help a newbie plan his build?
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    41

    help a newbie plan his build?

    Im in the process of finding a frame, and at the moment im deciding what components ill use. I come from a mtn bike background, my budget for everything, NOT including the frame is about 2500-3000.
    I've been thinking of starting with a cheaper/tough/beater wheelset so i can go nicer with the rest of the build, and get a good wheelset later down the road. I also plan to look around for good condition used stuff and deals, and piece everything together. (im good at it, saved 1000$ on my mtn bike build and ended up with quite a bit better components vs the stock build option)

    I like my shimano mtb derailleur and shifters, so thinking ill go that way, but im not too stubborn if someone wants to persuade me somewhere else. I want 11 speed, I was thinking of just going with dura ace everything, but id really like to try and drop a little bit of weight off the stock dura ace groupset, just not sure where to look, crankset? or if its just gonna be a case of saving little bits everywhere, headset, bb, cockpit, and tiny stuff like cable housing, chain, etc.. but if theres any big chunks of weight i can knock off anywhere without a big increase in money, ill definitely look there first.

    just not the wheelset, i'll invest in a good, light set down the road.

  2. #2
    Token Sprinter
    Reputation: RaptorTC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    644
    I'd definitely suggest at least trying out a few different Sram/Shimano/Campy bikes if for nothing but to try out the different shifter ergonomics. This is something that you can't really compare to a mtb drivetrain. All of them will shift just fine, but all of the brands will feel different in your hands. I like Shimano on the mtb, but I prefer Sram's road shifters.

    And if you're as interested in chasing weight without regards to price as it seems then Sram Red 22 is lighter than Dura Ace 9000.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    437
    If you truly are a newbie, Dura Ace is kind of a waste unless you like spending your money. As already mentioned, try out other brands before deciding. Sram will be the lightest, and less $ than Dura Ace. You can always mix and match manufactures models to save money as well. IMO since you are new, get yourself a decent frame, ultegra components (if you still want Shimano) and the rest to a nice wheelset.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    672
    Dura Ace 9000 crankset is the nicest piece of the groupset and the one place where for sure Shimano holds an advantage on their competition. That would be the last piece I'd substitute if springing for that groupset.

  5. #5
    A wheelist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,321
    You're bothering about lighter stuff than what top pro road racers use on bikes that come in below the UCI mandated weight? For us "normal" people, Ultegra is excellent stuff - and much more affordable and realistic. The Ultegra hubs are a touch on the heavy side with steel axles and cassette carrier. I subbed Dura-Ace hubs here instead. But for much less money (and lighter too) are the BikeHubStore.com hubs.
    .

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    41
    Maybe I'm just surprised with how cheap you can get a top of the line groupset compared to what you have to spend for a top of the line build for a mtn bike. So it doesn't seem like a huge deal to me. And I'm a big fan of doing it right the first time.

    I'm not a complete newbie when it comes to road bikes, I've done some rides with friends on their extra bikes and stayed with them, had an old track bike for awhile, just always concentrated on mtn biking. So overall I'm a strong biker, and don't wanna outgrow this in a year or two.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    672
    Quote Originally Posted by scandy1 View Post
    Maybe I'm just surprised with how cheap you can get a top of the line groupset compared to what you have to spend for a top of the line build for a mtn bike. So it doesn't seem like a huge deal to me. And I'm a big fan of doing it right the first time.

    I'm not a complete newbie when it comes to road bikes, I've done some rides with friends on their extra bikes and stayed with them, had an old track bike for awhile, just always concentrated on mtn biking. So overall I'm a strong biker, and don't wanna outgrow this in a year or two.
    Huh? Since you are open to high end groups from different manufacturers you clearly aren't on Pro deal. XTR 980 is 1700-1900 for the whole groupset on Ebay. So is Dura Ace 9000. I've always seen the opposite, it will cost you more to get the absolute highest end road stuff as compared to highest end mtb stuff. Specialized Epic S Works is 10K, the Mclaren Venge is like 15K. The Epic has full suspension and disc brakes so I would assume more R&D and more cost (relies more on outside suppliers rather than inhouse branded product) yet the road market will pay a premium to have "the best". Sidi charges $50 more for the Wire than it does the Drako. They are essentially the same shoe but the road market will bear the higher cost.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,641
    Quote Originally Posted by scandy1 View Post
    Im in the process of finding a frame, and at the moment im deciding what components ill use. I come from a mtn bike background, my budget for everything, NOT including the frame is about 2500-3000.
    I've been thinking of starting with a cheaper/tough/beater wheelset so i can go nicer with the rest of the build, and get a good wheelset later down the road. I also plan to look around for good condition used stuff and deals, and piece everything together. (im good at it, saved 1000$ on my mtn bike build and ended up with quite a bit better components vs the stock build option)

    I like my shimano mtb derailleur and shifters, so thinking ill go that way, but im not too stubborn if someone wants to persuade me somewhere else. I want 11 speed, I was thinking of just going with dura ace everything, but id really like to try and drop a little bit of weight off the stock dura ace groupset, just not sure where to look, crankset? or if its just gonna be a case of saving little bits everywhere, headset, bb, cockpit, and tiny stuff like cable housing, chain, etc.. but if theres any big chunks of weight i can knock off anywhere without a big increase in money, ill definitely look there first.

    just not the wheelset, i'll invest in a good, light set down the road.
    I think Dura Ace will eat up your budget. 11 speed on its own is nothing special. Better choices would be to research used 7800 or go with 105. Agree on toning down the wheel set. There are lots of good quality wheels for just a few hundred with the sole failing they weigh 300 grams too much.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,641
    Quote Originally Posted by JSWhaler View Post
    If you truly are a newbie, Dura Ace is kind of a waste unless you like spending your money. As already mentioned, try out other brands before deciding. Sram will be the lightest, and less $ than Dura Ace. You can always mix and match manufactures models to save money as well. IMO since you are new, get yourself a decent frame, ultegra components (if you still want Shimano) and the rest to a nice wheelset.
    Started riding more this winter and at a particular biker stop developed a habit of looking at what group sets the various bikes have. Unlike the summer where you find more newbies, by and large the top group set seems to be Ultegra. It's really the most practical.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: stevesbike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    5,606
    if weight is your goal, go with SRAM22, which is about 170 grams lighter than dura-ace 9000. Also, weight weenies and the forums on fairwheel bikes are good places for real weights. Like you say, you can build it for a lot less if you keep an eye out for good prices (the UK websites are a good place to look too).

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: bigjohnla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    502
    To each his own obviously. The one thing you will find out quickly is that building up a bike from scratch is very expensive compared to buying a complete bike. Personally I would find a complete bike I liked and then tweak it as you go. You may find a 105 or Ultegra equipped bike more than suits you well enough to allow you to concentrate on wheels, bars and pedals.

  12. #12
    ngl
    ngl is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    710
    Just my 2 cents worth but another option might be buying the 11 speed ultegra group (or something equivalent from the other guys) for about $800...a set of light 11 speed wheels for about $500 (light aluminum or the chinese carbon will weigh about 1400 grams)...and get all the add-ons (seat, post, stem, bars, pedals etc) new or used from ebay for about $500. With the price of a frame you could have a 16 pound bike on the road for under $3000.
    Just a couple of notes: remember to coordinate things like your bottom bracket style and seat post diameter with your frame purchase, and, make sure you have a LBS willing to do the assembly unless you plan on doing everything yourself.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    41
    I found some decent deals on ebay and elsewhere on the hollowgram cannondale cranks both the old and new models (with the spider ring), they seem like very nice cranks, also looking at the rotor agilis cranks but havent heard much about them, but from what ive read they seem nice too. and both would be a nice weight drop. any input?

    also, coming from my mtn biking background im tempted to go with thompson for their seat, stem, and possibly handlebars, because of their reputation in mtn biking. who else should i look at as a lightweight but strong competitor to thompson?

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,450
    First, don't listen to the don't spend that much money posts. If you want to spend that money on a bike, spend it. 105 is not nearly the group that DA is. Ultegra is close. Similar to the price and quality difference between xt and xtr. Can you really tell the difference when riding - possibly a tiny bit. If you could chose b/t xt and xtr - xtr every time. Same with ultegra and DA.

    With your budget, you are going to get much more bike for the money if you buy a fully built new ride. e.g. Focus Izalco Pro 1.0 Dura Ace 2013 from bikebling $3360 - full DA 11 spd.

    As far as a full build: The choice of gruppo (campagnolo), bro-set (SRAM), or group-san (Shimano) is a more important than bars and seat post. Purchasing a complete group is within your budget and is less expensive than piecing together a full group.

    If you have a frame, make sure you chose cranks that fit its BB "standard".

    If I was looking for a complete build, I would go with campy record over dura ace. Campy is art. It lasts for years and years. It immediately sets your bike apart from nearly every other bike you normally see. Check out the build kits on coloradocyclist. Several record kits (everything but frame) for under $3000.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    5,034
    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    First, don't listen to the don't spend that much money posts. If you want to spend that money on a bike, spend it. 105 is not nearly the group that DA is. Ultegra is close. Similar to the price and quality difference between xt and xtr. Can you really tell the difference when riding - possibly a tiny bit. If you could chose b/t xt and xtr - xtr every time. Same with ultegra and DA.

    With your budget, you are going to get much more bike for the money if you buy a fully built new ride. e.g. Focus Izalco Pro 1.0 Dura Ace 2013 from bikebling $3360 - full DA 11 spd.

    As far as a full build: The choice of gruppo (campagnolo), bro-set (SRAM), or group-san (Shimano) is a more important than bars and seat post. Purchasing a complete group is within your budget and is less expensive than piecing together a full group.

    If you have a frame, make sure you chose cranks that fit its BB "standard".

    If I was looking for a complete build, I would go with campy record over dura ace. Campy is art. It lasts for years and years. It immediately sets your bike apart from nearly every other bike you normally see. Check out the build kits on coloradocyclist. Several record kits (everything but frame) for under $3000.
    That part in red. Road is a bit different than mtb. A lot more things "go together."

    Unless there is something special you want or need, then find a bike that is ready to go. You get better economies of scale that way. The only thing you might not get is the wheel set you want.
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    131
    the only thing i want to throw out there re: campy, ride one and see if you like the thumb shifters. for me, i hated them, and i've got big hands. when their shift levers came out and i saw how they had the thumb shifting i thought i was going to love them, when i test rode a bike with campy i hated them.

    as with all this stuff, to each their own.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    41
    Maybe I should clear up why I'm looking at the "expensive stuff" I'm trying to do a more road oriented all rounder, still haven't found a frame yet, but got some in mind, going with a more stable, bigger tire, tougher road bike, it's obviously gonna be heavier, and I really want to keep a lot of that light racey feel, at least as much as I can. If I could get the total weight to be in the 16-17lb range rather than the hovering around 20+ range that a cheaper build will get me, that would be perfect. I've ridden some 20lb bikes, and some 15lb bikes, and there's a pretty significant difference in feel that just the lighter weight gave me.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,450
    On a relative scale: Wheel and tire weight have more impact on perceived weight than lighter frame/group. For example, a light frame and components will feel slower (during acceleration/speed changes/cornering) with heavy wheels and tires than the same bike would feel with lighter wheels/tires.

    I am not sure what you are trying to achieve. Cyclocross, touring bike, 29er mountain bike built with road components and a drop bar, "gravel grinder" - I didn't even want to type that - the mtb marketing categories are infecting road bike marketing: gravel grinder, endurance bike, etc.

    Possibly look at a lower group and better (lighter/stronger) wheels. That way you may get the best bang for your buck.

    If you want better advice, explain your complete goal (frames in mind). Piecemeal additions to your desires just make it more confusing.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    41
    I'm looking at bikes like the salsa colossal, Gunnar sport, honey winterando, something all arounder, able to fit big tires, but still with a road bike fast sporty feel. Most rides will be 1-4 hour fast road rides and commutes. But want to be able to do the occasional all day rides, paved/gravel mix, etc.. So component wise, looking for light stuff to keep it light and sporty, don't want to end up with some 20lb+ bike.

    so lightweight is important, but not to the point of going to a feather weight unreliable delicate build. Still needs to be able to hit the occasional debris and take some dirt and abuse. I was told SRAM is a good bet in terms of tough/reliable? Would you guys agree? If so that would be great because they happen to make some of the lightest stuff as well.
    disregarding reliability, I think I'm leaning towards campagnolo record and the new comp ultra over torque crankset. That'd set me back 1500 for everything I need. Where something like ultegra would be about 950. That's not a bad price difference for the weight/quality difference.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: shoemakerpom2010's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    155
    Everybody is making this very difficult. Pick your frame that you think you will be happy with for a while, Pick your wheels that you can live with for a long while that are light enough to your satisfaction and strong enough to handle your riding skills and see what you have left.. With that money see what group you can get into and factor in any shop charge if you think you might have a problem then only then start looking at exotic cracks, handle bars and things if you still have money. Most people spend less on wheels from the start only to be kicking themselves after they spent the most on the things that can replaced later that don't affect handling as much or cost as much...

  21. #21
    ngl
    ngl is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    710
    I don't mean to be critical, but, I don't think you are ready to build a road bike that you will be happy with based your previous posts and questions. There are too many factors involved (just to name a few):
    Frame: type, material, geometry, size
    BB type: various types that must be matched to your frame
    Component group: vendor, quality
    Handle Bar & Stem: sizing, length
    Cassette sizing: ???
    I recommend you go in to your LBS(s) and trying a few bikes out and purchase a good bike (at your price point) from a good shop and join a cycling group. Ride it for a year or so, compare your bike to what others ride, ask questions and learn. You can always build that dream bike next year. Just my opinion.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,450
    Quote Originally Posted by scandy1 View Post
    I think I'm leaning towards campagnolo record and the new comp ultra over torque crankset. That'd set me back 1500 for everything I need. Where something like ultegra would be about 950.
    Your math seems fuzzy. I am not sure where you are getting an record gruppo plus build kit for $1500. $1500 may be pushing it for an Ultegra build.

    After purchasing an eight piece gruppo, you still need: headset, spacers, wheels, tubes, tires, pedals, handlebar, bar tape, stem, saddle, seatpost, and the knowledge/tools to build it.

    Until you learn a bit more about what you want, I agree that finding a good LBS and purchasing there may result in a more informed choice.

    Look at the new cyclocross bikes with disc brakes. If you want something new and interesting, how about the new niner RLT 9 with sram force.

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    Your math seems fuzzy. I am not sure where you are getting an record gruppo plus build kit for $1500. $1500 may be pushing it for an Ultegra build.

    After purchasing an eight piece gruppo, you still need: headset, spacers, wheels, tubes, tires, pedals, handlebar, bar tape, stem, saddle, seatpost, and the knowledge/tools to build it.

    Until you learn a bit more about what you want, I agree that finding a good LBS and purchasing there may result in a more informed choice.

    Look at the new cyclocross bikes with disc brakes. If you want something new and interesting, how about the new niner RLT 9 with sram force.
    Ive got calipers already, so I'm looking at 5 piece kits plus a crankset. I was just saying 1500ish for a record 5 piece and crankset, vs around 900 for ultegra isn't bad. And yes I've factored everything else I need into my price, I've built plenty of bikes.

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    41
    I know I want steel, I've ridden steel carbon and al and like steel most. And I don't see the big deal about bb type? I'll get what works for my frame, component group, I've got some experience with different components, but nothing high end/new. That's what this thread is for anyway, I know what size stem to get and what handlebar sizing I like, cassette I'm thinking 12-25.
    Mi have tested some bikes, demoed some, ridden friends bikes, owned one road bike, one commuter, and tons of mtn bikes. I'm pretty comfortable in saying what I like and want vs what I don't want.

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,641
    Quote Originally Posted by scandy1 View Post
    I know I want steel, I've ridden steel carbon and al and like steel most. And I don't see the big deal about bb type? I'll get what works for my frame, component group, I've got some experience with different components, but nothing high end/new. That's what this thread is for anyway, I know what size stem to get and what handlebar sizing I like, cassette I'm thinking 12-25.
    Mi have tested some bikes, demoed some, ridden friends bikes, owned one road bike, one commuter, and tons of mtn bikes. I'm pretty comfortable in saying what I like and want vs what I don't want.
    If you go to a professional bike shop, such as a Signature Cycle in New York, although there are others, they will measure you , find out how you ride the bike and what kind of riding you do, typical cadence etc, and will select the right gear ratios, whether you should have a compact crank etc, and whether tubes should be extra stiff or compliant. I think its a mistake to get caught up in the bike specs, and instead focus on what your requirements are and let a professional bike shop assist you. You could find that if you build based on what you think you need or want that you end up with a Franken-bike.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Advice for newbie wheel build?
    By castofone in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-16-2012, 08:59 AM
  2. Newbie build
    By SockToy in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-16-2011, 01:18 PM
  3. My R3-SL build plan
    By ralph1 in forum Cervelo
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-01-2010, 07:18 PM
  4. Build Advice for newbie
    By therollex in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-10-2009, 04:54 PM
  5. My road bike build plan
    By DaveAZ in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 01-07-2008, 12:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.