. #59
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    ,,,,,
    Last edited by BikeLayne; 03-29-2015 at 08:14 AM.

  10. #60
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    Waaaaay back when I had this same discussion regarding the bars on my mountain bike. The gist of the discussion boiled down to:

    1) If you're after weight savings, there is a very small benefit to be had going carbon. The value for the weight savings...that's far more debatable.

    2) If you're trying to eliminate "buzz", carbon gives better damping and will help.

    3) In a crash, carbon will either be perfectly fine, or toast...there is no middle ground. Alloy may be damaged / bent, but it is more likely that you'll be able to finish your ride...carbon bars are strong, but alloy / alu bars are generally "tougher" and there is a difference between those two terms.

    Hope it helps.
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by MercRidnMike View Post
    Waaaaay back when I had this same discussion regarding the bars on my mountain bike. The gist of the discussion boiled down to:

    1) If you're after weight savings, there is a very small benefit to be had going carbon. The value for the weight savings...that's far more debatable.

    2) If you're trying to eliminate "buzz", carbon gives better damping and will help.

    3) In a crash, carbon will either be perfectly fine, or toast...there is no middle ground. Alloy may be damaged / bent, but it is more likely that you'll be able to finish your ride...carbon bars are strong, but alloy / alu bars are generally "tougher" and there is a difference between those two terms.

    Hope it helps.
    4) Carbon bars, ounce for ounce are far stronger than aluminum bars so given a certain crash, you're more likely to have a fully intact bar.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by MercRidnMike View Post
    1) If you're after weight savings, there is a very small benefit to be had going carbon. The value for the weight savings...that's far more debatable.
    Weight savings is around 70g it seems. Seeing how Ultegra is about ~220g heavier than dura ace that's quite a bit of savings for a single component.

  13. #63
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    Nay for me. The weight saving isn't worth it for me the extra $150. If my AL Pro 7S Vibe is good enough for the pros like Wiggins, good enough for me.

    And contrary to believe, it's the opposite when I read about Pros who choose AL for the extra strength and stiffness over carbon. Example: Sagan.

    And there are reviews that say the Pro 7S AL are stiffer and stronger than their carbon counterparts.
    Last edited by ruckus; 05-09-2014 at 10:03 AM.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
    4) Carbon bars, ounce for ounce are far stronger than aluminum bars so given a certain crash, you're more likely to have a fully intact bar.
    Or you could have a bar that seems fine but will fail at the next big impact.

  15. #65
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    The only thing that has ever tempted me to get carbon bars is the extra vibration damping they give you. To get one of any quality, the cost rules out its practicality.

    Not worth it IMO. You can get the same vibration damping by going to a slightly wider tire size.

    As far as any part of a bike getting trashed in a crash, if this happens, I will just be happy if I can still walk away with nothing more than road rash.
    Last edited by Lombard; 05-13-2014 at 06:04 AM.

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhluhr View Post
    4) Carbon bars, ounce for ounce are far stronger than aluminum bars so given a certain crash, you're more likely to have a fully intact bar.
    Stronger per unit weight, yes....tougher, no. There is a distinct difference between the two properties.

    As 32and3cross and I have both noted, carbon bars are either fine or toast (which includes unseen damage which can result in subsequent failure). Whether or not they are more likely to be intact following a specified impact will depend on the impact....the alu will be more likely to bend or dent (due to its toughness) and may be repairable, or at least able to be ridden home, where as the carbon matrix does not have the same ability to deform when you reach it's peak strength...it snaps.
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

  17. #67
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    Depends on the bars. (420mm used as reference on all)

    Zipp SL V2 carbon bars $250 (Ribble), 170 g;
    Deda Newton 31 Anatomical alu bars $60 (Ribble), 205 g.
    Both are on the light end of their respective spectrums, but only 35 g difference there for ~$200 more from your wallet.

    But if you bring in the Deda Presa Carbon bars: $170 (Ribble), 214 g. (Still fairly high end)
    The alu are lighter and ~$100 less in this case.

    If all you are after is shaving the equivalent of a decent squirt from a water bottle, there are lots of (expensive) ways to do it.
    So 10 times wasn't enough and I'm going back again:my participant page for the 2019 Alberta Ride to Conquer Cancer.

    18 Bowman Palace:R, 09 Knolly Delirium T, ?? Mercury Road Bike, signed '06 Gary Fisher Cake 2DLX, 12 Cervelo S2 (frame to be repaired)

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by MercRidnMike View Post
    the alu will be more likely to bend or dent (due to its toughness) and may be repairable, or at least able to be ridden home, where as the carbon matrix does not have the same ability to deform when you reach it's peak strength...it snaps.
    If you deform an alu bar on impact, throw it away once you get home.
    As long as I'm not in the middle of a sand wasteland I'm pretty sure I could limp home with a snapped carbon bar (comes down to making a splint/doubler/etc). It's already been done.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by MercRidnMike View Post
    the alu will be more likely to bend or dent (due to its toughness) and may be repairable
    Repair a bent aluminum bar? Not likely. Especially since a lot are heat treated after forming and not malleable after the treatment.

  20. #70
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    This entire thread is missing most relevant factors. What aluminum at what hardness and what carbon fiber with what matrix?

    I wouldn't recommend any carbon bars or seat posts that were made before 2000 (unless they were hybrid with kevlar). "Aluminum" is such a broad term that it is meaningless--even in specific uses like handlebars and seat posts.

    Carbon fiber, the matrix used and the curing process have improved so much in recent years that you'd need to know the date and place of manufacture, the specifics of the carbon and the curing/ processing methods to form a rational opinion.

    Generally, late model carbon tubing can withstand far more identical flex cycles than late model aluminum tubing of similar weight.

    Quote Originally Posted by 32and3cross View Post
    All on the same ride (gotta get home somehow) and no one pulled the stem plate (no way that will ever happen in a race) but there was no crack to see after the crash.

    I have seen 3 different carbon bars break at the stem shearing off all the way around. All were either from impact or (like above) an incident post impact.

    Im sure there are lots of bars that don't brake and work fine after impact but the "benefits" of the carbon bars are not worth the risk or the price to me.

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