No Shimano Chainrings
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Tlaloc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    427

    No Shimano Chainrings

    I overhaul my girlfriend's and my bikes every year before our state's annual supported road bike tour. Every three years or so this includes putting on new chainrings.

    This morning I tried to order new Shimano chainrings for 10 speed Ultegra and 11 speed DuraAce 9000. I tried to order them at eight on-line retailers. All of them listed them as either unavailable or back-ordered until the last week of July or sometime in August. I went to my local Shimano dealer and tried to order them there but their computer shows all big chainrings as unavailable until some time in August. I was able to order some of them at amazon.com.

    Seriously? Jesus Shimano what are you dong?

  2. #2
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    14,933
    While it is stupid that Shimano would run out of them it happens. They've run out of SPD cleats before...for 2-3months. How much wear are you putting on your chain(s) before replacing them? In 40 years of road riding/mtb riding/racing I've worn out precisely zero chainrings. I see worn out chainrings at work all the time but it's obviously always people that pay little or no attention to chain wear.
    #promechaniclife

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    21,277
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    While it is stupid that Shimano would run out of them it happens. They've run out of SPD cleats before...for 2-3months. How much wear are you putting on your chain(s) before replacing them? In 40 years of road riding/mtb riding/racing I've worn out precisely zero chainrings. I see worn out chainrings at work all the time but it's obviously always people that pay little or no attention to chain wear.
    Chain ring life obviously depends on the quality of the rings, the quality of the maintenance of the drive train, choice of gears (always riding in the small ring means faster wear because the chain is engaging fewer teeth), and the power output of the rider. All that said, I typically get over 50,000 miles from Campagnolo chain rings. For me, that's over 5 years of riding.

  4. #4
    Banned Sock Puppet
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,901
    The answer is simple: Ride in the small ring until you wear it out too, then replace the whole crankset. Sorry, I couldn't resist.
    "If someone needs 200 rolls of toilet paper for a 14-day quarantine, they probably should have made a doctor's appointment way before the COVID-19 outbreak." -- Unknown

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.




  5. #5
    Adorable Furry Hombre
    Reputation: Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    29,130
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    The answer is simple: Ride in the small ring until you wear it out too, then replace the whole crankset. Sorry, I couldn't resist.
    Of course...small rings wear out faster than big rings. Just changed out a 30T on my subcompact
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    21,277
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Of course...small rings wear out faster than big rings.
    Only if you spend more time in them

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Srode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,748
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Of course...small rings wear out faster than big rings. Just changed out a 30T on my subcompact
    Small ring is for sissies
    Gravel Rocks

    Trek Domane
    Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike)
    Niner RLT9 RDO
    BH G7 Disc
    Trek Crockett

    "The Spirit of the Party "serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection

  8. #8
    Banned Sock Puppet
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,901
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Only if you spend more time in them
    This may have been a tongue in cheek remark, but seriously, I would think that if you spent equal time in each ring, the small one would wear out faster due to the fact that there are fewer teeth to share the load.
    "If someone needs 200 rolls of toilet paper for a 14-day quarantine, they probably should have made a doctor's appointment way before the COVID-19 outbreak." -- Unknown

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.




  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    21,277
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    This may have been a tongue in cheek remark, but seriously, I would think that if you spent equal time in each ring, the small one would wear out faster due to the fact that there are fewer teeth to share the load.
    Agree. That said, I see a lot of people riding in something close to small-small when they would be better served in the big ring and higher up the cassette. Lower chain friction and less chain and chain ring wear. I live with rolling hills (600 feet of climbing in a typical 30 mile ride) and only need the small ring occasionally. I would think you'd have to live in serious mountains to spend half the time on the small ring.

  10. #10
    Banned Sock Puppet
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,901
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Agree. That said, I see a lot of people riding in something close to small-small when they would be better served in the big ring and higher up the cassette. Lower chain friction and less chain and chain ring wear. I live with rolling hills (600 feet of climbing in a typical 30 mile ride) and only need the small ring occasionally. I would think you'd have to live in serious mountains to spend half the time on the small ring.
    600ft in 30 miles is pretty flat. Sure, there may be some rolls, but overall, it's flat. I've done close to that on some rail trails.

    I wouldn't classify 30 miles as rolling until 1000ft. Just saying.
    "If someone needs 200 rolls of toilet paper for a 14-day quarantine, they probably should have made a doctor's appointment way before the COVID-19 outbreak." -- Unknown

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.




  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    9,380
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Agree. That said, I see a lot of people riding in something close to small-small when they would be better served in the big ring and higher up the cassette. Lower chain friction and less chain and chain ring wear. I live with rolling hills (600 feet of climbing in a typical 30 mile ride) and only need the small ring occasionally. I would think you'd have to live in serious mountains to spend half the time on the small ring.
    I'm going to guess the typical road rider puts out a lot more power, on average, in the small ring as compared to big ring so even with the number of teeth aside I doubt even use would be anywhere near even wear.

    I don't use a power meter but I'm pretty certain whatever power I put out on average in the small ring (climbing) is much higher than the average for the time I'm in the big ring. So the wear rate would not be equal.

  12. #12
    Banned Sock Puppet
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    10,901
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I'm going to guess the typical road rider puts out a lot more power, on average, in the small ring as compared to big ring so even with the number of teeth aside I doubt even use would be anywhere near even wear.

    I don't use a power meter but I'm pretty certain whatever power I put out on average in the small ring (climbing) is much higher than the average for the time I'm in the big ring. So the wear rate would not be equal.
    I'm guessing it would be the same for me. I generally stay in the small ring unless I need more speed than it can give me. If I'm in the big ring and I see a hill ahead or need to slow down or stop, I first drop to the small ring before I move anything in back.
    "If someone needs 200 rolls of toilet paper for a 14-day quarantine, they probably should have made a doctor's appointment way before the COVID-19 outbreak." -- Unknown

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.




  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    394
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    The answer is simple: Ride in the small ring until you wear it out too, then replace the whole crankset. Sorry, I couldn't resist.
    I'm looking to change my Ultegra 52/36 to 50/34 and it may well be cheaper to go for the new crankset.
    Bradley

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3,883
    When I'm riding and I see a hill, I just go the other way. I never ride in my little ring, I'm not even sure if I have one.~
    BANNED

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,297
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    The answer is simple: Ride in the small ring until you wear it out too, then replace the whole crankset. Sorry, I couldn't resist.
    I have to admit that this is my strategy with my road bike and commuter. I take better care of my MTB.

Similar Threads

  1. I Found Myself Laughingly Saying, "NO NO NO NO"
    By Akirasho in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-27-2018, 05:48 AM
  2. are sram red chainrings compatable with shimano chainrings ?
    By joker in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-17-2012, 09:36 AM
  3. No dancing, no singing, no clapping, no praying...
    By TerminatorX91 in forum Politics Only
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 07-29-2011, 07:59 AM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-31-2009, 02:47 PM
  5. Episode II: No Beer, No Carbs, No Problem?
    By StageHand in forum Commuting, Touring and Ride Reports
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-08-2005, 09:20 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.