Internal routing
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  1. #1
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    Internal routing

    Wow! Just replaced my first set of cables on a bike with internal cable routing. Who the HELL ever thought THAT was a good idea??! Maybe invented by a mechanic who got paid by the hour?! Nothing like turning an 1.5 hour job into one taking 4 hours! It'd better be saving me several *pounds* of drag to justify that much time and hassle.

  2. #2
    Rub it............
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    Not that hard IME. Last week I installed 2 sets of these shifters in less than 1.5 hours.

    Even my first set I ever installed only took 45 minutes.

    This is coming from a mechanic who gets paid by the hour. Just have to follow the instructions. They are pretty well written out.
    You can't fix stupid.

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  3. #3
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    First step....Figure out if there are cable guides, or if the housing goes straight through....

    You need to make sure there is a path for the new cable to follow...

    If not and you are dealing with an open cavity then thread and a shop vac are your friend

    Been there, done that...

  4. #4
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    good one

    creative solution...i like it

    Quote Originally Posted by rbart4506 View Post
    First step....Figure out if there are cable guides, or if the housing goes straight through....

    You need to make sure there is a path for the new cable to follow...

    If not and you are dealing with an open cavity then thread and a shop vac are your friend

    Been there, done that...
    i've got limited minutes left in life, don't waste my time

  5. #5
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    better idea is to use the old cables as guides - cut them before hole opening to main downtube internal section, tape new cable ending to old cable, pull the cable through gently.

  6. #6
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    ^ This- replacing brake cable in the top tube seems faster than with external cables.

  7. #7
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    I'm especially fond of the new paths rain/moisture/sweat have for getting inside your expensive frame that internal cable routing provides.

  8. #8
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    I straighten out a wire coathanger so that it's long enough to go through the frame, tape the cable to one end, and then just stick the coathanger through and pull it out the other side.
    Don't take anything I say seriously.

  9. #9
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Wow! Just replaced my first set of cables on a bike with internal cable routing. Who the HELL ever thought THAT was a good idea??! Maybe invented by a mechanic who got paid by the hour?! Nothing like turning an 1.5 hour job into one taking 4 hours! It'd better be saving me several *pounds* of drag to justify that much time and hassle.
    1.5hr to install cables on ONE bike? really...that long?
    #promechaniclife

  10. #10
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    Nope, no internal cable guides and yep, did a lot of fishing. Suggestions work OK for down tube but still a fair amount of fishing to get the cable through the chain stay plus through the fiddly short tubes attached to the fittings plus taking the fittings on/off is a pain- cable stops are way better IMHO.

    If there are "instructions" out there for how to do it better, I'd be forever indebted for a link to or post of them.

    I was referring to the entire job I.e. Un-tape, pull cables, thread cables, adjust cables, re-tape with my 1.5 hr estimate. Could probably do it faster if I had to. I've built MANY "old-school" bikes from the frame up and am an engineer by profession so I know my way around a bike and a wrench.

  11. #11
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    Bikes with internal cable routing should have cable guides, plain and simple. For a manufacturer or builder to leave them out shows some serious flaws in their design and thought process.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwhite_4 View Post
    Bikes with internal cable routing should have cable guides, plain and simple. For a manufacturer or builder to leave them out shows some serious flaws in their design and thought process.
    some brands do, others dont.

    felt does, which is definitely nice.

    i recently re-housed an older trek or specialized tt/tri bike that didn't. we managed to get the shifter housings twisted inside of the downtube. not fun. resorted to vacuum/string.
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  13. #13
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    Yep, it's a Specialized Roubaix. I'd be *really* pissed if it was a $5k -$7k frame and it didn't have guides. Guess that's what I get for "only" spending about $4 grand on a bike!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Yep, it's a Specialized Roubaix. I'd be *really* pissed if it was a $5k -$7k frame and it didn't have guides. Guess that's what I get for "only" spending about $4 grand on a bike!
    some of the mid/upper colnagos are going all internal as they're coming with a Di2 spec. as someone who works at a colnago shop, i'm a little worried to see what their plan of attack is....that and I want a CX-1, which is definitely internal.

    oh and oldchipper- did you have to deal with the 4mm housing issue on the specialized? the tri bike we worked on required 4mm housing which sucked, especially because the owner wanted red housing, which he gave us...but it was 5mm.
    Last edited by 2cflyr; 08-03-2011 at 03:56 PM.
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  15. #15
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    It's not that bad... all you need are some picks, a headlamp, and a lot of patience.
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  16. #16
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2cflyr View Post
    some of the mid/upper colnagos are going all internal as they're coming with a Di2 spec. as someone who works at a colnago shop, i'm a little worried to see what their plan of attack is....that and I want a CX-1, which is definitely internal.

    oh and oldchipper- did you have to deal with the 4mm housing issue on the specialized? the tri bike we worked on required 4mm housing which sucked, especially because the owner wanted red housing, which he gave us...but it was 5mm.
    5mm shift housing? that's still around? just make him buy some that is the 'industry standard' and he's all set.
    #promechaniclife

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2cflyr View Post

    oh and oldchipper- did you have to deal with the 4mm housing issue on the specialized? the tri bike we worked on required 4mm housing which sucked, especially because the owner wanted red housing, which he gave us...but it was 5mm.
    Nope, I was installing the Yokozuna Reaction cables/housing and they worked. The brake housing was a bit snug, but once I filed down the ends a bit they slipped in OK. Shift housing was perfect.

  18. #18
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    In my experience, there's good internal, bad, and really bad. I worked on a Specialized recently that was great. And I've warrantied 2009 Cervelos for hideous cable routing problems causing poor shifting. The current Cervelos are much better, but are often tedious.
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  19. #19
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    Wow. Sounds like lots of folks are doing it the hard way. For frames without internal cable tubing, get a few lengths of housing liner (http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...ing+Liner.aspx). Before removing old cables from frame, slide a length of housing liner onto cable from the derailleur end or brake end. Feed liner all the way through the section of frame, then remove that section of old cable leaving the liner in place. Repeat as necessary such that all the sections of internally routed cables have been replaced by housing liner. Next, replace cables and housing, sliding the cables through the housing liner, then removing each section of housing liner once the cables are all the way through that section. Save the housing liner for the next time you replace cables. Easy.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rs3o View Post
    Wow. Sounds like lots of folks are doing it the hard way. For frames without internal cable tubing, get a few lengths of housing liner (http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...ing+Liner.aspx). Before removing old cables from frame, slide a length of housing liner onto cable from the derailleur end or brake end. Feed liner all the way through the section of frame, then remove that section of old cable leaving the liner in place. Repeat as necessary such that all the sections of internally routed cables have been replaced by housing liner. Next, replace cables and housing, sliding the cables through the housing liner, then removing each section of housing liner once the cables are all the way through that section. Save the housing liner for the next time you replace cables. Easy.
    Now THAT 'S what I'm talking about! Great tip! Can't believe I didn't think of that. Thanks!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by rs3o View Post
    Wow. Sounds like lots of folks are doing it the hard way. For frames without internal cable tubing, get a few lengths of housing liner (http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...ing+Liner.aspx). Before removing old cables from frame, slide a length of housing liner onto cable from the derailleur end or brake end. Feed liner all the way through the section of frame, then remove that section of old cable leaving the liner in place. Repeat as necessary such that all the sections of internally routed cables have been replaced by housing liner. Next, replace cables and housing, sliding the cables through the housing liner, then removing each section of housing liner once the cables are all the way through that section. Save the housing liner for the next time you replace cables. Easy.
    That'll fix everything!

    Oh, wait. I'm building new bikes that don't already have cables in them.


    Personally, my favorite idea is the vacuum one, but they all will get you out of a jam. However, really well designed internal cabling doesn't require any technique - you stick the cables in and they come out of the right holes.
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  22. #22
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    and that is why I will always have bikes with external cable routing. And I will go to hell and back to get a TT bike with external routing... If I ever wanted a TT bike
    Last edited by thebikingcello; 08-04-2011 at 07:15 PM.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kontact View Post
    however, really well designed internal cabling doesn't require any technique - you stick the cables in and they come out of the right holes.
    +1(000)

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