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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    Sit bone measuring is marketing. None of us sit on our sit bones - we sit on the narrower ischium.
    You mean ischial tuberosities? People call it "sit bone" for short in cycling communities. Which part of it bears weight depends on the rider's position. Some ride more upright, some others more bent. I have narrower sit bone width than average for my frame size and the saddles made for medium to wide sit bone width gave me all sorts of discomfort. When I switched to a narrower version of the same model, it felt much better.

    The saddles the OP has tried so far are mostly curved from left to right, putting the sit bones on angled surfaces. Try a saddle with a flatter rear surface.
    So, we do sit on our sit bones? Name:  scratch-basso87c9d.gif
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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    You mean ischial tuberosities? People call it "sit bone" for short in cycling communities. Which part of it bears weight depends on the rider's position. Some ride more upright, some others more bent. I have narrower sit bone width than average for my frame size and the saddles made for medium to wide sit bone width gave me all sorts of discomfort. When I switched to a narrower version of the same model, it felt much better.


    So, we do sit on our sit bones? Name:  scratch-basso87c9d.gif
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    We don't sit on the ischial tuberosities, we sit on the ischium or ischial ramus. You sit on the tuberosities when you sit upright in a chair, not when leaning forward on a bike.

    "Sit bones" are also short hand for the entire section of arched bones that run from the tuberosities to the pubis where they meet.


    Measuring the tuberosities, which you don't sit on, and then comparing that to an arbitrary number like outer saddle width is like measuring the width of your ankles and then using that number to select shoes by measuring the width of the outer sole. You might create a formula that is close for a certain brand of shoe, but that's all.

    The actual width of the two pelvic contact points each cyclist uses is going to be based on the shape of their pelvic bones and their pelvic tilt in riding position. There is no way of predicting that with any accuracy.

    We have many riders whose measured tuberosity width is greater than the total saddle width, yet are sitting on their "sit bones" in great comfort, and that's because the bones they are actually sitting on are much narrower.

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  3. #53
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    Based upon the pain description and my experience, the saddle is too wide. Plus, as tohers have advised, your normal placement configuration on the saddle.

    Have you tried a narrower saddle (or is the one that produced your pain description already narrow?)

    My experience, narrower saddle, move back onto that saddle and wear a tight, thin material underwear base (I use an Adidas product that is one size undersized) so that there exists some movement between layers. Kind of like bursa sacks due for muscle interface points...

    My 2 bits, but hey, it is the interweb...

    Sincerely, Good luck with the finding the solution.

  4. #54
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    I have over 25,000 miles on Moonsaddles. 60 day return. Try it you will like it. Plus factor - deters theft.

    Uniquely Comfortable Bicycle Saddle

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek2.3 View Post
    I have over 25,000 miles on Moonsaddles. 60 day return. Try it you will like it. Plus factor - deters theft.

    Uniquely Comfortable Bicycle Saddle
    Please. There are many good reasons there are probably about 7 or 8 people riding that saddle. You'd have to have some very unique fit issues for that to be the only option. Ever wonder why millions and millions of cyclists ride on saddles that are all shaped remarkably the same?
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  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek2.3 View Post
    I have over 25,000 miles on Moonsaddles. 60 day return. Try it you will like it. Plus factor - deters theft.

    Uniquely Comfortable Bicycle Saddle
    Designed specifically for cycling eccentrics! Be the first in YOUR cycling club to have other members whisper "what's up with THAT guy?"

    I'm not sure if it would be a theft deterrent. I'd bet if you left an expensive bike with THAT saddle on it unlocked, you'd come back in a couple of hours to find the bike gone, but the saddle laying on the ground..................
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  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Designed specifically for cycling eccentrics! Be the first in YOUR cycling club to have other members whisper "what's up with THAT guy?"

    I'm not sure if it would be a theft deterrent. I'd bet if you left an expensive bike with THAT saddle on it unlocked, you'd come back in a couple of hours to find the bike gone, but the saddle laying on the ground..................
    Hah! Yep, I'd believe that!
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  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Please. There are many good reasons there are probably about 7 or 8 people riding that saddle. You'd have to have some very unique fit issues for that to be the only option. Ever wonder why millions and millions of cyclists ride on saddles that are all shaped remarkably the same?
    I have read about another type of noseless saddle a few years ago (but have forgotten about it since). I personally think a noseless saddle makes a lot of sense with people with narrow hip, like me. I have gone thru at least 5 brands of top name saddles only to fine that all their noses rub my inner thigh too much, more than I like. This moon saddle is interesting, but it's way way too wide (10.7in), wider than I would need, and it's up there in the ugly department. Now if anyone makes a noseless or short-and-narrow-nose saddle that's no wider than say 140-150mm, and the aesthetic doesn't look like it's for a fat person, then I'd give it a try. Problem with many of these noseless saddle is that they're ugly, to the point that it ruins everything on the bike.

    i don't understand why can't they take a regular bike saddle and just make the nose short-and-narrow??? What's so hard about that. People with narrow hip and narrow sit bones will love these. As it is, most saddles from all the big makes are basically the same, have similar dimensions, and they expect this to work for people from 120 lbs to 200+ pounds. ugh, I'm in the 120 lb division
    Last edited by aclinjury; 07-18-2018 at 07:35 AM.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    I have read about another type of noseless saddle a few years ago (but have forgotten about it since). I personally think a noseless saddle makes a lot of sense with people with narrow hip, like me. I have gone thru at least 5 brands of top name saddles only to fine that all their noses rub my inner thigh too much, more than I like. This moon saddle is interesting, but it's way way too wide (10.7in), wider than I would need, and it's up there in the ugly department. Now if anyone makes a noseless or short-and-narrow-nose saddle that's no wider than say 140-150mm, and the aesthetic doesn't look like it's for a fat person, then I'd give it a try. Problem with many of these noseless saddle is that they're ugly, to the point that it ruins everything on the bike.

    i don't understand why can't they take a regular bike saddle and just make the nose shorter and wider??? What's so hard about that. People with narrow hip and narrow sit bones will love these. As it is, most saddles from all the big makes are basically the same, have similar dimensions, and they expect this to work for people from 120 lbs to 200+ pounds. ugh, I'm in the 120 lb division
    Have you tried the Specialized Power or the Pro saddle that has pretty much that same shape? They're shorter and have a somewhat wider rear section and a good sized pressure reduction groove/channel.
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  10. #60
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    As cxwrench mentioned, you might try the Specialized Power saddle. I was looking for what you describe and tried the Power when it 1st came out. Most comfortable saddle for me. I'm also narrow/light and got a lot of inner thigh rubbing with other saddles.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Have you tried the Specialized Power or the Pro saddle that has pretty much that same shape? They're shorter and have a somewhat wider rear section and a good sized pressure reduction groove/channel.
    (First of all, a little correction from me. I meant to say I want a saddle with "short and narrow" nose, not "short and wide". I have corrected my post above to state this)

    But ok, I haven't seen a couple riders with the Specialized Power. Nose is still too wide for me based on look. Though I have not ridden it, so maybe I will need to actually ride it to find out.

    For now, I'm using on one of my bike the Selle Italia Monolink SLR. This saddle basically has a "monorail" underneath, unlike most traditional saddles that have the dual-rail, to connect to the seatpost. Monolink system imparts a small width when compared to the traditional dual-rail system. And as such, Selle Italia is able to make the nose narrower on their saddles with monolink. So this is the good part for me. Now I just wish they would make the nose a tad shorter, like 2 inches shorter would be nice!

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matador-IV View Post
    As cxwrench mentioned, you might try the Specialized Power saddle. I was looking for what you describe and tried the Power when it 1st came out. Most comfortable saddle for me. I'm also narrow/light and got a lot of inner thigh rubbing with other saddles.
    curious, do your legs rub the seatpost when they're in the utmost downstroke position? My inner thigh rubs the seatpost, though barely. So if my thigs are rubbing the seapost, so that means ideally, I want the saddle nose to be no wider than the width of the seatpost

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    and it's up there in the ugly department. Now if anyone makes a noseless or short-and-narrow-nose saddle that's no wider than say 140-150mm, and the aesthetic doesn't look like it's for a fat person, then I'd give it a try. Problem with many of these noseless saddle is that they're ugly, to the point that it ruins everything on the bike.
    It would be ugly only when you look at it but not when you ride it. I don't know about you but I'm for the form following function approach.

    BTW, I won't need to ponder on that moon saddle since I already found a saddle (Meld) that works for me even though my measured sit bone width is 110mm (considered as narrower than average).

  14. #64
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    Just slight rub at times on the left. My thighs aren't all that beefy.

    Maybe eliminate the saddle all together and get a nice comfy seatpost ;)

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    curious, do your legs rub the seatpost when they're in the utmost downstroke position? My inner thigh rubs the seatpost, though barely. So if my thigs are rubbing the seapost, so that means ideally, I want the saddle nose to be no wider than the width of the seatpost
    Mine do, I can't used a saddle bag that has a velcro strap around the post...it ruins my bibs. My inner thigh will rub the anodizing off a saddle clamp most of the time. Not w/ the Trek seat mast cap but w/ a normal clamp. I'm gonna try a Pro Stealth and see how that works for me.
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  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    (First of all, a little correction from me. I meant to say I want a saddle with "short and narrow" nose, not "short and wide". I have corrected my post above to state this)

    But ok, I haven't seen a couple riders with the Specialized Power. Nose is still too wide for me based on look. Though I have not ridden it, so maybe I will need to actually ride it to find out.

    For now, I'm using on one of my bike the Selle Italia Monolink SLR. This saddle basically has a "monorail" underneath, unlike most traditional saddles that have the dual-rail, to connect to the seatpost. Monolink system imparts a small width when compared to the traditional dual-rail system. And as such, Selle Italia is able to make the nose narrower on their saddles with monolink. So this is the good part for me. Now I just wish they would make the nose a tad shorter, like 2 inches shorter would be nice!
    I have time on the Power. I'm on the Pro now. Not many if any saddles are narrower in the nose than the Power...

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Mine do, I can't used a saddle bag that has a velcro strap around the post...it ruins my bibs. My inner thigh will rub the anodizing off a saddle clamp most of the time. Not w/ the Trek seat mast cap but w/ a normal clamp. I'm gonna try a Pro Stealth and see how that works for me.
    Maybe I'm reading this wrong but, are you looking for it to limit the rubbing? I've been using the Stealth (152) for some time now. Not sure how it would limit this but, I've got an extra one. 7x7 rails. If by some crazy chance you're going to be near MBGP this week end feel free to test it out for how ever long you need.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Please. There are many good reasons there are probably about 7 or 8 people riding that saddle. You'd have to have some very unique fit issues for that to be the only option. Ever wonder why millions and millions of cyclists ride on saddles that are all shaped remarkably the same?
    I once rode a bike with one of these things on it. Of course, I hated it, mostly because it has no nose. The nose will guide you onto the exact spot you need to be when you sit down after an out-of-saddle pedaling experience. Also, the nose helps hold the bike steady on those fast downhills when you need to be a bit off the seat for rough roads, or for a shimmy. Also, the Moon saddle weighs a ton, compared even to Brooks saddles.

    I can see a few cases where this saddle would be good:

    1) For a lady who is "broad in the beam" on a hybrid.

    2) For a rider with mobility/balance issues on an adult tricycle

    3) For somebody who is morbidly obese.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodys737 View Post
    Maybe I'm reading this wrong but, are you looking for it to limit the rubbing? I've been using the Stealth (152) for some time now. Not sure how it would limit this but, I've got an extra one. 7x7 rails. If by some crazy chance you're going to be near MBGP this week end feel free to test it out for how ever long you need.
    Not to limit rubbing but I've tried a couple out for just a few minutes and they seem pretty comfy and worth a try. Manhattan Beach GP? Not going to be down there but have a great time and thanks for the offer!
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  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodys737 View Post
    Maybe I'm reading this wrong but, are you looking for it to limit the rubbing? I've been using the Stealth (152) for some time now.
    Curious, how wide is the nose on the Stealth, say an inch or so back from the tip?
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  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    Curious, how wide is the nose on the Stealth, say an inch or so back from the tip?
    I'm in a hotel and had to download an online ruler so this is approximate...

    1 inch back it looks like 1 3/4" and 2 inches back approximately 2 inches. It has a profile very similar to the Romin. I have both a carbon rail and a steel rail and the steel rail is more comfortable imo.

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