Real World Wheel Comparison
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    178

    Real World Wheel Comparison

    I have narrowed my wheel choices down to basically two different set ups. I was hoping that someone had some real world experience or information that may help get me over the edge. So far, I have had a lot of "wheels are the best place to upgrade" and just as many "new wheel are not going to make a difference." That combined with the fact that I have tried to base the decision on theoretical assumptions about a wheels performance has me at a high level of frustration.

    Little background first. I am about 210-215lbs, ride mostly fast group rides (22-28mph with some time spent at 30+) in flat, sometimes windy south Florida. Been riding almost 2 years and have improved greatly in that time. Ride a Lemond with stock Matrix Aurora wheels. So here is what I am considering.

    Every study I have been able to find shows that "aero" qualities will increase performance whereas weight reduction will not (I realize this is an oversimplification.) I am on a budget so really deep section, carbon rims are not an option so I am looking at using Velocity Deep V. Seems to have a good reputation as a reliable rim with "aero" qualities but relatively heavy. I think claimed weight is 520g but I have seen a couple of actual weight listings at 560 or so. Im not a small guy so extremely light weight is out of the question anyway. Question is, is there enough aero advantage to increase performance and to justify the weight? This considering the performance improvement I am looking for is to increase the speed I can sustain and the time I can sustain it. I figure it doesnt matter much when in the pack but I want to be better when on the front, and off the front for that matter. I am also intrigued by the local time trial series and may be interested in participating in the future. I am fully aware that the best way to increase performance is training so I am doing that. Just looking at the wheel issue here.

    I am also looking at one of the 25mm deep rims like the Sun Venus or Velocity Fusion. Both are billed as semi-aero without the weight penalty. My concern is that they are not light enough to feel like I have light wheels and that there may be no real world aero advantage at all.

    I also have a hub question. How does the Velocity hub compare to Ultegra? From what I can tell, they are cartridge bearing but dont know if that is something I should consider as opposed to the Ultegra. I may also consider a DA front hub to be able to go to 24 spokes in front. Ive seen the speedcific offerings at oddsandendos but if I go that route, I wont be able to go with the CXRay spokes. My budget is about $325. Any help here would be greatly appreciated too.

    So there you have it. Another long, drawn out wheel question that im sure isnt worth the time ive spent worrying about it. My guess is i cant go wrong either way but really need something to help me make the decision. I know there are some wheel builders out there and some guys who have used several different wheels so I am hoping some of you have some real world scoop, theories aside.

    Thanks for you help.

  2. #2
    jhr
    jhr is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    129

    wheel questions

    I will try and provide as much objective information (not much actually) as I can.

    First your conclusions about aero versus weight is correct. Current thinking (see archives at bike.com, Craig Willett article) is that aero is 10 times more important that weight except in extreme cases (ie Alp du Huez type climb).

    Unfortunately, I don't think there is a lot of data on 30mm rims, and how much (if at all) more aero they are than standard rims. Depending of the rims width (which is important) most rims are not considered truly "aero" until they are approaching 40mm. I believe the deepest section aluminum rim available is 34mm (Am. Classic 420). So to go 40mm and above you really need to go carbon fiber.

    On the other hand, I don't believe there is any evidence to show that a 30mm aero aluminum rim is less aero than a box rim. Velocity and other 30mm deep rims are clearly stronger than standard box rims or open pro type rims. This is a useful consideration for you considering your 200+lb weight. The stronger 30mm deep rims can also be built with lower spoke counts and different spoke patterns (radial, 1x, etc.) which should, in theory, provide some aero benefit.

    I race cross (on wheels I build), and have built hundreds of wheels over the past 15+ years and I will not mess with a box rim anymore (open pros in particular are junk despite what people will tell you), you always get better results with a stout aero style rim. The alleged weight penalty that some will site is insignificant unless you are on a 7%+ grade, and the durability of the wheel is greatly enhanced (you can't win if you don't finish).

    Hope this helps you.

    jhr

  3. #3

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    52
    The other post was dead-on with his info. Weight doesn't matter as much as aero until the road becomes really steep. For a wheel to provide true "aero" benefits it needs to be at least 38mm deep so the 25-30mm rims you are looking at really won't give any noticable effects at all. Here's an interesting article on the effects of weight vs aero: http://www.bike.com/template.asp?dat...ectionnumber=6

    From: Kraig Willett - Wednesday, August 1, 2001----

    When evaluating wheel performance, wheel aerodynamics are the most important, distantly followed by wheel mass. Wheel inertia effects in all cases are so small that they are arguably insignificant.

    How can it be that wheel inertial forces are nearly insignificant, when the advertisements say that inertia is so important? Quite simply, inertial forces are a function of acceleration. In bike racing this peak acceleration is about .1 to .2 gs and is generally only seen when beginning from an initial velocity of 0 (see criterium race data in Appendix D ). Furthermore, the 0.3kg/0.66lb difference in wheels, even if this mass is out at the rim, is so small compared to your body mass that the differences in wheel inertia will be unperceivable. Any difference in acceleration due to bicycle wheels that is claimed by your riding buddies is primarily due to cognitive dissonance, or the placebo effect (they paid a lot of money for the wheels so there must be some perceivable gain).


    Also, according to John Cobb, bladed spokes and reduced spoke counts really don't matter too much at all. What really matters is rim depth. I've also read that a rim needs an aspect ratio of 3:1 (depth vs width) for ideal aero properties.

    I have a set of Velocity Spartacus wheels. The Velocity hubs are smooth and the rims are just about bomb proof but the wheels don't provide any real aero improvements over my Ksyriums and they are heavy.

    You might want to wait and save up your money for a set of true deep section aero wheels. You can find some good deals on ebay on Zipp 303/404's and Hed wheels.

    Check out this article on price/performance: http://www.bike.com/template.asp?dat...ectionnumber=6

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    64

    another option

    Check out ebay and you should be able to get a set of Spinergy Rev-X's for under your budget. I think these will fit your needs nicely.
    Good luck.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    545
    Quote Originally Posted by Money D
    Check out ebay and you should be able to get a set of Spinergy Rev-X's for under your budget. I think these will fit your needs nicely.
    Good luck.
    Until the rear hub goes out, and Spinergy's horrible customer service kicks in.

  6. #6

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    178
    Man, you guys are good. Thanks for the good links also. You all seem to confirm what I was thinking and I will probably go with the Deep V because it seems to be a proven rim.

    Now I just have to make a decision on spokes, spoke count, and hubs. Any votes on Velocity vs. Ultegra hubs?

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    3,235

    If you want a Velocity Deep V, watch ebay

    I picked up a set of Deep V on 28 hole Dura Ace hubs for about $175 last year. Several builders also put that wheel together for about your budgeted amount. They would be great wheels for you. Very stiff. I live on the West Coast of Florida and they are fine on our flatter ground and not bad in the wind either, which we have had plenty of this spring. Good Luck.

  8. #8

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    178
    I hear ya on the wind.

    What kind of ride quality do you get with Deep V compared to others you have ridden.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    3,235

    Ride is fine

    Mine are laced 3x with 14/15 DB spokes so they don't flex a lot, but they don't beat you up either. My other wheels are Mavic Heliums and Am Classic/Velocity Areoheads. The Deep Vs are definitely stiffer than the Am Classics, but they weigh more too. I weigh about 175 if that helps. I really like Velocity products, they don't get a lot of hype, but are very well made.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    143

    hold on

    I don't think the velocity deep-V rims are going to be any more aerodynamic than standard rims on the basis of their profile. Someone else mentioned that a 3:1 aspect ratio is needed before any aero' benefit is seen, and that would put you in the ballpark of a 40mm rim cross section (assuming you use a 20mm tire). The deep V as you know is 30mm.

    However, deeper rim cross section = increased rim rigidity, which allows distribution of radial loads across a larger portion of the wheel, which would allow you to use a lower spoke count without sacrificing durability (as long as spoke tension is cranked up to compensate). This is my limited understanding. And as far as I know, contrary to what somebody quoted John Cobb as saying, I thought reduced spoke count did make a difference. Come on, who are you going to trust-- Cobb or me? More info on wheel aerodynamics-- go to the Zipp website.

    Bladed spokes aren't worth it for most people under real world conditions. If you're a big guy and need to occasionally tune up your wheels, bladed spokes add another level of hassle. As far as "semi-aero" rims go, I think that's all marketing BS. An extra 4 or 5 mm of rim depth over an open pro does not make any difference in terms of aerodynamics. A great example: the Mavic Ksyrium, which is a bombproof, relatively lightweight wheel with reduced "aero" spoke count and "semi-aero" 25mm rims but no different from what you've got right now in terms of drag.

    Bottom line: get the deep V wheels if you want, but I think the majority of the difference you feel (if any) is going to be due to subjective differences in ride characteristics and placebo effect. Then again, the placebo effect is probably the very reason why I buy half the stuff I do, so why should I rain on your parade? Have fun.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    545
    Excellent points. The main reason I purchased my latest set of wheels was for weight and looks. There, I said it. When shopping around and asking local riders/racers, all the "slower" riders had every opinion on spoke count and this and that, but all the Cat 1s and 2s said, "Whatever makes you THINK you have an advantage when it's time to go fast is what you should get."

    Of course they all talked about durability and weight, blah blah blah, but the mental aspect of the buy is what will probably be worth more in terms of performance for the vast majority of riders. Think fast = feel fast = go fast.

    And yes, I will still get smoked by a rider on a bike that weighs 3 pounds more, and he'll probably have Open Pro rims and Ultegra hubs.




    Quote Originally Posted by supercrank
    I don't think the velocity deep-V rims are going to be any more aerodynamic than standard rims on the basis of their profile. Someone else mentioned that a 3:1 aspect ratio is needed before any aero' benefit is seen, and that would put you in the ballpark of a 40mm rim cross section (assuming you use a 20mm tire). The deep V as you know is 30mm.

    However, deeper rim cross section = increased rim rigidity, which allows distribution of radial loads across a larger portion of the wheel, which would allow you to use a lower spoke count without sacrificing durability (as long as spoke tension is cranked up to compensate). This is my limited understanding. And as far as I know, contrary to what somebody quoted John Cobb as saying, I thought reduced spoke count did make a difference. Come on, who are you going to trust-- Cobb or me? More info on wheel aerodynamics-- go to the Zipp website.

    Bladed spokes aren't worth it for most people under real world conditions. If you're a big guy and need to occasionally tune up your wheels, bladed spokes add another level of hassle. As far as "semi-aero" rims go, I think that's all marketing BS. An extra 4 or 5 mm of rim depth over an open pro does not make any difference in terms of aerodynamics. A great example: the Mavic Ksyrium, which is a bombproof, relatively lightweight wheel with reduced "aero" spoke count and "semi-aero" 25mm rims but no different from what you've got right now in terms of drag.

    Bottom line: get the deep V wheels if you want, but I think the majority of the difference you feel (if any) is going to be due to subjective differences in ride characteristics and placebo effect. Then again, the placebo effect is probably the very reason why I buy half the stuff I do, so why should I rain on your parade? Have fun.

  12. #12

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    178

    I carry an umbrella

    Bottom line: get the deep V wheels if you want, but I think the majority of the difference you feel (if any) is going to be due to subjective differences in ride characteristics and placebo effect. Then again, the placebo effect is probably the very reason why I buy half the stuff I do, so why should I rain on your parade? Have fun.[/QUOTE]


    I agree completely. I have seen a study that sites the Deep V compared to box style rim and actually shows an advantage in terms of watts required to roll at a given speed. Now, am I going to notice that? Probably not, but like you said, I know its there. I have pretty much decided on the Deep V. Saw them on a bike in a shop yesterday and loved the way they look. Which, after all, is all that matters anyway, right.

    I have now moved on to unnecessarily obsessing over hub choice. Shimano is forged, well known reputation. Velocity is cartridge bearing and I am assuming machined. Speedcific is cartridge bearing but cost more. So its Shimano or Velocity with CXRays, or Speedcific with Wheelsmith spokes.

    Anyone want to beat this one up for a while?

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    3,235

    Spokes

    Opinions will differ, look at all the above, but when I break a spoke, which doesn't happen often, I want to take the wheel to my LBS and get it fixed so I can get it back on the bike. So, unless your LBS carries the CXray spokes, I would opt for Wheelsmiths. My Dura Ace/Deep Vs are built with Wheelsmith spokes and they are great.
    That's the main reason I am going to be selling several sets of Heliums I have on ebay soon, not that they are bad wheels, its just getting harder to get those straight pull spokes that they are laced with.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    147

    Weighing in with Speedcific info

    I just purchased a set of wheels with Speedcific hubs and although I can not comment on durability yet, they are very smooth, smoother than my Campagnolo Chorus hubs and as smooth or smoother than Velomax hubs used on the Ascent IIs. I will post back once I get some info on wear and reliability in a month or so.

  15. #15
    AJS
    AJS is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,915
    ...Every study I have been able to find shows that "aero" qualities will increase performance whereas weight reduction will not...
    I have seen studies/experiments that say, with the infamous disclaimer: "all else being equal", that any truly aero wheel outperforms an up to 200 grams lighter non-aero wheel. Unfortunately, I just don't recall where/who did that study.

    Also, I've seen where you don't start getting significant aero improvements until/unless the rim depth is at least 38mm., as other's have said above. That's one reason I'm sure that Campy, (for instance) made what turned out to be one of the most aerodynamic wheels ever, the Shamal, with a 38mm. rim depth x-section. They indeed were an excellent wheelset - I owned a pair and wish I had never sold them.

    So, one of my personal conclusions has been that other than the increased strength of a rim like a Mavic CXP-33, Sun Venus or Swift-Ta 1, Velocity Deep-V or Fusion,etc. with a 25-30mm depth, there is no real gain over a shorter rim like Mavic OP or MA-2, Sun ME14A, Velocity Aerohead or Razor, DT Swiss 1.1, Campy Montreal, etc.

    On the fewer spokes or aero spokes issue, I think there IS a net gain in aero abilities, albeit fairly slight in many cases, especially when battling crosswinds.
    Last edited by AJS; 04-10-2004 at 07:52 AM.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    545
    So in theory, the American Classic 420 with its 34mm rim depth is pretty much "useless"?



    Quote Originally Posted by AJS
    I have seen studies/experiments that say, with the infamous disclaimer: "all else being equal", that any truly aero wheel outperforms an up to 200 grams lighter non-aero wheel. Unfortunately, I just don't recall where/who did that study.

    Also, I've seen where you don't start getting significant aero improvements until/unless the rim depth is at least 38mm., as other's have said above. That's one reason I'm sure that Campy, (for instance) made what turned out to be one of the most aerodynamic wheels ever, the Shamal, with a 38mm. rim depth x-section. They indeed were an excellent wheelset - I owned a pair and wish I had never sold them.

    So, one of my personal conclusions has been that other than the increased strength of a rim like a Mavic CXP-33, Sun Venus or Swift-Ta 1, Velocity Deep-V or Fusion,etc. with a 25-30mm depth, there is no real gain over a shorter rim like Mavic OP or MA-2, Sun ME14A, Velocity Aerohead or Razor, DT Swiss 1.1, Campy Montreal, etc.

    On the fewer spokes or aero spokes issue, I think there IS a net gain in aero abilities, albeit fairly slight in many cases, especially when battling crosswinds.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    143

    I think so

    Quote Originally Posted by bikewriter
    So in theory, the American Classic 420 with its 34mm rim depth is pretty much "useless"?
    According to Zipp's website, 38mm allows tapering of the rim profile at a relatively shallow angle. Go any shorter, and you either have to steepen the angle (resulting in boundary layer separation) or leave a blunt trailing rim edge (leading to increased wake formation). If you believe Zipp, the 34mm rim is no more aero' than a standard box rim.

  18. #18
    not feeling creative
    Reputation: cruso414's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    142

    If you are set on velocity check these guys out..

    I have dealt with them before and they are really great and will build anything that velocity makes and make recommendations based on what you are wanting to do.
    www.spinlitecycling.com

  19. #19

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    344
    I'm waiting for someone to post scientific data indicating the nanowatt drag differential of cartridge vs. loose ball bearing hubs. Of course the viscosity of the grease will make all the difference in the world.

  20. #20

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    73

    Couldn't have said it better myself !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by bikewriter
    Until the rear hub goes out, and Spinergy's horrible customer service kicks in.
    How do they stay in business ???

  21. #21
    AJS
    AJS is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,915
    So in theory, the American Classic 420 with its 34mm rim depth is pretty much "useless"?
    Apparently so.


    Spoiler -

    Maybe you should say that to the pro cyclists that shave their legs & arms?

    The differences in aerodynamics is not a subtle thing with a human-powered vehicle. Every small gain adds up. Your sarcastic example is a bit extreme, however since you mention viscosity, I can tell you that I do notice a decrease in gas mileage with my car when I use a heavier viscosity motor oil, so therefore I stick with the mfg's recommended 5W-30.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: mellowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    309
    Quote Originally Posted by power1369
    I just purchased a set of wheels with Speedcific hubs and although I can not comment on durability yet, they are very smooth, smoother than my Campagnolo Chorus hubs and as smooth or smoother than Velomax hubs used on the Ascent IIs. I will post back once I get some info on wear and reliability in a month or so.
    How are the hubs holding up?

  23. #23
    Old, slow, and fat.
    Reputation: MShaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    3,897
    Quote Originally Posted by Sympatico
    Little background first. I am about 210-215lbs, ride mostly fast group rides (22-28mph with some time spent at 30+) in flat, sometimes windy south Florida. Been riding almost 2 years and have improved greatly in that time. Ride a Lemond with stock Matrix Aurora wheels. So here is what I am considering.

    Thanks for you help.
    Weeelll, that was certainly a long way to ask "are these wheels good?"

    Having said that, yes, the Velocity Deep V/Ultegra wheels you're thinking about are gonna do fine. If you're easy on your wheels, you could probably get away with 24/28. If you're harder on your wheels/race crits, I'd go either 28/28 or 28/32.

    The front wheel being more aero is MUCH more important than the back wheel being aero. Not saying it don't matter that the back wheel's aero, it just don't matter as much.

    I built a pair for my neighbor a few years ago. He absolutely loves those wheels (24/24 Deep V/Am. Classic hubs) I've never had to touch them with a spoke wrench since.

    I have a pair of AL Cosmics. Like the Shamals, they're about the most aero thing I've ever ridden. Problem is they're heavy. Accelerating them out of corners and in a sprint SUCKS! The Deep Vs aren't nearly as bad for some reason.

    If you want truly aero, go Zipp young man.

    HTH,

    M
    I've moved back to NoVA. PLEASE change the weather!

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Posts
    197

    Have you made a decision...

    It has been a week or so since the last post. Just curious if you have done anything??

    Quote Originally Posted by Sympatico
    I have narrowed my wheel choices down to basically two different set ups. I was hoping that someone had some real world experience or information that may help get me over the edge. So far, I have had a lot of "wheels are the best place to upgrade" and just as many "new wheel are not going to make a difference." That combined with the fact that I have tried to base the decision on theoretical assumptions about a wheels performance has me at a high level of frustration.

    Little background first. I am about 210-215lbs, ride mostly fast group rides (22-28mph with some time spent at 30+) in flat, sometimes windy south Florida. Been riding almost 2 years and have improved greatly in that time. Ride a Lemond with stock Matrix Aurora wheels. So here is what I am considering.

    Every study I have been able to find shows that "aero" qualities will increase performance whereas weight reduction will not (I realize this is an oversimplification.) I am on a budget so really deep section, carbon rims are not an option so I am looking at using Velocity Deep V. Seems to have a good reputation as a reliable rim with "aero" qualities but relatively heavy. I think claimed weight is 520g but I have seen a couple of actual weight listings at 560 or so. Im not a small guy so extremely light weight is out of the question anyway. Question is, is there enough aero advantage to increase performance and to justify the weight? This considering the performance improvement I am looking for is to increase the speed I can sustain and the time I can sustain it. I figure it doesnt matter much when in the pack but I want to be better when on the front, and off the front for that matter. I am also intrigued by the local time trial series and may be interested in participating in the future. I am fully aware that the best way to increase performance is training so I am doing that. Just looking at the wheel issue here.

    I am also looking at one of the 25mm deep rims like the Sun Venus or Velocity Fusion. Both are billed as semi-aero without the weight penalty. My concern is that they are not light enough to feel like I have light wheels and that there may be no real world aero advantage at all.

    I also have a hub question. How does the Velocity hub compare to Ultegra? From what I can tell, they are cartridge bearing but dont know if that is something I should consider as opposed to the Ultegra. I may also consider a DA front hub to be able to go to 24 spokes in front. Ive seen the speedcific offerings at oddsandendos but if I go that route, I wont be able to go with the CXRay spokes. My budget is about $325. Any help here would be greatly appreciated too.

    So there you have it. Another long, drawn out wheel question that im sure isnt worth the time ive spent worrying about it. My guess is i cant go wrong either way but really need something to help me make the decision. I know there are some wheel builders out there and some guys who have used several different wheels so I am hoping some of you have some real world scoop, theories aside.

    Thanks for you help.

  25. #25

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    178

    Yep

    Quote Originally Posted by t-moore
    It has been a week or so since the last post. Just curious if you have done anything??

    I ended up getting a great deal on a set of Velocity Sparticus on ebay. Not bling bling I know but I couldnt pass up the price. I guess what it came down to was they were pretty much what I was looking at anyway, the price was fantastic, and the money I saved will be applied to a mountain bike!!! Didnt make sense to pay 3x as much for basically the same wheel and have no money to put toward another bike.

    I have only been on them 3 time so far but have very favorable initial impressions of them. Havent done any scientific testing ( not planning to either) but I can tell you that there is a noticable difference. My expectations were not incredibly high but I did expect to see an improvement in performance. Maybe the most I expected would be to be a little fresher at the end of a group ride to be able to contest a sprint or something like that. Not in some uber competitive wannabe group but we do like to have some fun with it.

    What I found was that the difference was more noticable. I noticed that at a given heart rate, I was able to maintain a higher speed than I was with the old wheels. I also have been able to maintain a higher top end speed for a longer time. All of which makes it more fun. Is the difference because of the 30mm rim depth? Or could it be the 20/24 spoke count? Or are these wheels actually lighter than my old ones?

    I actually dont know or care at this point but I can tell you there is a difference. I am very happy with them and I hope they end up being durable on top of it all. If not, at least I didnt spend too much money on them. Bonus is, even though they arent a popular boutique wheel, they actually look great on the bike. If nothing else, the bike "looks" faster.

    Thanks for asking.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Does 1 lb of fat = 1 lb of frame?
    By Bacco in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 08-03-2004, 09:21 PM
  2. Can Shimano wireless Flight Deck be used with rear wheel?
    By Larry Klassen in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-04-2004, 09:07 AM
  3. Richard Clarke KOs the Bushies ?
    By MR_GRUMPY in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: 03-31-2004, 12:06 PM
  4. The America I want
    By Flip Flash in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-02-2004, 02:00 PM
  5. Vento re-lacing complete! Track wheel now!
    By Qubeley in forum Fixed/Single Speed
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-23-2004, 09:28 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.