Hub spacing
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Thread: Hub spacing

  1. #1

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    Hub spacing

    I have an old touring bike that is a 15 speed. The rear hub measures 126mm and has a freehub (?) that spins on. It has 27" wheels. I would like to replace the wheels with 700c wheels with a 7 speed cassette. I know nothing about roadbike wheels. Am I looking for a 126mm or a 130mm roadbike wheel and will a 7 spd cassette off of a mountain bike wheel work on a road bike wheel. I have checked to see if the brakes on the touring bike will work with the 700c wheels and they will. Any ideas what I am looking for.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: edlouie's Avatar
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    I believe your current wheel has a freewheel, and you're looking for a new wheel with a freehub. If your frame is 126, you should try and get a 126 wheel, or (provided it's steel) you can spread the frame to 130. You minus well look into spreading to 130, since that would allow you to use 9 speed (which can be had for cheap now that 10 speed is out).

    Have a look at this site for more details:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/k7.html

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Be careful

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich M
    I have an old touring bike that is a 15 speed. The rear hub measures 126mm and has a freehub (?) that spins on. It has 27" wheels. I would like to replace the wheels with 700c wheels with a 7 speed cassette. I know nothing about roadbike wheels. Am I looking for a 126mm or a 130mm roadbike wheel and will a 7 spd cassette off of a mountain bike wheel work on a road bike wheel. I have checked to see if the brakes on the touring bike will work with the 700c wheels and they will. Any ideas what I am looking for.
    As edlouie said, you have a freewheel (not a freehub) and if the frame is steel it can easily be spread to fit the current 130 mm standard - you can often just force fit a wider wheel with no problems. However, you are embarking on a path that can involve significant $$ as you start thinking about upgrading derailleurs, new chain, shifters, and probably a crankset. Consider very carefully whether this bike is worth a several $100 investment. In most cases, "an old touring bike" is rarely good upgrade material.

  4. #4
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    Upgrade investments

    Kerry makes a good point. If all you want is to get 7 cogs in the back, you can probably get a 7-speed freewheel that will fit 126mm spacing. There are still lots of good 27-inch tires available, and there's no special advantage to 700c on a bike like this.

  5. #5
    Chili hed & old bike fixr
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    As edlouie said, you have a freewheel (not a freehub) and if the frame is steel it can easily be spread to fit the current 130 mm standard - you can often just force fit a wider wheel with no problems. However, you are embarking on a path that can involve significant $$ as you start thinking about upgrading derailleurs, new chain, shifters, and probably a crankset. Consider very carefully whether this bike is worth a several $100 investment. In most cases, "an old touring bike" is rarely good upgrade material.
    I know that you must have seen them, it might have slipped your memory. Shimano did make a 6 speed freehub on 126 mm spacing. Shame on anyone that might want to buy cogs. Just trying to add to your great knowledge base.

  6. #6
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    Freewheel vs. freehub

    Quote Originally Posted by curlybike
    I know that you must have seen them, it might have slipped your memory. Shimano did make a 6 speed freehub on 126 mm spacing. Shame on anyone that might want to buy cogs. Just trying to add to your great knowledge base.
    The OP said he "has a freehub (?) that spins on" which I took directly to mean a freewheel that threads on. If you can interpret this statement to be a splined freehub, please explain it to me.

  7. #7
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    "spins on" could mean a Malliard Heliometrec (sp?) cassette. (very-very small possibility)
    (early 80's Trek 620/720's came with these)
    .
    Changing from a 27" wheel to a 700c wheel isn't always possible.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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  8. #8

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    Thumbs up Here is what I did...

    I ended up going to Sheldon Brown's web site and reading the thread on cold setting the frame. I spent about one hour setting the (steel) frame to 135mm and it worked very well. I had an extra set of 700c wheels with a 135mm 7 spd cassette rear wheel. My goal was to do this job as inexpensively as possible and not put alot of money into this contraption. The down tube friction shifters worked very well with this set up. I replaced the chain with an old one I had in my parts drawer and it worked fine. So at this point I am not out any money and out a small amount of my time. Thanks to all of you who offered ideas on this project.

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