Impossibly tight tire mounting on Campy rims? Help!
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  1. #1
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    Impossibly tight tire mounting on Campy rims? Help!

    I have a pair of Campagnolo Omega Strada XL fixed wheels that I have been desparately trying to get a tire to stay on.

    As I don't have a huge budget, I've only tried what I have in my stash of tires... Conti GP 3000's barely went on then blew off thew wheel when inflated (floor pump). I've also tried an old Avocet and one other that I can't remember at the moment.

    Trying to outfit a new Fixie bike, so any suggestions to a tire that will fit these wheels would be greatly appreciated. Don't want to be buying ten different tires to get one that fits!

    Thanks...
    -Rob
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  2. #2
    ready for retirement
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    I have the same rims...

    ... on my fixed bike and they are the toughest for mounting tires I've encountered. My solution is the cheap Conti wire bead tires in 700x28. I think it's the Ultra 1000, costs around $15-20 in the lbs. These require some hand strength to mount, but they don't blow off. I wanted a fat, cushioned high mileage tire for the fixed bike and these work fine for me.

    I originally used some Michelin Carbon tires on these rims. They were even tougher to mount. That's not a big problem at home in the shop, but on a cold wet day I found that it can be a big problem with cold hands.

    Don't forget the soapy water on the bead trick , that may help when mounting a tight tire.

    Good luck!
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  3. #3
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    Thanks...

    Just seems strange that my Conti GP 3000 had big issues staying on. I only inflated it to 80 psi or thereabouts, and it just popped the seam and the tube came spilling out. For a tire being that tight to put on, that suprised me.

    I'll give them a try, and will definately avoid the Michelins.

    Also just scored a pair of the Strada rims on eBay pretty cheap a few minutes ago, so if you need a replacement, let me know. Only bought them on a whim to replace my rear rim (which wasn't too bad, but I'm picky).

    Later,
    -Rob

  4. #4
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    the reason your tire blew off

    Quote Originally Posted by rpatch
    Just seems strange that my Conti GP 3000 had big issues staying on. I only inflated it to 80 psi or thereabouts, and it just popped the seam and the tube came spilling out. For a tire being that tight to put on, that suprised me.

    I'll give them a try, and will definately avoid the Michelins.

    Also just scored a pair of the Strada rims on eBay pretty cheap a few minutes ago, so if you need a replacement, let me know. Only bought them on a whim to replace my rear rim (which wasn't too bad, but I'm picky).

    Later,
    -Rob
    is that you had the tube pinched between the rim and the tire when you inflated it. this is most likely to happen when you have a really tight rim/tire combination. you need to pull the tire away from the rim all the way around and look to make sure the tube is all the way inside the tire. if it isn't, you can usually get it in there by rolling the tire between your thumb and fingers. resist the temptation to poke at it w/ a tire lever.

    also, try schwalbe tires. they seem to go on the newer campy rims (which are still slightly big) pretty easily...

  5. #5
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    try Veloflex

    I had big problems with my Nucleon rims -- Michelins were impossible. Veloflex tires fit ok, though (and never blew off).

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpatch
    I have a pair of Campagnolo Omega Strada XL fixed wheels that I have been desparately trying to get a tire to stay on....
    Conti tires are a PAIN IN THE (_!_) to mount on any rim. My wife runs them on here 650 mavic rims, and I'm forever pincheing tubes trying to mount them.

  7. #7
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    Hmmmm

    Quote Originally Posted by ottodog
    Conti tires are a PAIN IN THE (_!_) to mount on any rim.
    Most people would say that Michelins are hard to mount, but that Contis (and others) are easier. Campy rims tend to be harder to mount.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    Most people would say that Michelins are hard to mount, but that Contis (and others) are easier. Campy rims tend to be harder to mount.
    I've never tried mounting michelins, and if they're worse than the contis i've mounted i'm going to have to keep it that way. I went through 5 tubes before giving up on a set of Continental Ultra sports. 2 LBS's gave up too.
    I had luck mounting hutchinsons on that set of rims. too bad those tires really suck.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    Most people would say that Michelins are hard to mount, but that Contis (and others) are easier..
    I don't know, I run Michelin Pro Races' on my tandem, and have never had a problem...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    Most people would say that Michelins are hard to mount, but that Contis (and others) are easier. Campy rims tend to be harder to mount.
    Agree. Agree and agree.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ottodog
    I don't know, I run Michelin Pro Races' on my tandem, and have never had a problem...
    I use Michelin Carbons, and they slip right onto Mavic rims and Bontragers....at least in my experience. As for Conti's....I never had any problem mounting them, but I only ran them on a set of Wolber rims.

    I have less fuzzy feelings about the Vittoria's that have refused to mount on my wife's rims w/out toasting a tube.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons
    Most people would say that Michelins are hard to mount, but that Contis (and others) are easier. Campy rims tend to be harder to mount.
    you probably mean that Michelins are hard to mount to Campy rims. I haven't tried Michelins, but my GP3000s were quite hard (but not impossible) to get onto my Eurus rims. I actually had to use a tire lever to mount them the first time round.

  13. #13
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    Try different tires..

    I had an extremely difficult time mounting Panaracer tires to Mavic O.P. rims. it must have taken 20 minutes per tire. I put the Panaracers on my old bike that had Rolf wheels and had no problems. They turned out to be excellent wearing tires. I've never had problems with Conti tires, Michelins are hard to mount. One tire I used that was very easy to mount and pull off and on were Vittoria Open Corsa EVO's, especially after they get a couple of miles on them. I've read other posts about Campy rims, so it must be a tire/rim problem.

  14. #14
    Arrogant roadie.....
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    Avoid Conti SPORT 1000's!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by stratoshark
    ... on my fixed bike and they are the toughest for mounting tires I've encountered. My solution is the cheap Conti wire bead tires in 700x28. I think it's the Ultra 1000, costs around $15-20 in the lbs. These require some hand strength to mount, but they don't blow off. I wanted a fat, cushioned high mileage tire for the fixed bike and these work fine for me. ..............
    The tire he is referring to is the ancient Conti Sport 1000, a tire which first saw the light of day some 35 years ago. They may've been good for that time, but they are quite substandard for today.

    Not only doe these things wear down incredibly fast, but they puncture on even the smallest piece of glass. Unless you want to be fixing punctures every other ride, stay away from Conti Sport 1k's!
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by baxter
    I've never tried mounting michelins, and if they're worse than the contis i've mounted i'm going to have to keep it that way. I went through 5 tubes before giving up on a set of Continental Ultra sports. 2 LBS's gave up too.
    I had luck mounting hutchinsons on that set of rims. too bad those tires really suck.
    no problem with ultra 2000 on open pros; but they are 700c rims...

  16. #16
    Quit upgrading & ride!
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    I thought you guys were on crack until................

    I got my first puncture in 18 months, on Campag protons shod with Conti Attack & Force tyres.

    I broke 2 tyre levers, I bent my front door key, I made my thumbs bleed, and still didn't get the f*ckin tyre OFF!!!!

    So I rode 13 miles home on the rim. Quite funny passing a guy on a sit up & beg bike, "you got a problem there mate?" tell me about it ;)

    Good news, the rim is as true as ever, now what tyre shall I replace the Conti with?
    Put me back on my bike

  17. #17
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    really?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Stohler

    Not only doe these things wear down incredibly fast, but they puncture on even the smallest piece of glass. Unless you want to be fixing punctures every other ride, stay away from Conti Sport 1k's!
    I bought 8 of these for $30 - sure they're cheap but they run a lot better than I expected and don't seem to be wearing any faster than my vittoria's and Im on my second set and Ive yet to flat.

    Mine were fresh from a local distributor that was closing shop (hence the price) and my guess is that perhaps you may have had some old rubber - like brake hoods and brake blocks, tires that are old are not good. mine are all black with an orange logo and if I knew what they would have been like i would have bought 30 of them. fine for riding - not great, but good enough and certainly better than I expected.

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  18. #18
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    Crank Bros. Speed Lever is the tool

    Quote Originally Posted by rpatch
    I have a pair of Campagnolo Omega Strada XL fixed wheels that I have been desparately trying to get a tire to stay on.

    As I don't have a huge budget, I've only tried what I have in my stash of tires... Conti GP 3000's barely went on then blew off thew wheel when inflated (floor pump). I've also tried an old Avocet and one other that I can't remember at the moment.
    Have you tried the $6 Crank Brothers Speed lever? It removes AND installs tires without any pinching or problems. Probably the most convenient method I have ever found and is small enough for a seat wedge. Has not failed me yet and NEVER pinches a tube if used properly.

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...e.cfm?SKU=2058

    Of course, if you're a "man's man" and refuse to use a very useful tool such as this one, well, you can keep pinchin' those tubes and bangin' those knuckles...

  19. #19
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    What concerns me -

    Quote Originally Posted by rpatch
    I have a pair of Campagnolo Omega Strada XL fixed wheels that I have been desparately trying to get a tire to stay on.

    As I don't have a huge budget, I've only tried what I have in my stash of tires... Conti GP 3000's barely went on then blew off thew wheel when inflated (floor pump). I've also tried an old Avocet and one other that I can't remember at the moment.

    Trying to outfit a new Fixie bike, so any suggestions to a tire that will fit these wheels would be greatly appreciated. Don't want to be buying ten different tires to get one that fits!

    Thanks...
    -Rob

    is that the tire blew off the rim. Oversized rims are designed to prevent this so the tire doesn't roll off even if ridden flat. Or so I hear.

  20. #20
    Overequipped, underlegged
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    second that, i run pro-races on my K elites, and they mount pretty smooth. Obviously not to the point of not requiring a tire lever, but they have never made me struggle
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  21. #21
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    Some confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by hairscrambled
    Oversized rims are designed to prevent this so the tire doesn't roll off even if ridden flat. Or so I hear.
    The tire blew off the rim (not really, the tube blew out under the tire) because after all that struggle, the tube was pinched under the tire bead. When you inflated the tire, the tube bubbled up under the tire bead and that's where the blowout happened. A rim that makes for hard tire mounting has a higher (farther away from the hub) spoke bed - it is not an "oversized rim." The incentive to build a rim like this is that it makes the box section as large as possible and the rim sidewall as short as possible. The combination of these factors result in a stronger or lighter rim. The tire is held on the rim by the engagement of the bead and the hooked side wall of the rim, not by the diameter of the rim.

  22. #22
    Bling Bling Master!
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    A good tire for campy

    I like the Michelin Pro Race tires but they fit too tight .
    I have found that the hutchinson tires(carbon comps), thought they wear fast are easier to mount on the campy rims. The first generation of this tire wore out super fast and cut up very easy. The newer ones that they are making are a little tougher. Any others?

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