New XTR Chain on used XTR Cassette & jockey wheels making my rear derailleur 'swing'
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  1. #1
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    New XTR Chain on used XTR Cassette & jockey wheels making my rear derailleur 'swing'

    I replaced my XTR chain two days ago and was riding 'softly' in order to make my used cassette adapt to the new chain.

    Using the middle and small chain ring, whenever I applied stress on the chain riding in a sprocket that was relatively new, I noticed that my rear derailleur was being 'swung' whenever the pressure was relatively substantial.

    Moreover, using the large chain ring, I did not see this happen since the rear derailleur would already be 'extended' when using the large chain ring.

    I thought of having the jocket wheels replaced maybe that is the cause. However, I am not sure, thus hopefully someone here can suggest the cause of the problem.

    Thank you for your advice!

  2. #2
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    See your other thread for the answer.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pancho's Balls
    See your other thread for the answer.
    LOL.

    Asad

  4. #4
    Larry Lackapants
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    The chain gets "caught" by the front ring, i.e. is pulled back up instead of disengaging the ring.
    If it were the sprockets, I think it would have a lot gotten messier real quick. (i.e. torn RD, torn rd hanger etc..)

    This usually can happen with small diameter aluminum rings, as I've read somewhere.
    The idea is not to mix up worn chainring with new chain.
    Or i might be wrong.
    "There are only 3 motivating factors that change human behavior; pain, fear or ambition. Which button do you want to press?" Steve Hogg

  5. #5
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    I agree, it's almost certainly worn chainrings. This always pops up worst on the smaller diameter rings where you get chain suck with a new chain on a worn ring. You probably will need to replace the chain rings.

    Jockey wheels should spin free when there's no chain on there. If they are binding up that would cause a major malfunction as already mentioned.

    Some suspension designs can pull on the chain too when they compress. You didn't mention if your bike is full suspension, but if you're compressing a suspension when putting in a good effort going uphill in the small ring that can also apply tension to the chain I believe. Still, I think your main culprit here is likely the worn chain rings.

  6. #6
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    Will chain adapt?

    Quote Originally Posted by brblue
    The chain gets "caught" by the front ring, i.e. is pulled back up instead of disengaging the ring.
    If it were the sprockets, I think it would have a lot gotten messier real quick. (i.e. torn RD, torn rd hanger etc..)

    This usually can happen with small diameter aluminum rings, as I've read somewhere.
    The idea is not to mix up worn chainring with new chain.
    Or i might be wrong.

    oh, is that the reason? I already tore up my LX Deore rear derailleur on my other bike due to this reason.

    However, why is this not an issue when using the largest 44 chain ring?

    What can I do? Will the chain adapt?

  7. #7
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    Any other solution?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristatos
    I agree, it's almost certainly worn chainrings. This always pops up worst on the smaller diameter rings where you get chain suck with a new chain on a worn ring. You probably will need to replace the chain rings.

    Jockey wheels should spin free when there's no chain on there. If they are binding up that would cause a major malfunction as already mentioned.

    Some suspension designs can pull on the chain too when they compress. You didn't mention if your bike is full suspension, but if you're compressing a suspension when putting in a good effort going uphill in the small ring that can also apply tension to the chain I believe. Still, I think your main culprit here is likely the worn chain rings.
    Thanks for your help!

    As i mentioned in the other reply, I already lost a 2 month old rear derailleur on my Cannondale F1000SL SL bike. XC Bike.

    This bike is the Cannondale F4000SL Lefty 2006 Team bike. XC Bike.

    Do you think the chain will adapt just like a road bike chain will adapt?

    Why does a road bike chain ring not pose such a chain ring problem? Usually it's the cassette problem with road bikes. Ironically, only 1 sprocket is giving me issues on this bike.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Replace/rotate your chains more often. on my mtb, I rotate chains fairly regularly to extend life of the drivetrain, so that I'll go through 3-4 chains before having to replace rings/cassette. Not as much of an issue with larger chainrings on the road bikes.

    I agree with others, time to pony up for some new chainrings and perhaps cassette. if hanging up on only one rear sprocket, you should be able to get single sprockets from some place like harris cyclery or a decent LBS (or buy an inexpensive cassette to pirate rings from, like a deore).

  9. #9
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    thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by logbiter
    Replace/rotate your chains more often. on my mtb, I rotate chains fairly regularly to extend life of the drivetrain, so that I'll go through 3-4 chains before having to replace rings/cassette. Not as much of an issue with larger chainrings on the road bikes.

    I agree with others, time to pony up for some new chainrings and perhaps cassette. if hanging up on only one rear sprocket, you should be able to get single sprockets from some place like harris cyclery or a decent LBS (or buy an inexpensive cassette to pirate rings from, like a deore).
    thanks for the suggestions.

    I usually get in around 10,000km on my Campy chain on my road bikes... but on my MTBs it's like the chain needs replacement every 3,000km! I guess the chain ring sizes are an issue with mtb chains.

  10. #10
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    how many km?

    Quote Originally Posted by logbiter
    Replace/rotate your chains more often. on my mtb, I rotate chains fairly regularly to extend life of the drivetrain, so that I'll go through 3-4 chains before having to replace rings/cassette. Not as much of an issue with larger chainrings on the road bikes.

    I agree with others, time to pony up for some new chainrings and perhaps cassette. if hanging up on only one rear sprocket, you should be able to get single sprockets from some place like harris cyclery or a decent LBS (or buy an inexpensive cassette to pirate rings from, like a deore).
    how many km do you change your mtb chains?

  11. #11
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    mileage varies, depends more upon how dirty & when I have time to do it. But, I rotate 2-3 chains, changing ~ every month, at least when they're getting used 'n dirty.
    I've always meant to keep better track with tracking, stretch, etc, but have never been banal about it.

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