Rattle can success stories?
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  1. #1
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    Rattle can success stories?

    Is painting a bike, wrenching??? Not sure if this belongs here or in Bikes, Frames and Forks... anywho...

    I have an 80's steel Trek 420 frame and fork. I had thought of going the powder coat route, but the cheapest quote I can find in my area is $200. I know that's not unreasonable for powder coating, but it's more than I want to invest in a bike that will just be for tooling around.

    Has anybody who has gone the DIY rattle can route been happy with the job long-term? Care to share? What product did you use? What process did you follow. All told how much did it cost?
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

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  2. #2
    'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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    It's definitely possible to do a nice job. That said I think it's nearly impossible to rattle can a durable paint job. There are some places that do auto paint and can put it in spray cans for you. They can tint primer and have what is probably good clear coat. I'd look into those places.
    #promechaniclife

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    Has anybody who has gone the DIY rattle can route been happy with the job long-term? Care to share? What product did you use? What process did you follow. All told how much did it cost?
    Flat black Rustoleum is a never-fail. Looks like crap and doesn't hold up, but definitely cheap. Building on cx's idea, you might find a paint shop that would finish your frame with whatever they were using on the previous job just to run out the paint reservoir. Worth a few phone calls to ask.

  4. #4
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    Thanks, cx and Kerry... I'll check out some body shops and see what they can do.

    I've also seen adverts for Spray Bike (https://spraybike.us). Seems like glorified spray paint, but I don't know. Anyone given it a try? Is it any better than Krylon or Rustoleum?

    Meanwhile, if anybody else has a success story, let me know how you did it.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  5. #5
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    There is nothing wrong with rattle can paint. Usually what is wrong is the prep, you need to do the prep like a professional, and the rattle can paint will stay on.
    You're probably not interested in that either, so just clean it up a bit, paint it and keep a couple extra cans for later touchups.
    Last edited by duriel; 07-17-2020 at 08:06 AM.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    Is painting a bike, wrenching??? Not sure if this belongs here or in Bikes, Frames and Forks... anywho...

    I have an 80's steel Trek 420 frame and fork. I had thought of going the powder coat route, but the cheapest quote I can find in my area is $200. I know that's not unreasonable for powder coating, but it's more than I want to invest in a bike that will just be for tooling around.

    Has anybody who has gone the DIY rattle can route been happy with the job long-term? Care to share? What product did you use? What process did you follow. All told how much did it cost?
    IMHO....I'd just pay the $200 for a powdercoat. How much do you value your time running around, playing phone tag, trying to half-a$$ a job that'll need redone in a year anyway? You want it done right and to stick--that means proper prep work/time. Again, how much do you value your time at?


    Take $200 and divide it by your hourly income....factor in prep time (strip the frame, mask all threads/bearing interfaces), primer, and painting, and phone calls, and drying...you're not coming out ahead, especially when you need to redo it all again in a year.
    "We are doomed to live in very interesting times"

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    There is nothing wrong with rattle can paint. Usually what is wrong is the prep, you need to do the prep like a professional, and the rattle can paint will stay on.
    You're probably not interested in that either, so just clean it up a bit, paint it and keep a couple extra cans for later touchups.
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    IMHO....I'd just pay the $200 for a powdercoat. How much do you value your time running around, playing phone tag, trying to half-a$$ a job that'll need redone in a year anyway? You want it done right and to stick--that means proper prep work/time. Again, how much do you value your time at?


    Take $200 and divide it by your hourly income....factor in prep time (strip the frame, mask all threads/bearing interfaces), primer, and painting, and phone calls, and drying...you're not coming out ahead, especially when you need to redo it all again in a year.
    Lately... with everything going on in the world I've got much more time on my hands than I do money. So puttering in the garage and taking my time with the prep work isn't a big deal if I can get a decent result.

    btw, I just got my first estimate back from a local body shop. $450... ouch.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  8. #8
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    Pro painter showing you how to do it at home. Btw I've painted many frames at home with excellent results with rattle can but it only lasts 2 to 3 yrs using clear lacquer. However you can achieve much better results with a 2k polyurethane clear that most auto shops carry. Prep is the most important thing for best results, so don't skimp on the time & effort needed for that.
    https://youtu.be/rsD3E0b6mko

  9. #9
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    It can be done, but there is a lot of prep work that needs to happen in order to have nice completed job.

    First you need to remove all the old paint currently on the bike using combination of paint stripper/remover and wire brush wheel/drill.

    Once all the paint has been removed, sand the bear metal frame with 400/600 grit sandpaper. Then primer the frame immediately after, depending the air quality around you (moisture in the air) small micro deposits can settle on the frame and will ruin your paint in the long run with under coated rust forming.

    After priming and sanding each coat a few time using different grades of sand paper you will be ready to paint.

    After each completely dried coat of paint, don't forget to sand lightly again using 400/600 sandpaper until use have nice clean/smooth finish

    Once you completed your final coat and it's fully cured, apply a clear coat very lightly, about two to three.

    If your capable of handling that along with having the patients to the job right, then I say go ahead... oh by the way, you'll spend about the same... maybe a little under the $200 quote received for powered coating.

    And if were me, I wouldn't bother with DIY if your not taking the time and doing custom paint job.
    Last edited by ROAD&DIRT; 07-17-2020 at 10:34 AM.
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  10. #10
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    THIS GUY has great painting videos and he's entertaining. The linked video might be just what you're looking for.

    Tip: If you decide to sand off an imperfection in your paint application and spray on a touch up, you MUST wait 48 hours after sanding. Sanding activates something in the paint so immediate application of additional paint causes wicked spider webbing.

    This might only hold true for Rustoleum or the other popular brands, but that's the word I got from Rustoleum after it happened to me.

  11. #11
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    I would like to see a picture of the "before". A Trek 420 was my first real, non-BMX, bike. Loved that thing!

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    These guys are reasonably priced. But it's automotive paint.. so find the paint code for the color car you like
    https://www.automotivetouchup.com/touch-up-paint/

    As far as using rattle can, as others have said, prep is important. Also, you can repaint immediately after sanding. You don't need to completely remove the current coating, scuff it up with 120, then use a good sandable primer, when the primer dries (and I am not talking generic wood primer, a quality epoxy primer), sand with 180, or 220, then use your rattle can paint. when that is dry, use an automotive clear coat (regular clear or lacquer will chip easily). After it dries completely, wet sand starting with 1000 grit up to 6000 (it will take longer, unless you are comfortable with using 600, but that will remove a lot of material).. After 6k, you can polish it to a shine or leave it matte if you like that.

    Or, if you live in the DC area you can use my Fujispray hvlp turbine sprayer....

  13. #13
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    I did a really nice rattle can job on an 80s steel shogun.

    As others have said, thorough preparation is key.

    Also, I highly recommend taking everything off of the frame before you start -- bb, headset included.

    I did the painting outside on a windless, warm, dry day... with the frame on my workstand so I could paint the hard to reach areas easily.

  14. #14
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    Rattle can success stories?

    Quote Originally Posted by burgrat View Post
    I would like to see a picture of the "before". A Trek 420 was my first real, non-BMX, bike. Loved that thing!
    Here it was in itís original Frankenbike stage not long after I got it.



    Now itís completely stripped including the headset cups and Iím sanding off the clear coat and some surface rust.





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    Last edited by Opus51569; 07-18-2020 at 01:28 PM.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    I did a really nice rattle can job on an 80s steel shogun.

    As others have said, thorough preparation is key.

    Also, I highly recommend taking everything off of the frame before you start -- bb, headset included.

    I did the painting outside on a windless, warm, dry day... with the frame on my workstand so I could paint the hard to reach areas easily.
    What kind of prep did you do? Did you knock the existing paint down, or did you strip it to bare metal?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    What kind of prep did you do? Did you knock the existing paint down, or did you strip it to bare metal?
    I took it down to near bare metal, except in places that had rust. Where there was rust, I took it down to bare metal, then primed it immediately with a good primer.

    Once the old paint layers were sanded uniformly thin, finely roughed up with fine sandpaper, and completely clean of dust and remnants, I viewed the remaining paint as a primer.

    This was my first MTB, bought in 1986, with a nice Tange CroMoly double butted frame. And it had been ridden many miles hard... as an MTB on technical trails in rain, mud, snow, rocks, gravel, water, etc. ... and then as a commuter for a few years into downtown philly from the northwest burbs, 10 miles each way in all kinds of weather, including salted city streets in winter.

    When I saw how well the original factory paint job had held up to decades of the worst kind of conditions, I gave it due respect, and decided to take it down to the original primer and no further.

  17. #17
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    Good to know. Thanks. Iíve knocked down the clear coat on the 420 and removed the surface rust. I discovered one small dent/crease in the top tube but otherwise the frame and forks are in remarkably good shape. The dent actually makes me feel a little better about being a cheapskate and not sinking too much money into it.

    Once I get everything smooth, I will wipe it down with alcohol and then coat it with some Rustoleum primer to protect it while I figure out what to do next.

    If I end up painting it myself, I'm not sure what color. I had originally thought a tan color with components in black. But now I'm leaning toward either a blue or a purple.
    Last edited by Opus51569; 07-19-2020 at 08:23 AM.
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  18. #18
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    I have an old Ranger that I had to repair the roof on, including repaint. I used a rattle can epoxy primer I found on the internets. The hardener is in a capsule inside the can; I had to use the cap and slam it down on the workbench to activate and then I think I had an hour to spray it. Whatever primer you use, make sure it's compatible with the paint you intend to use.

    I used a lacquer based paint as enamel gets chalky in the sun. It was at the local whatever CarQuest turned into in rattle cans and was meant to match OEM automotive paint colors.

    It turned out ok, not professional by any means but functional, and seems to be holding up well through the salty winters the last 5 years. As everyone said before, I've always heard the prep is the most important piece.

    And make sure you tent wherever you spray it well to keep dust out and overspray in. The off-white dust had finally mostly gone away last summer, just in time to paint my kid's minibike frame orange and now I have orange dust all over everything in my garage. I'm a slow learner.

    Also wear PPE (proper respirator for the product type) to avoid damage to CNS and whatnot. I used to work in a cabinet shop and the finish guy was a fried out old hippie. He sometimes wouldn't wear the respirator. He was goofy to begin with but would get downright weird. As a dumb kid I thought it was funny but now not so much.

    One benefit of paint instead of powder coat is you can touch it up. Powdercoat is a lot tougher, but eventually will crack or chip somewhere.
    Last edited by bilbo; 07-20-2020 at 06:16 AM. Reason: Added bit about powdercoat.

  19. #19
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    Waiting on a slightly less humid day to spray on some primer.

    Meanwhile, a question... with the minor dent in to top tube would Bondo work as a cosmetic fix or would the flex of the frame cause the Bondo to crack over time?
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    Waiting on a slightly less humid day to spray on some primer.

    Meanwhile, a question... with the minor dent in to top tube would Bondo work as a cosmetic fix or would the flex of the frame cause the Bondo to crack over time?
    I have the equivalent of a PhD in Bondo from when I drove cars with perpetually rusty quarter panels and rocker panels in the 1970s... back when pennsylvania required inspections every six months and rust was a fail point.

    That said, I'd recommend filling in the dent with some kind of do-it-yourself braze-type thing-deal. If you prep the inside of the dent properly, you could probably use regular plumbing solder and a blowtorch (the kind RBR'ers toast panniers with).

    I have no idea if this is viable, but that's what I'd do. Partially because I think that if I ever smell bondo again, I might get PTSD.

  21. #21
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    DO NOT TAKE ANY TORCH TO YOUR BIKE FRAME! WAIDIOT!

    Clean it up and put some epoxy in it, that will stick.
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  22. #22
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    Rattle can success stories?

    A torch is a no-go. Not that I have anything against inadvertently toasting a pannier or two, but I donít have a torch on hand. I donít have Bondo either, but I can get a tube of premixed putty for $8.





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    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    DO NOT TAKE ANY TORCH TO YOUR BIKE FRAME! WAIDIOT!

    Clean it up and put some epoxy in it, that will stick.
    I'm talking about dripping hot solder into a well-prepped dent that is fluxed then pinpoint heated with a pinpoint flame.

    I just like to say BLOWtorch after the pannier fire thread.

  24. #24
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    A little Bondo... some plastic to make an ersatz paint booth in the garage... and we have some primer.




    Now I have to wait for it to dry so I can sand down all the runs and drips...


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    I'm talking about dripping hot solder into a well-prepped dent that is fluxed then pinpoint heated with a pinpoint flame. I just like to say BLOWtorch after the pannier fire thread.
    Have you ever done this before? Please post pictures, cause we want to see the result!
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