cassette body bearings
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    I am not aero
    Reputation: baking3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    304

    cassette body bearings

    I've traced an annoying tapping noise to the hub-side bearings in the cassette body of an Ultegra 6600 freewheel hub. It looks like there might be a bearing missing, causing them to continually click together as the wheel goes around. I've got 25 bearings, but it looks like 26 would fit. Does anyone know the correct bearing count for this race before I run out and buy a new cassette body only to find that 25 is correct? Thanks!

    Here's a cat.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    10,160

    info...

    The hub bearings are nine 1/4 inch per side.

    http://www.shimanocycling.com/media/...9830608914.pdf

    I don't know the count of bearings inside the cassette body, but having one less ball would never cause a clicking sound, IMO. If the balls are loose in the race, the maximum amount would leave slightly less than 1 ball diameter of free space. If one too many is put in, the last one should try to push others out of place.

    From Sheldon Brown:

    Generally, Freehub bodies are not repaired when they fail, because the labor cost of servicing them is often greater than the cost of buying a brand-new body.
    If you really want to take one apart and overhaul it, they may be serviced in the same way as conventional freewheels. You'll need a fairly hard-to-find old-style Shimano special tool (TL-FH 40) to unscrew the cup, which is also the cone for the main bearings.


    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html
    Last edited by C-40; 10-13-2008 at 12:35 PM.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: android's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,304
    Exploded view doesn't seem to be helpful.

    It won't hurt to add more. The normal procedure is to put as many as you can in, and then take one out. It that works and you get 26, go for it.

    BTW: if you decide to replace it, I've found it is usually almost cheaper to buy a complete rear hub and disassemble it for spare parts rather than buy the freehub body by itself. You get an extra axle, cones and QR skewer which are good spare parts to have.

    The innards of any 6600 Ultegra hub should be the same.

  4. #4
    Old and Fixed, Moderator
    Reputation: Dave Hickey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    20,473
    I've never taken apart the freehub but I've taken apart many cup and cone Shimano hubs and they all have one less bearing than it looks like will fit...They are designed that way.. I suspect that the source of your troubles is not a missing bearing
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: JCavilia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    14,706
    1. a properly adjusted and greased ball-bearing assembly won't audibly click because it's one ball short. I suspect your noise has another source.

    2. The way to determine the number of balls is as the other respondents explained.

    3. If it's a ball short, why would you buy a new freehub body? Ball bearings are cheap and readily available.

    4. I thought Shrodinger's cat was either alive or dead (or, more accurately, both (until you look)), not either in or out of the box.

  6. #6
    I am not aero
    Reputation: baking3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    304
    Quote Originally Posted by C-40
    I don't know the count of bearings inside the cassette body, but having one less ball would never cause a clicking sound, IMO. If the balls are loose in the race, the maximum amount would leave slightly less than 1 ball diameter of free space. If one too many is put in, the last one should try to push others out of place.

    From Sheldon Brown:

    Generally, Freehub bodies are not repaired when they fail, because the labor cost of servicing them is often greater than the cost of buying a brand-new body.
    If you really want to take one apart and overhaul it, they may be serviced in the same way as conventional freewheels. You'll need a fairly hard-to-find old-style Shimano special tool (TL-FH 40) to unscrew the cup, which is also the cone for the main bearings.
    ]
    It's hard to tell if it's a bit less than one ball's worth of space, or a bit more.

    The clicking only started after I overhauled the hub a while back; while I was at it, I flushed the cassette body with light oil. I don't think I lost any of the balls (in fact, they don't seem like they would come out on their own without actually disassembling the thing as Sheldon described).

  7. #7
    I am not aero
    Reputation: baking3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    304
    Quote Originally Posted by android
    BTW: if you decide to replace it, I've found it is usually almost cheaper to buy a complete rear hub and disassemble it for spare parts rather than buy the freehub body by itself. You get an extra axle, cones and QR skewer which are good spare parts to have.
    Good tip! Thanks!

  8. #8
    I am not aero
    Reputation: baking3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    304
    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia
    1. a properly adjusted and greased ball-bearing assembly won't audibly click because it's one ball short. I suspect your noise has another source.

    2. The way to determine the number of balls is as the other respondents explained.

    3. If it's a ball short, why would you buy a new freehub body? Ball bearings are cheap and readily available.

    4. I thought Shrodinger's cat was either alive or dead (or, more accurately, both (until you look)), not either in or out of the box.
    I suspect ya'll are right - that it's not the bearing count. The clicking is definitely from the cassette body though, you can hear it as you rotate it even if it is not "freewheeling" (pawls clicking).

    You're right about the cat of course. In the end, Schrodinger didn't like the analogy; he felt that it obscured too many of the nuances around the idea of a quantum measurement.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: crossracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    2,486
    If you didnt take the free hub apart how did you lube it? Did you use the freehub buddy to force lube into it? If you used the freehub buddy than i say retry again and relube it again. Next make sure you really tighten down the bolt holding the freehub to the hub body. After that make sure you have your required 18 bearings in the hub to rotate properly.


    I'll check back to see what you write. Bill

  10. #10
    I am not aero
    Reputation: baking3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    304
    Quote Originally Posted by crossracer
    If you didnt take the free hub apart how did you lube it? Did you use the freehub buddy to force lube into it? If you used the freehub buddy than i say retry again and relube it again. Next make sure you really tighten down the bolt holding the freehub to the hub body. After that make sure you have your required 18 bearings in the hub to rotate properly.


    I'll check back to see what you write. Bill
    There's a rubber seal that can be popped out on the back of the cassette body so you can shoot lube directly into the bearing space (but only the bearings in the back race are actually visible). The hub bearings are not the problem.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.