Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 35
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    2

    Help with upgrade

    In 2002 I had my Calfee Luna Pro built with 9sp Ultagra. Life got in the way for a few years, and I am back on the bike.
    But I need lower gears now. My lowest now is a 39/28. I see the new 11sp setup has a 34/32.

    My question is, is the quality of new Shimno 105 comparable to my old Ultagra. Or should I just buy a new bike.

  2. #2
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,405
    New 105 is really good stuff, I wouldn't hesitate recommending it if you want to upgrade your drivetrain. Your bike might have an Italian threaded bottom bracket to confirm that before you order a new one.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  3. #3
    Out riding.
    Reputation: 1500SLR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    90
    There's nothing wrong with 105 today if that's what your asking. You will need a medium cage derailleur to run a 32t properly though without cross chaining. You can try a Sora medium cage derailleur and an 11-32 on your existing bike before replacing the whole groupset if you would like to try it first but you might find the jump between gears to be a bit excessive. Shimano works on a hand me down system so Sora would be about equivalent to what your 9 speed Ultegra was all those years ago.
    Last edited by 1500SLR; 10-08-2018 at 11:50 AM.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    20,838
    Quote Originally Posted by sokal View Post
    In 2002 I had my Calfee Luna Pro built with 9sp Ultagra. Life got in the way for a few years, and I am back on the bike.
    But I need lower gears now. My lowest now is a 39/28. I see the new 11sp setup has a 34/32.

    My question is, is the quality of new Shimno 105 comparable to my old Ultagra. Or should I just buy a new bike.
    The lower gear you cite is 25% lower than what you have now. It might make sense to just replace the crank with a compact (34/50) crank and see if that is low enough for you.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,684
    As others have stated, 105 is really good stuff. It's considered the "work horse" of Shimano components.

    You could probably get a good deal on a 5800 generation 105 set as the newest one is the 7000. I have bikes with both 5800 and 6800 and they both shift flawlessly. I can't tell the difference, so unless you get get an ultra-sweet deal on 6800, I would stick with the 5800. Keep in mind that you will need the whole drivetrain including the derailleurs as the actuation ratios are different from your existing drive train.

    But beware! Check first to make sure your rear wheel has an 11-speed compatible freehub, or you could end up having to spend $$ on a new rear wheel!

    Or......you could first replace just the crankset with a compact 34/50 like Kerry suggested and see if that helps you enough on the hills.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    2
    Thank you everyone for your input. looks like 5800 is what I will aim for I will have to build new wheels as my hub is not compatible with 11sp.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    161
    The new r7000 105 groupset is actually around the same price as 5800 & can be found even cheaper on the bay. It is more refined than the last generation & surpasses 6800 in terms of ergonomics & performance but not weight. Last gen was good but why settle for last gen when you can have current generation groupset for the same price. $425 r7000 vs $415 5800 from just a preliminary search.
    Last edited by stan01; 10-09-2018 at 09:40 AM.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nova_rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    113
    Going back to your original question, given that it's end of the season, you may want to check out closeout deals out there on 105 shod bikes rather than retrofitting the old one.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    8
    I agree with going with a 50/34 crank first.

    As for groupset the 5800 is awesome. The weight penalty of 5800 from 6800 or 9000 isn't worth price. I would get a medium cage rear derailleur. The short cage derailluer do work on 11/32 but I get poor slow jumpy shifting vs using a 11/28.

    I still ride on 9 speed and find it cheaper for parts and works with road or mtb shifters. using a 9 speed mtb rear derailluers allows you to use larger cassettes like 11-36 or even a 40. Though running a crankset over 50 puts a lot of strain on the chain.

  10. #10
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,405
    Quote Originally Posted by greycat View Post
    I agree with going with a 50/34 crank first.

    As for groupset the 5800 is awesome. The weight penalty of 5800 from 6800 or 9000 isn't worth price. I would get a medium cage rear derailleur. The short cage derailluer do work on 11/32 but I get poor slow jumpy shifting vs using a 11/28.

    I still ride on 9 speed and find it cheaper for parts and works with road or mtb shifters. using a 9 speed mtb rear derailluers allows you to use larger cassettes like 11-36 or even a 40. Though running a crankset over 50 puts a lot of strain on the chain.
    An SS (short) derailler rarely works on a 32, it's spec'd to only work w/ a 28. You're forgetting that the length of the cage also wraps the extra chain you'll need for the 32, so even if it does shift to the 32 it won't have enough chain.
    As for 9 speed mtb derailleurs there isn't one made that is spec'd to work w/ a 40 tooth large cog. Larger chainrings don't put any more 'strain' on the chain than a 50, either. You've missed on all 3 things you tried to provide advice about. I'd give up while until you figure some things out. Giving no advice is better than giving poor advice.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,684
    Quote Originally Posted by greycat View Post
    I agree with going with a 50/34 crank first.

    As for groupset the 5800 is awesome. The weight penalty of 5800 from 6800 or 9000 isn't worth price. I would get a medium cage rear derailleur. The short cage derailluer do work on 11/32 but I get poor slow jumpy shifting vs using a 11/28.

    I still ride on 9 speed and find it cheaper for parts and works with road or mtb shifters. using a 9 speed mtb rear derailluers allows you to use larger cassettes like 11-36 or even a 40. Though running a crankset over 50 puts a lot of strain on the chain.
    A short cage derailleur with an 11-32T cassette is a hack at best. The chain will either be too short in the large-large combo or too long in the small-small combo. If you size the chain long, shifting will be clunky. If you size the chain short, you damn well better remember to never, ever shift to the large-large combo unless you enjoy potentially catastrophic results.

    A 9-speed mountain bike derailleur will not work with 11-speed shifters. Actuation ratio is different.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,713
    11 spd 5800 level 105 components are better than Ultegra 9 and 10. The 5800 series front derailer especially is a big improvement, the shifts are flawless. I've used all 3 systems extensively, as BTW.

    105 is the sweet spot for Shimano mechanical, price vs. weight vs. performance and the reviews generally support that.

  13. #13
    Out riding.
    Reputation: 1500SLR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by greycat View Post
    The short cage derailluer do work on 11/32 but I get poor slow jumpy shifting vs using a 11/28.
    MAYBE work... if you have the limiter screw winded all the way out... and not in a combination of your highest and lowest gears and vice versa on each cog... and yes I do use my bottom gear, particularly on hills. So I would say its best not to hav your limiter screw out this far. Just get a medium cage derailleur. There is no real world penalty for this.

    If you're going to correct me you should perhaps understand why.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    8
    I've use 50-34 with a 32 rear only on small big. What tool rides large large, maybe 58 1x souche egos that want to trash in treads do.

    As for the 9 speed I separated, and again, assuming that descent brain would associate using 9 speed components not twiddle dee 11 speed out of nowhere.

    I don't ask for others justification nor did i write here to berate I wanted to help. yet somehow trash is to be expected in a place that communicates like its before 2000.

    As for hacking god forbid anyone do anything unique or try not getting stiffed buying more than you need.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    563
    Quote Originally Posted by greycat View Post
    I've use 50-34 with a 32 rear only on small big. What tool rides large large, maybe 58 1x souche egos that want to trash in treads do.

    As for the 9 speed I separated, and again, assuming that descent brain would associate using 9 speed components not twiddle dee 11 speed out of nowhere.

    I don't ask for others justification nor did i write here to berate I wanted to help. yet somehow trash is to be expected in a place that communicates like its before 2000.

    As for hacking god forbid anyone do anything unique or try not getting stiffed buying more than you need.
    You gave bad advice that worked in your circumstance but may very well not in others, possibly with catastrophic results. People called you out on it. There's no need to be so sensitive - there are some knowlegable folk here, and they don't want to see folks get bad answers to their questions.

  16. #16
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,405
    Quote Originally Posted by greycat View Post
    I've use 50-34 with a 32 rear only on small big. What tool rides large large, maybe 58 1x souche egos that want to trash in treads do.

    As for the 9 speed I separated, and again, assuming that descent brain would associate using 9 speed components not twiddle dee 11 speed out of nowhere.

    I don't ask for others justification nor did i write here to berate I wanted to help. yet somehow trash is to be expected in a place that communicates like its before 2000.

    As for hacking god forbid anyone do anything unique or try not getting stiffed buying more than you need.
    EVERY modern road drivetrain is designed to work big/big. Doing that doesn't make someone a tool. Giving crap advice on the other hand does. If you can't spell correctly or use proper grammar, I guess you can't figure out how a bicycle is supposed to work. You really did ask for it after post #14.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  17. #17
    Out riding.
    Reputation: 1500SLR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    90
    I like to spend as much time as I can in my big dog as do a lot of other riders so giving bad advice is exactly that and if you can't handle being called out, find somewhere else to post please.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,684
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    The 5800 series front derailer especially is a big improvement, the shifts are flawless.
    It's actually the front shifter that is the big improvement. Unlike previous Shimano front shifters, the 5800/6800/9000 and beyond have a trim adjustment going down from the big to small ring so chain drops are non-existent unless you get trigger finger downshifting. The older shifters would drop you all the way down.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: walrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    502
    Just a few days ago replaced my 16 year old Ultegra kit I built in 2003 with 105 R7000. The R7000 was only $49 more than the 5800 set, it just came out this year. I have the 34-50 crankset, the improvement is amazing, it's a huge upgrade. I'm 69 years old and need a bailout gear for some of the hills here in the mountains where I ride. I put on a Wolf Tooth Road Link on the rear derailleur so I could use a MTB cassette.

  20. #20
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,405
    Quote Originally Posted by walrus View Post
    Just a few days ago replaced my 16 year old Ultegra kit I built in 2003 with 105 R7000. The R7000 was only $49 more than the 5800 set, it just came out this year. I have the 34-50 crankset, the improvement is amazing, it's a huge upgrade. I'm 69 years old and need a bailout gear for some of the hills here in the mountains where I ride. I put on a Wolf Tooth Road Link on the rear derailleur so I could use a MTB cassette.
    Be careful with that...it doesn't magically make the cage any longer but it does allow you to get onto a larger cog. Hopefully you can size the chain correctly and not rip the derailleur off the bike. I don't think very highly of these things for just that reason.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: GlobalGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    364
    Quote Originally Posted by sokal View Post

    My question is, is the quality of new Shimno 105 comparable to my old Ultagra. Or should I just buy a new bike.
    Yes.

    Plus in the Shimano lineup, it's IMO the best bang for the buck.

  22. #22
    Out riding.
    Reputation: 1500SLR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Be careful with that...it doesn't magically make the cage any longer but it does allow you to get onto a larger cog. Hopefully you can size the chain correctly and not rip the derailleur off the bike. I don't think very highly of these things for just that reason.
    I don't either... If you really want to run a dinner plate sized cog on your cassette then you should have the appropriate derailleur to do so unless you want to get 15minutes down the road and realize you need that new derailleur anyway.

  23. #23
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,405
    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    I don't either... If you really want to run a dinner plate sized cog on your cassette then you should have the appropriate derailleur to do so unless you want to get 15minutes down the road and realize you need that new derailleur anyway.
    ^Exactly^
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: walrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    502
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Be careful with that...it doesn't magically make the cage any longer but it does allow you to get onto a larger cog. Hopefully you can size the chain correctly and not rip the derailleur off the bike. I don't think very highly of these things for just that reason.
    It does drop the rear derailleur down about 3/4 of an inch. Then I took the B screw out and put it in backwards, I can drop the jockey wheels over a 1/2 inch below the 40 cog if I want, but I leave less. I have plenty of chain.

  25. #25
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,405
    Quote Originally Posted by walrus View Post
    It does drop the rear derailleur down about 3/4 of an inch. Then I took the B screw out and put it in backwards, I can drop the jockey wheels over a 1/2 inch below the 40 cog if I want, but I leave less. I have plenty of chain.
    How?
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Upgrade, upgrade, upgrade... but when to consider the frame and fork?
    By OldZaskar in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 08-14-2014, 06:37 PM
  2. To upgrade or not to upgrade...help!
    By jamesmoody in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-22-2012, 11:24 AM
  3. upgrade or upgrade?
    By Radio63 in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 06-22-2009, 09:43 AM
  4. Wheel upgrade or Bikes Direct/Frame upgrade
    By flat ark in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-07-2007, 12:05 PM
  5. To Upgrade or Not to Upgrade
    By EE33 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 08-30-2005, 05:03 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.