• 04-07-2019
    aclinjury
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Your skewers have absolutely nothing to do w/ your rims rubbing your BRAKE pads. Nothing. Nada. Zero. It doesn't matter what you clamp your wheels into your frame with, the rim and spokes play the big role in wheel flex, hub geometry a less but still important role.
    You'll never feel the weight you saved while riding. It's in the very center of the wheel and isn't rotating. Pretty much a waste of money.

    I was thinking the same. If his Ti skewers are moving so bad to the point of allowing the wheels to deflect like that, he'd see more issues like rattling at the fork dropouts and worse like the skewer nut chewing out his fork dropouts, definitely will notice many things aside from just brake pad rubbing
  • 04-08-2019
    Kerry Irons
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by djlk View Post
    They donít have enough clamping strength to keep my wheels (Enve 5.6 SES) from flexing into my break pads when I climb. With campy or Shimano steel skewers I donít have this problem.

    The implied physical mechanism for your claim is that the hub axle is actually moving up and down in the dropout. Highly unlikely. If this were the case you would see significant wear marks on the dropout faces. I'll bet you don't.
  • 04-08-2019
    Lombard
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mackgoo View Post
    You're correct. People ride bikes every day and survive. Sadly occasionally some get hit by cars.

    This is a stupid analogy and not worth responding to.
  • 04-10-2019
    mackgoo
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mackgoo View Post
    You're correct. People ride bikes every day and survive. Sadly occasionally some get hit by cars.

    Just pointing out perspective. Many would say riding a bike on the road foolish. We all like to apply our own standards to these "foolish" exercises in rightousness.