Drop Outs/Quick Release Not Holding Rear Wheel In Place
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  1. #1

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    Drop Outs/Quick Release Not Holding Rear Wheel In Place

    Never had this happen on any bike I've ever built or ridden.

    I can tighten up the quick release on the rear wheel but unless I REALLY tighten it up, the the wheel will end up moving in the dropouts and the tire/rim will rub against the left (non-drive) chainstay.

    This is an old Italian Olmo frame w/Campy dropouts.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    vexatious enigma
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    Crappy QR? It sounds like it's the QR that is the culprit. If anything you could go out and get a bolt on hub
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  3. #3
    Cycling induced anoesis
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    Quote Originally Posted by thevalvesource
    Never had this happen on any bike I've ever built or ridden.

    I can tighten up the quick release on the rear wheel but unless I REALLY tighten it up, the the wheel will end up moving in the dropouts and the tire/rim will rub against the left (non-drive) chainstay.

    This is an old Italian Olmo frame w/Campy dropouts.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks!
    The first thing that comes to mind is the axle extends (slightly) beyond the outer edge of the dropout, so you effectively tighten against IT rather than against the dropout.

    If that's not the culprit, try a different (enclosed cam) QR.
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    A traditional Campy or Shimano QR should remedy it.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    It could also have to do with dropout misalignment, particularly them not being parallel.
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  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    PJ352 may have the right answer. If the axle extension is too long beyond the locknut, or the dropout is too thin the QR head bottoms on the axle before pressing the frame. Remove the skewer and see if the axle ends slightly short of the face of the dropout. If not grind it a bit shorter.

    The other consideration is QR design. Old QR systems of the horizontal dropout era were paired with locknut faces designed to bite into the mild steel dropouts of the time and hold fast with low pressure.

    By contrast, modern bikes often have un-serrated lock nuts ( or aluminum axle faces), aluminum QR ends, and hardened frame dropouts. The combination cannot bite into the dropout and therefore requires much greater force to hold effectively by friction alone. It works fine with vertical dropouts, but won't hold well enough to resist the chain load when used with horizontal dropouts.
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  7. #7

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    Hmmmm ----------

    It has happened with two different rear wheels/QR's. I have been able to pull the rear wheels back into place and really tighten them and they'll hold.

    Its not out of the realm that the dropout is a little cocked although the bike shifts perfectly. I'll have a good local shop check the frame and dropout alignment.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    What brand

    Quote Originally Posted by thevalvesource
    It has happened with two different rear wheels/QR's. I have been able to pull the rear wheels back into place and really tighten them and they'll hold.
    But what brand of QRs are you using? Campy and Shimano internal cam steel shaft QRs have a lot more clamping power than the "fancy" QRs that come with many wheels or are sold separately. Absent some sort of mechanical issue (like the axle being too long), a good QR fixes this problem 90% of the time. The rest of the time, it comes from the chrome on the dropout being too hard, and it has to be roughed up with a grinder or file.

  9. #9
    What'd I do?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    But what brand of QRs are you using? Campy and Shimano internal cam steel shaft QRs have a lot more clamping power than the "fancy" QRs that come with many wheels or are sold separately. Absent some sort of mechanical issue (like the axle being too long), a good QR fixes this problem 90% of the time. The rest of the time, it comes from the chrome on the dropout being too hard, and it has to be roughed up with a grinder or file.
    Not even a good one, the $5 wheels mfg skewers (they have an internal cam) are my most common substitute.

  10. #10

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    I've used two different brands of QR's. One is indeed lightweight that came with a set of new wheels. The other is a set of older Omas QR's that have worked with several frames throughout the years.

    I've got a Dremel tool that'll work great to rough up the chrome on the Campy dropouts on this frame.

    I've also got a Dura Ace rear QR around as well as another set of wheels built with Campy hubs.

    Thanks for the hints!

  11. #11
    eRacer
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    If your axle is correct length, then it is probably the QR.
    Doubt Dropout Alignment would be a factor with a good QR.
    Never had any issues with Chrome on dropout being too hard.
    Get an old, strong, steel Campy or Shimano QR and I bet the problem will disappear.
    I have even used these QR's on FG with horizontal Track Drops without the wheel shifting.
    John Lapoint / San Diego
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  12. #12
    Roadie with unshaven legs
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    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html

    I would not take a Dremel to my dropouts to cure this issue. I have two old steel road bikes with chrome plated horizontal dropouts and both bikes have internal cam quick releases and I no longer have this issue.

    Something else to consider: the locking nut on the rear axles traditionally are shaped to grab the dropouts as well. Newer hubs don't seem to have this so that may be a part of the issue as well.

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