Let's talk about - ting! ting! ting! ting! - rotor rubbing and clearances
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  1. #1
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    Let's talk about - ting! ting! ting! ting! - rotor rubbing and clearances

    I have Ultegra 8000 with RT-800 Ice Tech rotors (silver plates).

    My rotors have this annoying thing where they start to rub after heavier uses. If I need to come to a stop after a hill, I will get the dreaded ting! ting! ting! ting! pinging every revolution for some time after. I will also get rubbing while out of the seat and climbing, but I feel that's understandable.

    The rotors don't have a lip and are newish. A while I haven't been able to center them between the calipers, it seems they are riding less than a balls hair to the inner pad, they do not appear warped. I make this determination based on the fact that if I shine a light through the caliper and spin slowly there's no wobbling.

    In a fit of disgust I decided to swap out my rotors. I bought a digital caliper, a larger torque wrench and Dura Ace rotors. $250 later and with the stuff still on the truck here, I'm asking myself if this will really accomplish anything other then matching the rotor color to my nice matte black bike.

    I am getting more rubbing because of heat expansion, correct?

    Is there anyway to increase the gap between rotor and pads to decrease the chance of rubbing when they are really hot? Brakes are Ultegra hydraulic.

    Is there anyway to center the rotors in the caliper? I should note that I have undone the calipers, squeezed the lever and re tightened. I did this many times, it does have an effect on cold rotor rubbing issues but then ting ting ting! right back when I'm out there.

    Is this something that just happens and people live with?

    I live in a fairly hilly area, or at least my rides are hilly at about 700-1000 feet per 10 miles. I don't usually if ever, but am conscious about not riding my brakes so it just doesn't happen. Mostly because I have child like fingers and can barely reach the levers without pushing them off to the side.

    Should I return the rotors? What's the game plan here?

    Rotors are 160mm
    Last edited by 9W9W; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:41 AM.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  2. #2
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    My rotors have this annoying thing where they start to rub after heavier uses. If I need to come to a stop after a hill, I will get the dreaded ting! ting! ting! ting! pinging every revolution for some time after. I will also get rubbing while out of the seat and climbing, but I feel that's understandable.
    Do you have QR wheels or thru axles? Make sure your skewers are tight. QR's are more prone to getting rocking in the dropouts.

    The rotors don't have a lip and are newish. A while I haven't been able to center them between the calipers, it seems they are riding less than a balls hair to the inner pad, they do not appear warped. I make this determination based on the fact that if I shine a light through the caliper and spin slowly there's no wobbling.

    I am getting more rubbing because of heat expansion, correct?
    No I don't think so.


    Is there anyway to increase the gap between rotor and pads to decrease the chance of rubbing when they are really hot? Brakes are Ultegra hydraulic.
    No, they are self adjusting.

    Is there anyway to center the rotors in the caliper? I should note that I have undone the calipers, squeezed the lever and re tightened. I did this many times, it does have an effect on cold rotor rubbing issues but then ting ting ting! right back when I'm out there.
    No matter how many times you try and squeeze the lever and re-tighten, they always seem to be a C##t hair to one side afterwards.
    Here's a trick, use a shim between the pad and rotor opposite the side it's off. A business card, thick paper, metal shim, etc. Then squeeze and tighten.
    So if it's off 0.5mm left, and you shim it 0.5mm to the right when you tighten it, it'll be centered when done. This works every time for me.

    Ting ting tinging is a sign of a bent rotor. You probably need to true them. Even new rotors can need truing.
    Slamming your brakes on really hard can cause very slight bends to your rotor, enough to go ting ting ting.

    Also make sure your pistons are clean. If they get crud on them, they wont retract fully, or they'll retract unevenly, causing your rotor to be uncentered.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  3. #3
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    Thruaxle wheels.

    The pinging happens only when the rotor is warmer than usual cruise temperature.

    I did read about the shims, but came here to gather other opinions.

    Looks like i have to block off some time, watch a few videos crack open a beer and do a complete brake service.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

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    with hydraulic disc, meaning pads are floating (self-centered), shims ain't gonna work. If you shim the caliper, i'll make it worse. Back in the say, shimming would work because brake system was cable actuated and pads weren't floating (ie, not self-centering). But these full hydro disc system, shimming ain't gonna do you much. The whole idea of floating pads is that you could just loosen the caliper up, squeeze the brake lever, then tighten down the calipers, and the pads would be centered about the disc (and you did this already). if you shim, then you would still need to go thru the process of re-centering the pads again, which will take you back to square one which is the same as not using shims. Did I make sense?

    Solution? Live with it. Tinging is normal with hydro disc. Anyone who has ridden mtb will attest to this tinging at some point in their venture. The reason is tolerance of the brake system. Rotor, pads, and cylinders are just not in complete tolerance, so you'll get the tinging sound. Manufacturing tolerance for all system compoments is not as tight as it could be (probably due to cost saving).

    But the good news is other than the annoying noise, there is absolutely nothing wrong. Don't even worry about any friction. Just continue riding.

  5. #5
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    I find the 'grab the lever and tighten the caliper bolts' works about 10% of the time. The other 90% I have to do it visually. Lots of bikes...LOTS need the caliper mounts faced so they're truly perpendicular to the rotor. As tlg posted you need to make sure your pistons are clean and both are seeing the same amount of movement and actually return when you release the lever.
    #promechaniclife

  6. #6
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    Like CX, I rarely find the 'squeeze the lever, tighten the bolts' method works.
    In addition to the above good recommendations, I now find it much easier to look at rotor deflection with the brakes applied as you work them on a stand and having a white sheet of paper on the floor so you can see the gap between the rotor and the pads a little easier. Sometimes the gap on one side is just a hair more than the other but you're looking for the rotor to not deflect when the levers are squeezed.
    It could take a few minute adjustments but stick with it. Good luck.
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    The easier solution is to find a biker bar in Spartanburg the night before, go in and pick a fight. The ass-whipping you'll get will be far less painful than the one Mitchell will give you the next day!

  7. #7
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    Like CX, I rarely find the 'squeeze the lever, tighten the bolts' method works.
    In addition to the above good recommendations, I now find it much easier to look at rotor deflection with the brakes applied as you work them on a stand and having a white sheet of paper on the floor so you can see the gap between the rotor and the pads a little easier. Sometimes the gap on one side is just a hair more than the other but you're looking for the rotor to not deflect when the levers are squeezed.
    It could take a few minute adjustments but stick with it. Good luck.
    ^This^
    #promechaniclife

  8. #8
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    Thanks for taking the time out to reply everyone.

    It sounds like I should service the caliper first and give that a shot before putting on new rotors.

    CX, thanks for the tip about squeeze and re-tighten not being 100% effective and SC for the deflection ttip
    Last edited by 9W9W; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:52 PM.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  9. #9
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    I also use the sheet of paper with a light shining on it to visually inspect the rotor. I make sure it's true first, then, if it's not aligned, will adjust the caliper to that it's parallel to the rotor, before a final 'centering'.

    One thing that you want to check on the caliper is that the pistons are moving in and out freely. When they get hot, they can get sticky and not retract all the way. I believe this is the primary cause of most "ting ting ting when it's hot" scenarios.

  10. #10
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    with hydraulic disc, meaning pads are floating (self-centered), shims ain't gonna work. If you shim the caliper, i'll make it worse. Back in the say, shimming would work because brake system was cable actuated and pads weren't floating (ie, not self-centering). But these full hydro disc system, shimming ain't gonna do you much.
    Yes it does. It works every time.
    If it's off 0.5mm left, and you shim it 0.5mm to the right when you tighten it, it'll be centered when done. You're not leaving the shim in, you're shifting it over while tightening it. There's no 're-centering' afterwards.


    Solution? Live with it. Tinging is normal with hydro disc.
    Not me. My discs don't ting. Road or MTB.
    It's very simple to solve.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Not me. My discs don't ting.
    Same here.

    I agree you have a bent rotor. If you look around product reviews, there are quite a few complaints about higher end rotors being warped right out of the box due to the larger part of the center that is aluminum.
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  12. #12
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    I find that when I'm tightening the caliper bolts, the caliper moves. I now hold the end of the caliper having the bolt I'm tightening to keep it from moving. I also have a Hayes Feel'r Gage that I use.

  13. #13
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    Yeah, but boy... that modulation... totally worth it right?
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  14. #14
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    good video on disc brake alignment.
    It mentions one trick that has not been mentioned in here, watch the part about loosening one mounting bolt at a time AFTER you've done the alignment and pads are still rubbing. Never thought about that one.

    Last edited by aclinjury; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:59 PM.

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