Keep cutting tires ???
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  1. #1
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    Keep cutting tires ???

    Just wondering if anybody has any suggestions for this problem......

    No matter what tires I run I keep getting cut s in them and thus flats and tires are expensive so I am hoping its' something I'm doing and can change.... The most recent one is in my conti 4000 its' about a half inch accross the tread thruough to the carcass, however not far enough to cause a flat.. I'm just waiting for that to happen.... had similar cuts appearing on all my other tires over the last 2 years, and seem to average about 500 miles a tire...... Should I get foam filled tires like they use on loaders in scrap yards ?? lol... Any ideas

    Thanks
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  2. #2
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    The first answer is as obvious as it is hard - stop running over sharp stuff.

    The second is to consider your pressures - tires run at 120psi are far more prone to cuts, along with all of the other reasons not to use that much pressure.

    Lastly, cheaper tires are often more durable than race tires. If it's a concern for you, Gatorskins or Armadillos might be a better choice for everyday tires. Save the 'race' tires for race day.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  3. #3
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    I was told that running the higher pressures would make the tires not only handle better but last longer ? and protect the rims from damage from hitting rocks and pot holes... You know maybe I just need to move somewhere cleaner ?? I gotta go get a tire tonight, so I'll look and see if they have those gatorskins and give those a shot..or armadillos, see what they have... Thanks
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  4. #4
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    Just did some research on the contis, and the gp 4000 has the vectran blah blah puncture resistance stuff and the gator skin has some reinforcement layer of some mesh stuff....but both said reccomended tp is 110 psi,,, Ive been running 120 psi that it said on the side wall... So maybe dropping it down 10 psi would help as well.....
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  5. #5
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    Thumbs up +1 - Cheeper, heavier, wider

    I agree that race tires are for races and other "special occasions". For every day use, IMHO, it is better to go cheaper, wider and heavier.

    Personally, I am running Vittoria Zafferios on my everyday bike. They are working out great. They were so cheep, I almost did buy them under the too-good-to-be-true rule. Yeah, they are heavy, but boy are they durable.
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  6. #6
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    I feel your pain. I just trashed a Fortezza Tri-Comp with 30 miles on it due to a slash in the sidewall. I second the switch to Vittoria; they have some remarkable low cost tires with decent puncture resistance. Wiggle currently has Rubino and Rubino Tech for less than $14.

  7. #7
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    Tell us more

    Quote Originally Posted by mudphalt
    I was told that running the higher pressures would make the tires not only handle better but last longer ? and protect the rims from damage from hitting rocks and pot holes...
    What size tires are you running; how much do you weigh; what pressure have you been running; what are the road conditions like; do you do lots of group rides, or mostly ride solo; do you try to avoid obstacles and debris?

    You were seriously misled by somebody about the effect of higher pressures. The only advantage of higher pressures in normal riding is decreasing the likelihood of pinch flats, and for that you only want just high enough -- not as high as possible. You may have been running much higher pressures than is advisable.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudphalt
    Just did some research on the contis, and the gp 4000 has the vectran blah blah puncture resistance stuff and the gator skin has some reinforcement layer of some mesh stuff....but both said reccomended tp is 110 psi,,, Ive been running 120 psi that it said on the side wall... So maybe dropping it down 10 psi would help as well.....
    am i the only person that runs road tires at 100psi or less?
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomk96
    am i the only person that runs road tires at 100psi or less?
    Nope. At 180lbs, I usually run 25's at a light 100 on the rear, 85ish on the front. Usta do it with 23's, too, but that was just a little too much squish for that size.


    Mudphalt: You were given one of those bits of 'everyone knows' that happens to not be true. Take a gander here:


    http://www.vintagebicyclepress.com/images/TireDrop.pdf
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  10. #10
    n00bsauce
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomk96
    am i the only person that runs road tires at 100psi or less?
    Nope, depending on which bike I'm riding and thus what size tire, I run 100psi on my 23c tires and 90-95 on my 25c tires. I also don't check my pressure every ride so by the time I check and pump the 23c tires are down around 95psi and the 25c are probably below 90psi.

    I'm 165 and the roads I ride are pretty clean but some have a fairly poor road surface. The last time I got a pinch flat was several years ago. I was fourth or fifth in a pace line and the kind folks ahead gave no warning of a pothole about 6" deep and a 10" around. I hit it square on at 25. I think a tire at 120psi would have gotten a pinch flat from that one.
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  11. #11
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    Optimum tire pressure is related to both your weight and the cross section of the tires. As a rule for a given weight rider, the optimum pressure will be lower with wider section tires. For the same tire, heavier riders require higher pressures than lighter riders.

    I'm not sure that changing tires or pressures will lead to fewer cuts, though less expensive tires will be less heartbreaking when they do get cut.

    The only real solution is to be a bit more vigilent on your rides, and try to steer around glass. It also pays to ride not so far to the right. Car tires tend to sweep the road, moving glass and stuff towards the shoulders, so moving left a bit will put you on cleaner pavement.

    Lastly if your tires have a bit thicker tread, carry an old credit card, and use it to scrape both tires after a glass field. Often tires pick up glass, which embeds into the tread and works it's way in later on. Scraping the tires flicks these small shards out before they cause leaks.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by danl1
    Mudphalt: You were given one of those bits of 'everyone knows' that happens to not be true. Take a gander here:

    http:
    //www.vintagebicyclepress.com/images/TireDrop.pdf
    Those guys are always doing some objective, interesting testing. They are the MythBusters of the bike world...

  13. #13
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    I'm running 700x23 tires with 120 psi front and rear. I weight about 170 lbs.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudphalt
    I'm running 700x23 tires with 120 psi front and rear. I weight about 170 lbs.
    Based on Frank's research, that puts you in the range of 110rear, 90front. Give that a try and tell us what you think.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudphalt
    I'm running 700x23 tires with 120 psi front and rear. I weight about 170 lbs.
    I weigh 185+ (varies) and ride 23mm tubulars at about 95psi front, 110psi rear. I've been riding similar section tires at these pressures for over 30 years. I find going any higher makes the bike too skittish, especially on high speed descents. I can't say what's right for you, but consider dropping pressure a bit and see how it works.

    The tire drop measurement system makes sense but it's too complicated. I've simply gotten used to eyeballing the tire bulge when seen from the saddle.

    BTW- tires aren't rocket science, and while charts might be a good guide, you also need to accept that not all 23mm tires actually measure 23mm and take any precise data with a few grains of salt. Experiment within a range and settle on the pressures that seem to offer the best balance of low rolling resistance and good handling.
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  16. #16
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    My slashing days slowed way down with prescription glasses, and possibly further with lower tire pressure. I ride with @ 105lbs rear 100 front, but for comfort rather than flat protection. I'm not completely sure I buy that 100 psi is much less slash resistant than 120psi. Both are pretty hard to the touch.
    I have not had a pinch flat in years with proper tire pressure.

    The longer tire wear has paid for the prescription Rudy Project glasses by now, I'm sure!

    I did get slashed up Schwalbe R's last summer, but never did they flat, before I discovered the tube poking out the sidewall. Thank, you know who, that didn't blow out on the road.

  17. #17
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    I only use Vittoria, cause they are the only tires ive never had a puncture off!.

    Then again, im pretty good to look way ahead to see sharp objects etc. to minimize the risk of getting a puncture.

    My Vittoria Zaffiro is 5years old, lots of cuts but no puncture. They are also 25 wide, but works great.

    I also have a set with Vittoria Rubino, awesome tires if you look at price, and no puncture there aswell. They are 4 years old. Lots of cuts in them, since ive used them in the city where you usually find lots of broken glass etc, but never a puncture!.
    Awesome tires.

    I also bought a pair of Rubino Pro's for my last wheelset, and not a puncture yet, and they are very fast compared to the rubino, and zaffiro, but i havent ridden them so long yet compared to the other wheels.

    I have 116 in the zaffiro and rubino, and 130 in the Rubino Pro's.
    I wheigh 165pounds.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudphalt
    Just wondering if anybody has any suggestions for this problem......

    No matter what tires I run I keep getting cut s in them and thus flats and tires are expensive so I am hoping its' something I'm doing and can change.... The most recent one is in my conti 4000 its' about a half inch accross the tread thruough to the carcass, however not far enough to cause a flat.. I'm just waiting for that to happen.... had similar cuts appearing on all my other tires over the last 2 years, and seem to average about 500 miles a tire...... Should I get foam filled tires like they use on loaders in scrap yards ?? lol... Any ideas

    Thanks
    Yes, like others have said. Watch the road. Get into the habit of staying out of the gutter and veering away from glass. I have been riding for twenty years and never had a 1/2" slice in any of my tires.

  19. #19
    n00bsauce
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    Quote Originally Posted by danl1
    Nope. At 180lbs, I usually run 25's at a light 100 on the rear, 85ish on the front. Usta do it with 23's, too, but that was just a little too much squish for that size.


    Mudphalt: You were given one of those bits of 'everyone knows' that happens to not be true. Take a gander here:


    http://www.vintagebicyclepress.com/images/TireDrop.pdf
    Not sure I totally buy into that chart. I haven't actually determined my weight distribution or actual riding weight but using the distribution approximation they give and estimating my riding weight I should be running my 23mm front tire @ 75psi. I know I would get pinch flats at that psi.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire

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  20. #20
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    23 mm tires, 150 pound rider...95 psi front, 105 rear...rides good with very few flats..I also try to avoid glass and other debris in the road but of course sometimes you can't.

  21. #21
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    I had two Continental Grand Prix 4000 S (the one that's all black with "black chili" - which is actually very finely powdered carbon (charcoal). These are only available as 700 X 23C. I decided to experiment and hunted down a Conti Grand Prix 4000 - in blue and black in 700 X 25C format. I put 95psi in the 25mm. in the rear. And 105psi in the front Grand Prix 4000 S in the 23mm size.

    This gives me a very smooth ride, but still fast as all get-out and extremely nimble. If you haven't mixed sizes like this - give it a try. It's much nicer and less jarring than both in 700 X 23C. It's a win-win combination. I used to do similar about 12 or so years back. Only the 25mm was the narrowest common tire back then - so I rode a 28mm rear and 25mm front.

    I haven't had a flat in years. But I finally got one to play with. I had just bought the new Park Tool GP-2 Super Patch self-adhesive patches. They really do work very well. Just clean off the area around the puncture. Scrape lightly with the supplied sandpaper square. Peel off backing from patch. There are 6 of 'em. Press on to tube. Pump up and go. That quick. The entire patch-kit measures 1 1/4" by 1 1/4" by 1/4".

  22. #22
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    Thanks ... I've got 110 in the rear now with my new gatorskin, and dropping the front 4000 to 95 and see how it feels... Unfortunatly it's not just a matter of riding in the gutter I usually stay about 4 feet away from the curb and ride in the middle when possible for visibility reasons, but there are pot holes and junk everywhere here.. I would need a street sweeper attachment on the front of my bike to avoid everything.... Thanks
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  23. #23
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Puchnuts
    I had two Continental Grand Prix 4000 S (the one that's all black with "black chili" - which is actually very finely powdered carbon (charcoal). These are only available as 700 X 23C. I decided to experiment and hunted down a Conti Grand Prix 4000 - in blue and black in 700 X 25C format. I put 95psi in the 25mm. in the rear. And 105psi in the front Grand Prix 4000 S in the 23mm size.

    This gives me a very smooth ride, but still fast as all get-out and extremely nimble. If you haven't mixed sizes like this - give it a try. It's much nicer and less jarring than both in 700 X 23C. It's a win-win combination. I used to do similar about 12 or so years back. Only the 25mm was the narrowest common tire back then - so I rode a 28mm rear and 25mm front.

    I haven't had a flat in years. But I finally got one to play with. I had just bought the new Park Tool GP-2 Super Patch self-adhesive patches. They really do work very well. Just clean off the area around the puncture. Scrape lightly with the supplied sandpaper square. Peel off backing from patch. There are 6 of 'em. Press on to tube. Pump up and go. That quick. The entire patch-kit measures 1 1/4" by 1 1/4" by 1/4".
    Puchnuts, you should start a new post or poll on using different size tires. I am using a 25 in the back and 23 up front. And have no problem. I usually ride my tires @ 120psi in the back and 110 up front. I think in a way it looks cool too.

  24. #24
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    Talking nope

    Quote Originally Posted by tomk96
    am i the only person that runs road tires at 100psi or less?

    I run 100psi in the rear and 90 in the front, currently running pro race 3's. Its funny cause alot of guys tell me I need to pump my tires up and that if there not at 120 or 130 they wont corner as good or roll as fast. Funny thing, they have more tire issues, (I have had 1 flat in the last 3 years) and dont seem to ever be as fast as i am (LOL)!!

  25. #25
    Matnlely Dregaend
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    I think the tire pressure / flats argument is a matter of conjecture... and mostly flats are due to the poor road conditions in a particular place, or just plain bad luck. I have just as many flats running my tires at 95 psi as I do running them at 125 (maybe 2-3 a year)... But boy it sure feels a lot more comfortable at 95!

    Usually the best indicator for me is the age of a tire... when it has 4000 miles on it and the sidewalls are fraying, it won't go flat for another 1000 miles... If it's a brand new tire, I'm bound to immediately run over a spill created be the local glass recycler and wind up with an unrepairable gash.

    One thing I will say is that New Jersey has been very busy lately paving roads (stimulus money?) and it is now a pleasure to ride around here without giant tire busting potholes in the way.
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