drop to flat bars: what's needed?
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    248

    drop to flat bars: what's needed?

    I have an old Gunnar Crosshairs with drop bars, 9 speed Shimano 105 triple, standard 105 front derailleur, Deore XT rear derailleur, and SRAM cassette (I know, kind of wimpy, but there's big hills where I live). I'm thinking of converting it to a flat bar and am wondering what changes I'll have to make. Will I be able to keep the standard front derailleur? Can I use about any standard mountain bike 8 speed shifters? I figure I'll have to get an 8 speed cassette. Will I have to get smaller chainrings? Will I have to mess with the cables much, or basically just shorten them a little? Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    100% torqued
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    766
    Unless you are running a 31.8 bar and stem you will probably need a new stem and bar. Most road bike handle bars are 26.0 mm diameter at the clamp. Just measure. You can use your derailleurs, rings and cassette. You just need a 9 speed set of Shimano mtb shifters, or Sram/Gripshifters that are shimano compatible. I wouldn't switch to 8 speed, it is a little more trouble. Chain, cassette and harder to find 8 speed shifters are needed. Brake levers will need to be compatible with cantilevers or shortpull if that is what you run. If you run V's get V compatible and lose the travel adapter (pulley thing at the brake arm).

  3. #3
    Bike Dude
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    986
    Why? You will have a few more places to put your hands on using your drop bars. Why not stick with what you have?

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    248

    top tube a little long etc.

    Good question, but the top tube is a little long for me and I already have a short (about 10 cm) stem with a rise on the bike. I really like the bike though, and it can take fenders and larger tires, so I think it will become a city/commuter type bike. Adding bar ends will give me more options for hand positions.

  5. #5

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    142

    maybe try moustache bars

    I'm not sure if your shifters are on the brake levers or on the downtube, but in either case you may be able to keep the same levers and use some moustache bars:
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_m.html#moustache

    It might not be the most ergonomic way to use your levers (and maybe shifters) but if you use moustache bars instead of straight bars you might be able to keep the brake levers... the cabling just wont be as clean looking... but they will mount to the convex curved area. This might be the most budget friendly option though.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    248

    good idea

    Thanks for the idea, that is a possibility.

  7. #7

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    142
    There are also a number of similar bars in different shapes available that dont look quite so moustachey such as this one:

    https://sheldonbrown.com/harris/images/nittonorthrd.jpg

  8. #8
    wim
    wim is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,460
    Just an add-on thought to the classic "Rivendell" mustache bar: because these bars put your hands far forward of the stem clamp, they increase reach enormously. If you're comfortable with a 10 cm stem now, you'll have to use a 7 cm stem with the mustache bar to replicate your current reach. Not a big deal though—as long as you wind up with the same reach you have now, stem length is irrelevant.

    /
    Last edited by wim; 02-15-2008 at 02:42 PM.

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by ProsperityRed
    There are also a number of similar bars in different shapes available that dont look quite so moustachey such as this one:

    https://sheldonbrown.com/harris/images/nittonorthrd.jpg
    This is B302 Nitto All Rounder bar.
    It's cheaper and narrower (width is 51cm) than Nitto North Road (54 or 56cm). I think that North Road is more comfortable.
    They both, and many other city bars, have the 25.4mm clamp diameter while road bars usually have 26.0mm. You'll need a shim 25.4-26 to install it correctly.

    I found that trigger shifters are not comfortable with this handlebar because it is curved, and trigger shifters are made for the 90 degrees to the handlebar hand position. Grip shifters are more comfortable. I recommend 9-speed SRAM Attack. They work with Shimano rear derailleurs and have micro adjusting, the feature that helps to move the front derailleur a little bit to the right or left when the chain rubs.

    You'll probably have to buy new cables and housing because they can be longer.
    Also, you need to buy brake levers that work with road brakes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.