Question: Upgrading my rear hub and switching cassette from 10sp to 11sp
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  1. #1
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    Question: Upgrading my rear hub and switching cassette from 10sp to 11sp

    I'm hoping to get some advice from you guys who know components better than I do. In 2012, I took a wheel building class at the LBS and built myself a set of wheels with Kinlin rims, Sapim spokes, and a 10 sp. cassette on a Velocity race hub. I'd like to put this wheel set on my newer bike that is 11 sp.

    The nice folks at Velocity have stated that I could purchase a new cassette body called the CB22. Here's the link:

    Velocity - Cassette Body - Race Hub

    This will make my rear hub able to accept an 11 sp. cassette, which I will also purchase. Question: Regarding tools required to remove the current cassette, do I really need to buy a chain whip tool or can I use a rag and a tight grip to hold the cassette in place while I use the cassette specific tool to loosen it?

    Second, once the new CB22 cassette body is on the hub, I could put the old 10 sp. cassette back on if I wanted in the future, correct? I have one bike that is still 10 sp. My main goal for now is to get it to 11 sp, but in case I wanted to switch it back, I'm hoping that would be OK.

    Any advice is much appreciated.

  2. #2
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    I think you'll have a tough time trying to hold it. Cassette nut is pretty tight. If you are going to be changing cassettes it is a pretty cheap tool and worth having.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by skhan007 View Post
    Question: Regarding tools required to remove the current cassette, do I really need to buy a chain whip tool or can I use a rag and a tight grip to hold the cassette in place while I use the cassette specific tool to loosen it?


    No that is a bad idea. It probably won't work without damaging the cassette.

    Two options:

    1) Make a chain whip from an old chain and a small piece of angle iron.

    2) Clamp a piece of chain in vice grips. Put another piece of chain on a cassette cog. Rest the vice grip on the chain on the cog and wrap the piece of chain that is in the vice grip around the cassette.

    - You also need a cassette tool. If you don't have any of that stuff, just take it to a shop. It will cost less to have a shop do the switch than it will cost for the tools necessary to do the switch

    Final thought - can you pull the cassette and freehub body off together? IOW, you may not actually have to remove the cassette from the freehub body to pull the body off of the hub.

  4. #4
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    Unless your locking ring was way under torqued, you will never hold it with your hand. For $10, buy the chain whip (or make one). You are going to have to buy the socket as well. $25 total for the tools will be a worthy investment. I use mine once a month or so it seems.

  5. #5
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    Ok, thanks! I didn't realize the chain whip and cassette tool would only set me back around $25. May not be a bad idea to have these in the toolbox for future use, especially if I am switching things around between 10 speed and 11 speed bikes.

    I don't believe the free hub can come off without loosening it with various allen keys. That is what the instructional video from velocity demonstrated.

    The replacement free hub cassette body is around $75, plus the cost of the replacement cassette, plus the cost of the tools. I found something called the Edco monoblock, Which appears to be a cassette replacement for my scenario. Unfortunately it looks cost prohibitive compared to what we're talking about here.

  6. #6
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    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerjulio View Post
    Thanks. That is indeed more affordable than the Edco mono block.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by skhan007 View Post
    I don't believe the free hub can come off without loosening it with various allen keys. That is what the instructional video from velocity demonstrated.
    You only have to remove the endcap with an allen key. The freehub body just pulls off after the end caps are removed.

    Give it a try - you have to replace both the cassette and body for 11 speed. Unless you want the cassette for another bike, there is no real reason to separate them.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    You only have to remove the endcap with an allen key. The freehub body just pulls off after the end caps are removed.

    Give it a try - you have to replace both the cassette and body for 11 speed. Unless you want the cassette for another bike, there is no real reason to separate them.
    Bingo! Thanks. I was able to get it removed. Just waiting for new cassette body to arrive in the mail and I'll put my new 11 sp. cassette on.

    I'm hoping that's all that's required- not sure if there are any washers/spacers involved or anything. My hope is to put on the new cassette body, the cassette, tighten up, and put it on the bike.

  10. #10
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    Not that it matters now and it's a bit pricey, but I stopped using chain whips when this thing was invented. I think recently Park has come out with their own version and I"m sure everyone else will soon too. I strongly prefer this tool to a chain whip. The only chain whip type of tool I use now a days is the wear checker for the cogs.

    Vise Whip - Tools - Pedro's NA


    Do you just LOVE fumbling with awkward tools, slamming you knuckles into sharp gear teeth, and making tasks harder than they should be?? If so, you should stop reading and give your chain whip a big hug! However, if you've been looking to throw your chain whip into the woods, never to be seen again, you've come to the right place.
    use a torque wrench

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by skhan007 View Post

    I'm hoping that's all that's required- not sure if there are any washers/spacers involved or anything. My hope is to put on the new cassette body, the cassette, tighten up, and put it on the bike.
    Have a look at the link you provided and note that it come with axle spacers and end caps.
    I would think you'll need to have the wheel re-dished but not 100% on that. I think that because why else would they give you new end-caps if it wasn't to change the position of the hub between the drop outs.

  12. #12
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    The spacer will change the OLD from 130 mm to 131 mm.

    ONE mm in overall width will move the centre by one half a mm.

    I invite all reading this to look at a ruler and contemplate ONE HALF a mm.

    It is about 2/100 of an inch.

    If a redish is needed it's only because it was bad in the first place.
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

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