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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    I suspect that my bar tops are 2" lower than yours but my drops are only 1" lower than yours. I don't think you could handle either position. So there is your answer.
    I have one spacer and that's only because I don't want my stem directly on my head tube. I don't have a super aggressive frame, but that's another thing I like. While the TCR came out in the mid 90s when I was riding as a teenager as a revolution on the tour and everyone else followed along suit I didn't. It's not really my thing. If I were to get a newer frame it would probably be a CAAD because of tradition but then I don't really want to have to deal with BB30 like on their high end CAAD frames.

    I guess I just realised my ultimate bike geometry a long time ago and prefer traditional french fitted bikes as compared to the modern Eddy fit where everything is measured to a tee and you carry a spare wrench or two in your jersey pocket so you can adjust your bike while you're riding.

    To me its more comfortable... a bigger frame and just a handful of seat post with deeper drops. It might be my body also. I'm not vertically challenged (for a cyclist) but I'm one of those people with a long torso, and very little inseam that nobody makes a bike for.

    At 5"10 (178cm) tall I can't physically ride a bike that is bigger than a 54, where I should be able to by rights ride a 56. But I'd rather ride that as opposed to a 52 with a huge seat mast and your arse hanging out in the air like a sail. I like to stretch out more horizontally as well as vertically. It helps me breath better also as it doesn't compress my chest.
    Last edited by 1500SLR; 10-08-2018 at 12:59 AM.

  2. #27
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    I find cycling snobbery much more concerning than any equipment choices / set ups people may have. Not only does it discourage people from riding, but it makes the person appear to have low self esteem needing validation for their coolness in my mind.

    For longer rides, shallow drops give riders another hand position option that can be used comfortably for extended periods of time.
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  3. #28
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    This thread is really a microcosm of cyclists in general.. It's always the minority that have the holier than thou attitude that gives it a bad name. Roadies looking down on mtbers.. Caliper brakes against discs.. Now classic bars user passing judgement vs compact bars..

    You don't need to belittle other people's choices to justify your own.

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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    I have one spacer and that's only because I don't want my stem directly on my head tube. I don't have a super aggressive frame, but that's another thing I like. While the TCR came out in the mid 90s when I was riding as a teenager as a revolution on the tour and everyone else followed along suit I didn't. It's not really my thing. If I were to get a newer frame it would probably be a CAAD because of tradition but then I don't really want to have to deal with BB30 like on their high end CAAD frames.

    I guess I just realised my ultimate bike geometry a long time ago and prefer traditional french fitted bikes as compared to the modern Eddy fit where everything is measured to a tee and you carry a spare wrench or two in your jersey pocket so you can adjust your bike while you're riding.

    To me its more comfortable... a bigger frame and just a handful of seat post with deeper drops. It might be my body also. I'm not vertically challenged (for a cyclist) but I'm one of those people with a long torso, and very little inseam that nobody makes a bike for.

    At 5"10 (178cm) tall I can't physically ride a bike that is bigger than a 54, where I should be able to by rights ride a 56. But I'd rather ride that as opposed to a 52 with a huge seat mast and your arse hanging out in the air like a sail. I like to stretch out more horizontally as well as vertically. It helps me breath better also as it doesn't compress my chest.
    Ahhh, so now I sort of understand your position. You have short legs and a long torso. You probably have longer arms also.

    I'm 5'10" with a 32" inseam and take a 56 frame. I've heard of people my height taking a 54, but never a 52.
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  5. #30
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    Yeah I do have longer arms also, I have really weird body geometry so some things don't work for me, or I can't quite understand why they would because of what I have to deal with in making a bike fit me. That also mean when I have a setup that fits me I'm pretty unwilling just to change thing because someone says its all the rage. Thats another reason why I still ride the frame that I do... because it actually fits me.
    Last edited by 1500SLR; 10-08-2018 at 04:23 AM.

  6. #31
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    Drop handlebars.... I really don't see the point... No really...
    No really. I bet 75% of the people riding road bikes never ever ever use their drops. The majority of riders would be perfectly suited using bullhorns.
    Fact is, there is no one-size-fits-all handlebar. Compact bars fit the largest number of riders.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    At 5"10 (178cm) tall I can't physically ride a bike that is bigger than a 54
    Weird. I'm 5'9 and ride a 56cm.
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  7. #32
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    I have stumpy legs. I had my brother measure me because he was going to give me a frame that was a 56 when he was working for the Australian distributor of BMC. He just looked at me and said holy **** where are your legs? If I can pretend to be Frank (even though that's not my name) I don't know where my legs are either... they kind of never grew

  8. #33
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    Next in a series of posts following this one:

    "Different frame sizes...I really don't see the point"
    "Different frame geometries...I really don't see the point"
    "Different stem lengths...I really don't see the point"
    "Different handlebar widths...I really don't see the point"
    "Different saddles...I really don't see the point"

    OP: Different people than you ride bikes. Those different people have different preferences. They have different arm lengths, different flexibility levels, different hand sizes, and different cycling goals. They are not better or worse. Try to imagine someone different than you wanting to enjoy riding bikes, and there you have the need for different parts that affect a bike fit.

  9. #34
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    The problem is its been a while since I've revisited doing something with my cockpit but I've reached something that looks interesting enough at surface value but serves no real purpose to me as a rider and may also have some level of negative effect.

    Revisiting: I personally like my drops to provide a bit of a lower position so I can be more aggressive when I really need that, If you like shallow drops that's also that's fine.... However, when I'm riding in head winds living next to the ocean and want to plow through it, the drops become a really handy place to be. When I want to push through and take an advantage over the rider in front of me, I love my drops. when I'm taking a turn at the front of the group it's also a great place to be. But then I can also go back to my hoods when comfort, or my tops if i want something else where the mix between comfort and aerodynamics, has a higher priority.

    Have a nice day.
    Last edited by 1500SLR; 10-08-2018 at 11:02 AM.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    I have one spacer and that's only because I don't want my stem directly on my head tube. I don't have a super aggressive frame, but that's another thing I like. While the TCR came out in the mid 90s when I was riding as a teenager as a revolution on the tour and everyone else followed along suit I didn't. It's not really my thing. If I were to get a newer frame it would probably be a CAAD because of tradition but then I don't really want to have to deal with BB30 like on their high end CAAD frames.

    I guess I just realised my ultimate bike geometry a long time ago and prefer traditional french fitted bikes as compared to the modern Eddy fit where everything is measured to a tee and you carry a spare wrench or two in your jersey pocket so you can adjust your bike while you're riding.

    To me its more comfortable... a bigger frame and just a handful of seat post with deeper drops. It might be my body also. I'm not vertically challenged (for a cyclist) but I'm one of those people with a long torso, and very little inseam that nobody makes a bike for.

    At 5"10 (178cm) tall I can't physically ride a bike that is bigger than a 54, where I should be able to by rights ride a 56. But I'd rather ride that as opposed to a 52 with a huge seat mast and your arse hanging out in the air like a sail. I like to stretch out more horizontally as well as vertically. It helps me breath better also as it doesn't compress my chest.
    My point was that compact bars have nothing to do with bar height. They do have something to do with drop.

    A 5'4" rider with likely see the same amount of change in position with compacts as a 6' rider with standards.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    However, when I'm riding in head winds living next to the ocean and want to plow through it, the drops become a really handy place to be.
    When I experience this, I go into my aerobars, ohhhhh the tyranny!!!!!!
    I'll be sure and duck.

    ... I don't see the see the point of using your drops, when I have aerobars!
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  12. #37
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  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    When I experience this, I go into my aerobars, ohhhhh the tyranny!!!!!!
    I'll be sure and duck.

    ... I don't see the see the point of using your drops, when I have aerobars!
    I see your small list of ironing and top it off with:

    "if you ride aero bars in our group we wont let you past the front gate because lack of handling."

    Anyway I can ride with my arms on top of my tops like a pro, using the top of my hoods as aeros on my bike. To be fair this is also why we keep getting wider and wider aero tops.... For that arms and elbows on top of your tops look holding onto the brake cables like most tour pros since they banned Greg Lemond style clip on aeros. Don't need aero bars at all if you're pro. Thats why your hoods have pointy bits.

    Compact handlebars.... I really don't see the point... No really...-foil_launch_2016_action_image_scott_sports_23.jpg
    Last edited by 1500SLR; 10-08-2018 at 01:54 PM.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    "if you ride aero bars in our group we wont let you past the front gate because lack of handling."
    Your not going to like this, but I my bike handles way better when I'm in the aerobars, than when your riding with your fore arms on the tops of the bars. I actually take corners! Believe it or NOT!
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  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Your not going to like this, but I my bike handles way better when I'm in the aerobars, than when your riding with your fore arms on the tops of the bars. I actually take corners! Believe it or NOT!
    You can corner with your hands on the hoods. Its particularly good with my SRAM bike where the hoods sit a bit higher. SRAM makes really nice hoods.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    ...If I can pretend to be Frank (even though that's not my name)...
    Surely that's not a problem.......
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  17. #42
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    After looking at the picture, I see I interpeted it wrong. I though he had his forearms on the bar and not ahold of the hoods.

    The problem with his position (in the picture) as compared to using aerobars is that his elbows can hit his knees.

    An pro's use aerobars all the time, in the ITT. I would venture to state that over 90% of the win's in the ITT, they are using aerobars.
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  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    After looking at the picture, I see I interpeted it wrong. I though he had his forearms on the bar and not ahold of the hoods.

    The problem with his position (in the picture) as compared to using aerobars is that his elbows can hit his knees.

    An pro's use aerobars all the time, in the ITT. I would venture to state that over 90% of the win's in the ITT, they are using aerobars.
    Sure, time trials, and triathlon aren't governed by the same rules as road cycling, triathlon isn't even governed by the UCI but that's another story for how the ITU became a thing after the Olympics in 1988. Where aerobars are illegal in road cycling they're not in time trials and in triathlon. You can turn with your hands on the hoods and its a very good substitution for road races where you want a bit of a drop but not the whole drop.

    The problem when you go from time trialing and your mates training fro triathlon to training for road is that most serious road clubs wont let you ride with them in groups as riding with aero bars, or riding on the hoods in in this case as it reduces your bike control by about 90% due to the amount of contact patch you're actually using on the handlebars.

    To return to the discussion... Riding on the hoods is a good trick for when you need to be a bit more aero to push on with things in a race where you need to be a bit more aero but its not the best for really aggressive and tight corners.
    Last edited by 1500SLR; 10-08-2018 at 08:24 PM.

  19. #44
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    I have never been rejected in any group ride with my aero's. Some fee rides, they are not allowed & I have to take them off for that day.

    I don't ride in them 'in the pack', only off the front/back, and why would one (other than the obvious 'your an idiot' reason).

    With my CP bars, the position is very similar to the drops, maybe just a tad lower.
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  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Drop handlebars.... I really don't see the point... No really...
    No really. I bet 75% of the people riding road bikes never ever ever use their drops. The majority of riders would be perfectly suited using bullhorns.
    Fact is, there is no one-size-fits-all handlebar. Compact bars fit the largest number of riders.

    Weird. I'm 5'9 and ride a 56cm.
    I agree. I'm mostly on the hoods. I wonder if I shouldn't raise my bars. That way I'd use the drops more I think.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    I agree. I'm mostly on the hoods. I wonder if I shouldn't raise my bars. That way I'd use the drops more I think.
    That seems to be the most common argument for using compact handlebars. A lot of people for whatever reason, lack of flexibility, incorrect bike fittings and others have reach issues. There are now multiple choices compact, semi-compact, and traditional handlebars. Maybe you should play around with yours and see if you can find a height that is more comfortable for you?

    Maybe this thread can be used for other people who can see the point of more compact drops.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    That seems to be the most common argument for using compact handlebars. A lot of people for whatever reason, lack of flexibility, incorrect bike fittings and others compact, semi-compact, and traditional handlebars. Maybe you should play around with yours and see if you can find a height that is more comfortable for you?
    Rivendell recommended "Raise dat stem." I'm thinking handlebar height the same height as the saddle. Mine is currently a couple of centimeters below.

  23. #48
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    Raising your stem will simulate having less drop. You can do that before getting new bars. If you find a setup you like then you can fix it permanently with a nice new set of handlebars.

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