CX's examples of how not to take care of your bike... - Page 8
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  1. #176
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    Thread locker isn't really needed if the component is torque to the proper spec. But I've seen too much product installed without being torqued properly, probably why manufacturers use thread locker.
    You can't fix stupid.

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  2. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    Thread locker isn't really needed if the component is torque to the proper spec. But I've seen too much product installed without being torqued properly, probably why manufacturers use thread locker.
    Aluminum bolts suck. I change over to nickel plated steel wherever possible. Grease the threads and it'll come off 4 years later, no problem. So easy to break aluminum bolts or strip out the threads. Never had any steel bolts come loose, get stuck, strip out, or break. Friends can't say that about their aluminum or carbon builds.

    With grease, I can torque it down just right by hand with the trusty L shaped allen wrench. The grease tells me when its tight very accurately on hard steel. There's an easily discernible point where the bolt snugs down, that's it. The only bolt I have to torque down to around 10 ft.# is the big seat clamp bolt on '80s Campy Super Record, when they went to a single bolt on a half moon shape from the Nuovo Record two bolt design.

    I understand grease isn't cool on carbon. Too bad. I guess that's why builders are going to "anti-seize," same as grease! Always viewed Locktite as the solution of last resort when nothing else works, viz. the components don't fit well together and loosen up under torques induced when riding. Now it seems to be standard. Thank the gods of lightweight for that. Anyone strip out the flats on an aluminum allen bolt Locktited in place?

  3. #178
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Why do people want to convert others to their chain lube regiment? Its like chain lube Jehovah Witnesses.
    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    Exactly. That's why I keep telling people... forget the homebrew, forget all those fancy new chain lubes. Get ProLink, the one and only Best Chain Lube. ProLink... It's got what chains crave.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Aluminum bolts suck. I change over to nickel plated steel wherever possible. Grease the threads and it'll come off 4 years later, no problem. So easy to break aluminum bolts or strip out the threads. Never had any steel bolts come loose, get stuck, strip out, or break. Friends can't say that about their aluminum or carbon builds.

    With grease, I can torque it down just right by hand with the trusty L shaped allen wrench. The grease tells me when its tight very accurately on hard steel. There's an easily discernible point where the bolt snugs down, that's it. The only bolt I have to torque down to around 10 ft.# is the big seat clamp bolt on '80s Campy Super Record, when they went to a single bolt on a half moon shape from the Nuovo Record two bolt design.

    I understand grease isn't cool on carbon. Too bad. I guess that's why builders are going to "anti-seize," same as grease! Always viewed Locktite as the solution of last resort when nothing else works, viz. the components don't fit well together and loosen up under torques induced when riding. Now it seems to be standard. Thank the gods of lightweight for that. Anyone strip out the flats on an aluminum allen bolt Locktited in place?
    That has absolutely nothing to do w/ what we've been discussing. We're talking about threaded fasteners not, for example, a carbon seatpost and/or an carbon frame. That is where you shouldn't use grease, instead you use carbon assembly paste. Has nothing to do w/ anti-seize either.
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  4. #179
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    I use a tiny bit of Phil Wood waterproof grease on threads, and torque 'em to spec.

    Never had a problem with them getting loose, or problems removing them at any point in the near or even distant future.

  5. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    That has absolutely nothing to do w/ what we've been discussing. We're talking about threaded fasteners not, for example, a carbon seatpost and/or an carbon frame. That is where you shouldn't use grease, instead you use carbon assembly paste. Has nothing to do w/ anti-seize either.
    Ok, sorry.

    Just a side rant, casting grave suspicion on the strengths of carbon fiber when torqued down, as the picture of the above handlebars aptly illustrates!

  6. #181
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    New record for the most worn out pads ever...

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  7. #182
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    Bike owner must have been friggin deaf to not hear that.

  8. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    Bike owner must have been friggin deaf to not hear that.
    This was my first thought. And he must have been blind to not notice his discs were scored and most surely trashed.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  9. #184
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    They were probably dead before his last (rain) ride. Getting caught at the top of the mountain w/ brakes that are 99% gone will result in this. Definitely not an excuse, but a reason. The less they work the more you want to use them.
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  10. #185
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    This isn't too bad, but is it really that hard to RTFM?

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  11. #186
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    Not sure I see what's up with this one other than curling the excess cable around. Am I missing something.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  12. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Another good reason to wash your bike...it's easier to see where your frame is broken. Guy had no idea this had happened, he was just bringing it in for a tune up.

    Maybe he's that guy -

    Kinda guy who says " hey! It wasn't broken like that when I brought it in!"

  13. #188
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    It's not done correctly, supposed to be under the part that holds the cable tension screw. It's something you'd do differently if you paid attention the manual/video. Small thing but it's kinda telling about the quality of the mechanic that did the work.
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  14. #189
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    CX's examples of how not to take care of your bike...

    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    This isn't too bad, but is it really that hard to RTFM?

    My new bike has one of those derailleurs and I RTFM and still don't understand it. The manual sucks and don't you think that derailleur is needlessly complicated? What's that allen screw for? Why such a complicated routing of the cable?

    Is this right?
    Last edited by mfdemicco; 01-24-2019 at 06:46 PM.

  15. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    My new bike has one of those derailleurs and I RTFM and still don't understand it. The manual sucks and don't you think that derailleur is needlessly complicated? What's that allen screw for? Why such a complicated routing of the cable?

    Is this right?
    It is correct on your bike. The screw that is sticking out is the one that adjusts cable tension by moving the link. It's specifically noted in the instructions and on the video. The new derailleurs are definitely a little more work to set up but the performance is good enough that it's worth it. The trick is to do them on a regular basis...which is hard if not impossible for the normal guy that doesn't work in a shop. I had to watch the video the first 8-10 times I had to set them up.
    Last edited by cxwrench; 01-25-2019 at 06:07 PM.
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  16. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It is correct on your bike. The screw that is sticking out is the one that adjusts cable tension by moving the link. It's specifically noted in the instructions and on the video. The new derailleurs are definitely a little more work to set up but the performance is good enough that it's worth it. The trick is to do them on a regular basis...which is hard if not impossible for the normal guy that doesn't work in a shop. I had to watch the video the first 8-10 times I had to set them up.
    I printed out the instructions. My first time doing the new FD adjustment took me 20-25 minutes. Even new bikes have to have the FD checked.

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    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  17. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I had to watch the video the first 8-10 times I had to set them up.
    Yoykes! If a well seasoned wrench like you had a hard time with it, imagine what it would be like for us home mechs. I'll stick with my 5800 and 6800, thank you!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Yoykes! If a well seasoned wrench like you had a hard time with it, imagine what it would be like for us home mechs. I'll stick with my 5800 and 6800, thank you!
    It's not hard, just have to be precise and follow the directions to the letter.

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    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  19. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    It's not hard, just have to be precise and follow the directions to the letter.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    Exactly, it's just like anything else you just have to get used to it and remember the steps. Definitely not difficult.
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  20. #195
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    The new Shimano FD cable routing does seem complex on the surface. However, it's really not hard once your know how to do it. It has so many advantages over the old system. No more barrel adjusters, no more wonky cable pull angles... Once it's set, it works so much better, regardless of how poorly the cable routing design on your frame might be.

    The 20-30 minutes I invested in learning how to set up the FD-R8000 was time well spent.

    They are cheap ($38 online).
    They are backwards compatible with your old 5800/6800 mechanical levers.
    They shift much more reliably with less stress and friction in the system.

    I'd take a FD-8000 over the 6800 version a thousand times and twice on Sunday.

  21. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Yoykes! If a well seasoned wrench like you had a hard time with it, imagine what it would be like for us home mechs. I'll stick with my 5800 and 6800, thank you!
    Heh. I was thinking the same thing.


  22. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It is correct on your bike. The screw that is sticking out is the one that adjusts cable tension by moving the link. It's specifically noted in the instructions and on the video. The new derailleurs are definitely a little more work to set up but the performance is good enough that it's worth it. The trick is to do them on a regular basis...which is hard if not impossible for the normal guy that doesn't work in a shop. I had to watch the video the first 8-10 times I had to set them up.
    first time i read shimano's instructions on routing that cable i was scratching my head, i was like WTH why do they do this. Then after putting everything together it made sense. I wish they would make their instructions with actual photos instead with simple schematic like photos. But I guess printing photos would cost more, and they know people will just throw these instructions away anyway

  23. #198
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    Most people don't throw the instructions away.... they put them in a safe place... never to be found again!
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  24. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Most people don't throw the instructions away.... they put them in a safe place... never to be found again!
    Yeah, the round file

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    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  25. #200
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    Customer: Yep, I normally do all my own work...

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