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  1. #176
    Rub it............
    Reputation: frdfandc's Avatar
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    Thread locker isn't really needed if the component is torque to the proper spec. But I've seen too much product installed without being torqued properly, probably why manufacturers use thread locker.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  2. #177
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    Thread locker isn't really needed if the component is torque to the proper spec. But I've seen too much product installed without being torqued properly, probably why manufacturers use thread locker.
    Aluminum bolts suck. I change over to nickel plated steel wherever possible. Grease the threads and it'll come off 4 years later, no problem. So easy to break aluminum bolts or strip out the threads. Never had any steel bolts come loose, get stuck, strip out, or break. Friends can't say that about their aluminum or carbon builds.

    With grease, I can torque it down just right by hand with the trusty L shaped allen wrench. The grease tells me when its tight very accurately on hard steel. There's an easily discernible point where the bolt snugs down, that's it. The only bolt I have to torque down to around 10 ft.# is the big seat clamp bolt on '80s Campy Super Record, when they went to a single bolt on a half moon shape from the Nuovo Record two bolt design.

    I understand grease isn't cool on carbon. Too bad. I guess that's why builders are going to "anti-seize," same as grease! Always viewed Locktite as the solution of last resort when nothing else works, viz. the components don't fit well together and loosen up under torques induced when riding. Now it seems to be standard. Thank the gods of lightweight for that. Anyone strip out the flats on an aluminum allen bolt Locktited in place?

  3. #178
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Why do people want to convert others to their chain lube regiment? Its like chain lube Jehovah Witnesses.
    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    Exactly. That's why I keep telling people... forget the homebrew, forget all those fancy new chain lubes. Get ProLink, the one and only Best Chain Lube. ProLink... It's got what chains crave.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Aluminum bolts suck. I change over to nickel plated steel wherever possible. Grease the threads and it'll come off 4 years later, no problem. So easy to break aluminum bolts or strip out the threads. Never had any steel bolts come loose, get stuck, strip out, or break. Friends can't say that about their aluminum or carbon builds.

    With grease, I can torque it down just right by hand with the trusty L shaped allen wrench. The grease tells me when its tight very accurately on hard steel. There's an easily discernible point where the bolt snugs down, that's it. The only bolt I have to torque down to around 10 ft.# is the big seat clamp bolt on '80s Campy Super Record, when they went to a single bolt on a half moon shape from the Nuovo Record two bolt design.

    I understand grease isn't cool on carbon. Too bad. I guess that's why builders are going to "anti-seize," same as grease! Always viewed Locktite as the solution of last resort when nothing else works, viz. the components don't fit well together and loosen up under torques induced when riding. Now it seems to be standard. Thank the gods of lightweight for that. Anyone strip out the flats on an aluminum allen bolt Locktited in place?
    That has absolutely nothing to do w/ what we've been discussing. We're talking about threaded fasteners not, for example, a carbon seatpost and/or an carbon frame. That is where you shouldn't use grease, instead you use carbon assembly paste. Has nothing to do w/ anti-seize either.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  4. #179
    Schuylkill Trail Bum
    Reputation: SPlKE's Avatar
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    I use a tiny bit of Phil Wood waterproof grease on threads, and torque 'em to spec.

    Never had a problem with them getting loose, or problems removing them at any point in the near or even distant future.

  5. #180
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    That has absolutely nothing to do w/ what we've been discussing. We're talking about threaded fasteners not, for example, a carbon seatpost and/or an carbon frame. That is where you shouldn't use grease, instead you use carbon assembly paste. Has nothing to do w/ anti-seize either.
    Ok, sorry.

    Just a side rant, casting grave suspicion on the strengths of carbon fiber when torqued down, as the picture of the above handlebars aptly illustrates!

  6. #181
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    New record for the most worn out pads ever...

    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  7. #182
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Bike owner must have been friggin deaf to not hear that.

  8. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    Bike owner must have been friggin deaf to not hear that.
    This was my first thought. And he must have been blind to not notice his discs were scored and most surely trashed.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  9. #184
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    They were probably dead before his last (rain) ride. Getting caught at the top of the mountain w/ brakes that are 99% gone will result in this. Definitely not an excuse, but a reason. The less they work the more you want to use them.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

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