"Feel" of 6 N-m torque? (unsure trust torque wrench)
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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    "Feel" of 6 N-m torque? (unsure trust torque wrench)

    I am tightening up a Zipp carbon stem. The bolts (Ti I believe) require 6 N-m torque. I have a Park torque wrench (TW-1), which is in kg-cm units

    The conversion is: 1 newton meter = 10.197 kilogram centimeter

    so basically 60 kg-cm

    but at even 30 kg-cm, when I feel how tight they are with a reasonably long hex key, they seem already very tight. I am just now sure I trust, or rather should trust, the torque wrench. Any tips appreciated as I certainly do not want to damage the stem or, conversely, have my bars slip.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: mpk1996's Avatar
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    I have the same stem and used the tourqe wrench. then checked them with the long allen wrench. they felt nice and snug to me. i could still move the bolts if i had wanted to, but they were not "just barely in there"

    i would snug them up and give the bars a nice hard twist. if they don't move you are good. make sure to carry the allen wrench with you, and if they do move, just pull over and adjust them.

  3. #3
    Juanmoretime
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    Use Taxc Dynamic Paste and less torque for slip free grip. I prefer to error on the side of less and the paste allows you less torque and adds grip strength. Why accidentally destroy expensive parts.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  4. #4
    wim
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    Fun and games.

    Not as practical a suggestion than the previous posts, but I find helpful sometimes to remind myself what the numbers stand for. 60 kg-cm is a little awkward to translate into reality, but 6 Nm is also about 52 inch-pounds. This means 52 pounds of force applied at 90 degrees to the end of a 1-inch long lever would get you 60 kg-cm or 6 N-m.

    A lever twice as long means cutting the force in half, so a 26-pound push at the end of a 2-inch lever would result in the same torque again. The trick is to find out what a 26-pound push on a hex wrench feels to your finger or thumb . . .

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    feel...

    It only takes a modest twist with a short handled hex wrench or a 4-5-6 Y-style wrench to produce 6Nm of torque. NEVER use a long handle hex wrench on small M5 bolts. It's not necessary. There have been several reports of misread or malfunctioning torque wrenches resulting in over torqued and broken bolts. I never use a torque wrench on small bolts like these.
    Last edited by C-40; 07-15-2007 at 12:11 PM.

  6. #6
    Arrogant roadie.....
    Reputation: Dave_Stohler's Avatar
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    At work, I have access to a torque tool testing machine, and as a result, my torque wrenches are regularly calibrated. But, for those without access to such a machine, just remember that Torque = force * distance. If you want to see what 5 ft*lbs is on a torque wrench, hang a 5 lb weight exactly 1 foot from the center of rotation. If the wrench goes 'click' at just about 5 lbs, then it's calibrated. BTW, in industries such as machine building, calibrations of torque tools is usually 15%, so there is a lot of leeway here.
    We are the 801
    We are the central shaft

  7. #7
    MTBR Member
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    6Nm is not that tight in my opinion. i can get to that torque with a short allen key, without too much effort.

  8. #8

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    Turn it until you hear a crack or pop....you went past the 6NM point....

    Just kidding....buy a new torque wrench...

    Flash

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