How would you remove corrosion?
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Tourist
    Reputation: Pierre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    987

    How would you remove corrosion?

    How would you remove corrosion on the Honjo fender in the photo? Some unknown but very corrosive liquid fell on some parts of a bike. How would you restore this to some kind of shiny state? For the rust on the Tubus rack I already found a solution, I sanded it lightly with 400 grit paper, it worked fine and didn't noticeably make the spots too shiny. I don't know how to deal with the fender though. Thanks!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3,319
    Is that fender alum? if so just sand it too, maybe with steel wool final .... you'll probably want to spray coat it with clear coat.
    BANNED

  3. #3
    Tourist
    Reputation: Pierre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    987
    Yes it is aluminum. Online search seems to indicate bronze wool (slightly better than steel wool) then metal polish. Somewhere else I read to use cream of tartar.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,821
    I've heard and seen videos of using cola to remove surface rust. Maybe a small portion can be tested.

  5. #5
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    10,763
    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    I've heard and seen videos of using cola to remove surface rust. Maybe a small portion can be tested.
    Vinegar works, too. It smells worse, but isn’t as sticky.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,992
    I thought navel jelly and scotch bright pads and happened upon this. Might be some suggestions worth pursuing. My Honjo's have developed dull spots, but nothing like that.

    Removing Oxidation From Aluminum - Moderated Discussion Areas
    Too old to ride plastic

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    95
    I've used steel wool, then polish. I've made a paste with baking soda and used that before. A convenient, ready made compound is toothpaste. Make sure it's not a 'gel' type toothpaste. It might be tough to match the dull matte finish; you may have to play around a bit.

    As duriel mentioned, some type of coating after polishing helps delay the oxidation's return.

  8. #8
    Done
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    4,509
    Quote Originally Posted by Pierre View Post
    How would you remove corrosion on the Honjo fender in the photo? Some unknown but very corrosive liquid fell on some parts of a bike. How would you restore this to some kind of shiny state? For the rust on the Tubus rack I already found a solution, I sanded it lightly with 400 grit paper, it worked fine and didn't noticeably make the spots too shiny. I don't know how to deal with the fender though. Thanks!
    Don't put steel wool or sandpaper on that finish. And don't spray it with a clear coat.

    Do use Wenol Red (in a tube) or Nevr Dull (cotton wadding) metal polish, a soft cloth, and lots of elbow grease. Or use auto rubbing compound. When you get it to a finish that you like, put some automotive wax on it. Yes, you will need to polish it up from time to time, but spraying with a clear from the hardware store to keep it from going dull is asking for trouble.

    If you have access to a cloth buffing wheel and a bench grinder, even better.
    It's Been Fun...See You Down The Road.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Srode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,481
    Never Dull works great polishing aluminum. It's not going to get rid of heavy pitting, you would need to wet sand that smooth I think, with 1000 or ultrafine (2000) grit sand paper before the Never Dull (if it's pitted). Not a fast process but it would get it where you want it I think. I fought many an aluminum mag wheel with that stuff years ago. If you get too much shine running over it with 000 steal wool would do the trick I think.

    I like the idea of using a buffing wheel on a grinder but you REALLY need to be careful with that - if it grabs the fender it can do a lot of damage to the fender, you, or anything in the area when it takes off.
    Gravel Rocks

    Trek Domane
    Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike)
    BH G7 Disc
    Trek Crockett

  10. #10
    Done
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    4,509
    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    Never Dull works great polishing aluminum. It's not going to get rid of heavy pitting, you would need to wet sand that smooth I think, with 1000 or ultrafine (2000) grit sand paper before the Never Dull (if it's pitted). Not a fast process but it would get it where you want it I think. I fought many an aluminum mag wheel with that stuff years ago. If you get too much shine running over it with 000 steal wool would do the trick I think.

    Polishing old mags? Cool!

    I like the idea of using a buffing wheel on a grinder but you REALLY need to be careful with that - if it grabs the fender it can do a lot of damage to the fender, you, or anything in the area when it takes off.
    You are right that Nevr dull won't get rid of pits. I was trying to suggest something that would give the OP a shot at salvaging the existing brushed finish on the fender and not end up with a mottled finish. Personally, I'd just clean it up and ignore the pits - you won't be able to see them from 5 feet away.

    The other complication is that the fenders probably (just a guess) have a clear anodizing to prevent corrosion - if you bring out the big guns you pretty much have to remove all of the coating to get a uniform look.

    You are also 100% right that a buffing wheel is one of the quickest ways to ruin a piece of metal. I've had mine snatch crank arms out of my hand and fling them across the garage. It is a light touch - let the compound do the work.
    It's Been Fun...See You Down The Road.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,992
    Or leave as is.

    Beausage=honest wear from using the bike.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #12
    Tourist
    Reputation: Pierre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    987
    That Nevr Dull product is AMAZING ! I used 400, 600 and 1500 sandpaper on the big damage (because that's what I had at home). Then a metal polish liquid from Home Depot called Basso. And then Nevr Dull.

    But really, the star of the show is that Nevr Dull. I was expecting wax-type abrasive that I would apply - instead, I see this cotton full of stuff. Rubbed it and rubbed it and rubbed it, and when I wiped the liquid, the fender was all shiny! So much that I had to do the polishing on the front fender as well, even if it was not corroded.

    I'm not skilled at it and to be honest I don't care all that much about perfection here, but already the result is way better than what I was expecting (see photo). Thanks a lot!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Pierre; 10-16-2019 at 08:00 PM.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Srode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,481
    Quote Originally Posted by Pierre View Post
    That Nevr Dull product is AMAZING ! I used 400, 600 and 1500 sandpaper on the big damage (because that's what I had at home). Then a metal polish liquid from Home Depot called Basso.

    But really, the star of the show is that Nevr Dull. I was expecting wax-type abrasive that I would apply - instead, I see this cotton full of stuff. Rubbed it and rubbed it and rubbed it, and when I wiped the liquid, the fender was all shiny! So much that I had to do it on the front fender as well, even if it was not corroded. I'm not skilled at it and to be honest I don't care all that much about perfection here, but already the result is way better than what I was expecting (see photo). Thanks a lot!
    Oh Wow! That' really turned out nice!!
    Gravel Rocks

    Trek Domane
    Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike)
    BH G7 Disc
    Trek Crockett

  14. #14
    [REDACTED]
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,027
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Or leave as is.

    Beausage=honest wear from using the bike.
    Not to mention that thieves will leave it alone.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 07-08-2011, 07:59 PM
  2. What would cause rear derailleur adjustment everytime I remove the wheel?
    By roadbike_moron in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-22-2010, 03:56 PM
  3. Replies: 89
    Last Post: 08-28-2009, 06:03 AM
  4. Would you run this light? Would you ride here?
    By MB1 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: 05-05-2008, 07:07 AM
  5. Bush declines to say whether he would remove
    By MR_GRUMPY in forum Politics Only
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-21-2005, 10:09 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.