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  1. #1
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    Do I Really Need a Fancy Chain for HG?

    With my mid-90s Dura Ace (7402 rear derailleur, and what I believe are Ultegra Hyperglide cogs), are there any old-school chains available that are for Hyperglide systems but that do not require me to either replace pins or deal with a master link? I want to be able to break a chain and reconnect it at any link, with a standard Rivoli/link tool. I don't want to deal with master links or having to replace a $3 pin every time I break the chain.

    Thanks in advance...

  2. #2
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mml373 View Post
    With my mid-90s Dura Ace (7402 rear derailleur, and what I believe are Ultegra Hyperglide cogs), are there any old-school chains available that are for Hyperglide systems but that do not require me to either replace pins or deal with a master link? I want to be able to break a chain and reconnect it at any link, with a standard Rivoli/link tool. I don't want to deal with master links or having to replace a $3 pin every time I break the chain.

    Thanks in advance...
    "Deal with master links"? Do you know how much easier that is compared to trying to press a regular pin back in? Shimano recommends to never push a regular connecting pin out then back in again. Dibs on your stuff if you insist on doing it. And if you're going to use a chain tool at least use a good one.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    "Deal with master links"? Do you know how much easier that is compared to trying to press a regular pin back in? Shimano recommends to never push a regular connecting pin out then back in again. Dibs on your stuff if you insist on doing it. And if you're going to use a chain tool at least use a good one.
    Back when I was a young road racer in the late 80s...I removed and reinstalled plenty of chains with a $5 Rivoli tool, without ever having change out links/pins. Never had any that bound up and stayed that way after a little side to side wiggle...and the removal/replacement process was always very simple.

    I think SRAM has a decent chain for this drivetrain (I understand the PC-870 is compatible)...so will look into that. Time to evolve, I guess. :-)

    Thank you for your reply.

  4. #4
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mml373 View Post
    Back when I was a young road racer in the late 80s...I removed and reinstalled plenty of chains with a $5 Rivoli tool, without ever having change out links/pins. Never had any that bound up and stayed that way after a little side to side wiggle...and the removal/replacement process was always very simple.

    I think SRAM has a decent chain for this drivetrain (I understand the PC-870 is compatible)...so will look into that. Time to evolve, I guess. :-)

    Thank you for your reply.
    The 870 is a good chain for sure. Most all of the current chains have pins that are tighter than older 5, 6, and 7 speed chains making it harder to push them back in...especially if you're using a small chain tool like a Rivoli. On 9, 10, and 11 it's even harder.
    I work for some bike racers
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  5. #5
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    I kinda miss the days when you could buy a $5 Sedisport chain and use it on your 5, 6 and 7 speed rigs. And push a pin out 5.5 turns to remove the chain.

  6. #6
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    You...remember...how...many...turns...it...took... ?

    I fondly recall those days...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mml373 View Post
    You...remember...how...many...turns...it...took... ?

    I fondly recall those days...
    Yeah, it kinda became ingrained when I was doing that every month to soak the chain in a double-boiler with paraffin.

    And after that I'd hook up the chain and get rid of the initial shards of wax, I'd then soften up my real chamois with nivea cream, put on my wool jersey and shorts (even during the summer), clip in my Detto cleats and ride my bike with a 42 x 21 low gear. Sigh. And I was a pack a day smoker back then....

  8. #8
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    Yup, seemed to be almost standard practice. Heheheheh. Wow I miss those days. And I miss being 15 back in those days, too!

  9. #9
    Rub it............
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    Use a master link. It's much easier than anything else. And pick up one of these to go into your pack.

    https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...ts/pack-pliers


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  10. #10
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    "Deal with master links"? Do you know how much easier that is compared to trying to press a regular pin back in? Shimano recommends to never push a regular connecting pin out then back in again. Dibs on your stuff if you insist on doing it. And if you're going to use a chain tool at least use a good one.
    God, that's the truth. Those chain tool made by Rivolti have pins that are made of lead, or some other soft metal.

    Master links are such a better way to connect a chain. I think most of the broken chains I had in the past were a result of the pin not being pushed in correctly. It's tricky to get it exactly right. No guessing with a link. I carry an extra with me in my bag, but I've never needed it in the 10 or so years I've been using links.

  11. #11
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    Thank you... ah, gadgets... :-)

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