Chain wear = crank wear & cassette wear? true? false? bs?
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  1. #1
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    Chain wear = crank wear & cassette wear? true? false? bs?

    I was talking with a mechanic at the LBS yesterday. He told me that if I replaced my chain before it was worn out - when it was just getting close to being worn out - it would mean that I would save in the long run because I would almost never need to replace the crank or cassette.

    His point was that a worn chain wears out the crank and cassette.

    Any truth to that? Was he just feeding me a line to get me to buy a new chain? opinions?
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

  2. #2
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakerson
    I was talking with a mechanic at the LBS yesterday. He told me that if I replaced my chain before it was worn out - when it was just getting close to being worn out - it would mean that I would save in the long run because I would almost never need to replace the crank or cassette.

    His point was that a worn chain wears out the crank and cassette.

    Any truth to that? Was he just feeding me a line to get me to buy a new chain? opinions?
    yrp, he's right.

    Once your teeth are shark-finned, then you're ____ed
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  3. #3
    Every little counts...
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    Correcto.

    A good chain will wear rings and cogs very lightly as loads are evenly distributed over all teeth in contact.

    A worn (stretched or lengthened due to bushing wear) chain doesn't fit the teeth so only the first few teeth bear the load and the wear increases.

  4. #4
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    Some math

    Quote Originally Posted by jakerson
    I was talking with a mechanic at the LBS yesterday. He told me that if I replaced my chain before it was worn out - when it was just getting close to being worn out - it would mean that I would save in the long run because I would almost never need to replace the crank or cassette.

    His point was that a worn chain wears out the crank and cassette.

    Any truth to that? Was he just feeding me a line to get me to buy a new chain? opinions?
    He is correct about the wear issues, though whether you save money depends on several factors. Some people replace chains every 2500 miles and get several "chain changes" of cassette life, but they still eventually have to change the cassette. A worn chain wears cogs and chainrings faster, but cogs and chainrings still wear and will have to be replaced eventually. You have to do the numbers with your particular chain and cassette cost and mileage results. For me, it has been cheaper to maintain things well and replace the chain and cassette together (about 10K miles for Campy Record chains and Veloce cassettes). Campy chainrings, for me, last 60-70K miles, so they are really not part of the equation.

  5. #5
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    some truth...

    Chainrings and cassettes will wear out no matter how good the maintenance. It is true that using an excessively worn chain will increase cog and chainring wear. The trick is knowing how to measure chain wear.

    Here's a link to a recent discussion, where I covered the topic pretty thoroughly.

    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/sho...ght=chain+wear

  6. #6
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    Thanks everyone.

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