Di2 Operating Temperature
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  1. #1
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    Di2 Operating Temperature

    I was thinking of riding this morning and noticed the temperature outside was -14 degrees C. I then recalled the Di2 manual says the operating range for the battery is - 10 to 50 degrees C. Have any of you tried riding outside that range? I decided not to risk it this morning.

    Dancer

  2. #2
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    I'm probably going to be sorry that I asked...
    But what is the cause of your fear? What do you think is going to happen?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    I'm probably going to be sorry that I asked...
    But what is the cause of your fear? What do you think is going to happen?
    Batteries will often start to perform poorly at extremely cold temperatures.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by spade2you View Post
    Batteries will often start to perform poorly at extremely cold temperatures.
    It's not so much that they perform poorly, they tend to run out of energy quicker ... which for the Di2 system, shouldn't be a problem other than charging it a little more often.

    As for the motors ... unless water gets in there and freezes the motors, the derailleurs should work just fine.
    Snakebit: "How many times do I have to tell you that I don't have a source? I don't make a note of everything I see or hear on the internet and you don't have to take my word for it."

  5. #5
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    Its not going to asplode. I think he might be worried that he'll get stuck in a gear that he doesn't want to be in. As we all know that in winter time, car batteries are greatly affected by the cold ie. dead battery. But I think that Shimano's cold rating for its battery is in oem form. So depending on how your bike was set up could have an effect on that rating. If your setup was all internal, I think that that rating might be just on the conservative side. The only way to really tell is to just go out & try it & see what happens.

  6. #6
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    It was the manual that made me stop and reconsider. I have ridden in the cold (about minus 8 C) and not noticed anything, but not quite as cold as it was this morning. Getting stuck in one gear wouldn't be so bad but the possibilty of damaging the battery is another matter. I have to admit I can't imagine how that would happen.

    Dancer

    Quote Originally Posted by the mayor View Post
    I'm probably going to be sorry that I asked...
    But what is the cause of your fear? What do you think is going to happen?

  7. #7
    Online Wheel Builder
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    The Di2 system is tested in the exact same conditions as the mechanical system. I would not be so worried about the battery, you might notice it drain faster during the ride but there will be no permanent damage. What you will want to watch in extremely cold conditions is the wires, there is potential for them to crack.

  8. #8
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    Always wanted the di2 and now that i have it. Wow...

  9. #9
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    Chemistry 101

    Quote Originally Posted by Dancer View Post
    It was the manual that made me stop and reconsider. I have ridden in the cold (about minus 8 C) and not noticed anything, but not quite as cold as it was this morning. Getting stuck in one gear wouldn't be so bad but the possibilty of damaging the battery is another matter. I have to admit I can't imagine how that would happen.
    Batteries produce electricity via a chemical reaction. Most chemical reactions are slower as the temperature drops and therefore you get less current (rate of reaction = current in a battery) at lower temps. At some point there might not be enough current to power the deraileurs. However unless the material in the battery actually freezes and physically damages the battery it is extremely unlikely that cold would damage the battery. And it would have to be EXTREME cold.

  10. #10
    Velocipediologist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookiebiker View Post
    It's not so much that they perform poorly, they tend to run out of energy quicker
    mmmmmmmm....isn't that the same thing.
    I suppose defining 'poor performance' could be a a very broad subject.
    It gets cold, drains fast, but it still delivers the specified voltage. So it did not perform poorly?

    I always considered longevity as one of many performance parameters for a battery.
    Just thinking out loud.

  11. #11
    E_B
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    I can share observational data:
    - it works at -20C
    - at around -25C, it works for a few minutes as it cools off
    - at and below -25C don't expect it to work for long, you just freeze off in a certain gear.

    There doesn't appear to be any damage or issues with the derailleur. When the battery warms up again, it works again. I can't comment on how much lifespan reduction or capacity reduction the freezing is responsible for long term with the battery. Thus far, it doesn't seem notable.

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