Saddle for men with prostate issues...
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  1. #1
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    Saddle for men with prostate issues...

    A urologist has told me that my problems with prostatitis may be related to/exacerbated by cycling. I honestly don't cycle that much--maybe 3 or so miles a 4 or so times a week. He recommended that if I want to continue cycling I need to invest in a seat with a nose cutout that won't put pressure the perenium area.

    I've been looking at all of these noseless saddles, but they all seem to state that they aren't for road bikes, which is what I ride. It apparently has something to do with road bike handle bars and saddle being at the same height (or the saddle higher). Furthermore, I recognize that having and using the nose on the saddle for turning and balance and whatnot is particularly important for road bikes, but I'm not sure what my other options are.

    What are my options? I'm not at all opposed to going with a noseless saddle if one will work. I don't race the road bike; I just use it for exercise. So, I think I could adjust to the loss in performance and control due to the loss in the nose.

    Any recommendations?


    Has anyone use these? They seem reasonably priced and look like they could work.

    http://www.ismseat.com/sport_saddle.htm

  2. #2
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    That thing scares me! It looks like you could easily slide off the side of the saddle. A proper fitting saddle will keep you up on your sit bones and off the prostrate, though undoubtably you'll be putting some pressure on your prostrate. I would recomend you see a Dr who is knowledgeable about cycling. Another option is a recumbent bike.

  3. #3
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    Laying down

    Quote Originally Posted by atomheartmother
    A urologist has told me that my problems with prostatitis may be related to/exacerbated by cycling. I honestly don't cycle that much--maybe 3 or so miles a 4 or so times a week. He recommended that if I want to continue cycling I need to invest in a seat with a nose cutout that won't put pressure the perenium area.
    Unlike cyclust, I'm going to focus on your prostate rather than his bizarre fixation on being on the floor (prostrate)

    The key word from your urologist is MAY. If you are perched on the saddle on your "sit bones" with the nose of the saddle properly adjusted, there may be no irritation of the prostate whatsoever. Tieing prostate issues to bike seats is a bit of a hobby for medical folks, but there's not much good data saying that it really is an issue. An obvious question would be: Do your symptoms abate when you take time of the bike? If not, then it doesn't seem likely to be a bike seat issue.

    Beyond that, there are people who just love cutout saddles and others who complain that they make things worse. Only you can figure this out for yourself by working on saddle adjustment, proper seating position, and perhaps trying different saddles to see if that helps. What works for someone else might be a problem for you, and vice versa.

  4. #4
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    I'm with Kerry on this one. I am diagnosed prostate cancer and have been tracking the prostate with blood work, physical exams and biopsies for nearly six years. If I slack on riding, my PSA/freeCell PSA levels spike. If I'm riding a lot, they stabilize. My urologist is very supportive of my riding.

    Unless you're mis-positioned on your saddle, your contact should be the sit-bones.

  5. #5
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    If you only ride 12 miles a week, why don't you stand the entire time, or just take up walking?
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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  6. #6
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    I just tried the Selle SMP Glider and it is the first saddle to totally eliminate pressure on the prostate. Zero numbness.

  7. #7
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    Selle Anatomica - here's the url:
    www.selleanatomica.com

  8. #8
    sml
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    Prologo Nago Pas

  9. #9
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    The problem for me with cutouts is that on either edge of the
    opening, the edge creates more pressure because the
    riders weight is concentrated on those two boundaries.
    I would think a Brooks would be your best bet.
    All I said was that our son, the apple of our three eyes, Martha being a cyclops, our son is a beanbag, and you get testy!

  10. #10
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    I 2nd the Selle SMP. Don't worry about getting one of the expensive ones- as much as you ride, you'd probably be fine on one of the "TRK" versions (which aren't pictured on their website, but can easily be found on ebay or other internet stores).

    I'd also suggest trying a Terry saddle. They all have cutouts to relieve pressure in that area, and Terry has a 30 day no-questions-asked return policy.
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  11. #11
    Hucken The Fard Up !
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    This is the best on the market IMHO



    The selle SMP has a nose too wide for my taste


  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoehn9111
    The problem for me with cutouts is that on either edge of the
    opening, the edge creates more pressure because the
    riders weight is concentrated on those two boundaries.
    I would think a Brooks would be your best bet.
    Well, the edges do create some pressure precisely because the pressure is relieved from the prostrate. I'd say it isn't so much pressure as simple contact that tends to chafe until you get used to the saddle. I rode 147 miles on the second day I had the SMP and got mildly chafed on either side of my crotch.

    You WILL feel more pressure on the sit bones, however. And this, again, is precisely because you are no longer being held up by your prostrate!

    The Brooks comment is funny!

  13. #13
    Larry Lackapants
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    I'm having similar problems and I've found that a FLAT saddle (as viewed from side to side) works best. If it's got a cutout it works even better. Avoid medium or thick padding.
    I'm using now a Velo pronto sl z2 (has got a cutout) and that saddle makes it possible to ride about 100 km a week without major issues - i'm still in the trial and error phase night now.
    from what i've ridden so far (SI Flite , and SI max flite) I can say the max flite is the prostate enemy. That because it's quite wide and I tended to ride on the nose - the nose being quite hard and round. The flite is nice but needed to be broken in. I think the velo is better.

    I'd have tried the Specialized Toupe or a selle SMP if i had that doe to spend on a saddle.

    Happy riding
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  14. #14
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    i'll 3rd the recommendation on the SMP. i've got an evolution
    and it was not too much different from the flite TT and flite Ti
    i was using previously. all's good so far after about 600+ miles.
    Improving on self-torture for more than 3.6^2 years.

  15. #15
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    Prostrate again?

    Quote Originally Posted by thegreatdelcamo
    Well, the edges do create some pressure precisely because the pressure is relieved from the prostrate. I'd say it isn't so much pressure as simple contact that tends to chafe until you get used to the saddle. I rode 147 miles on the second day I had the SMP and got mildly chafed on either side of my crotch.

    You WILL feel more pressure on the sit bones, however. And this, again, is precisely because you are no longer being held up by your prostrate!
    What's with all this prostrate stuff? Prostrate means lying down. Prostate is a male gland. Sheesh.

  16. #16
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    Gotta recommend the Aliante. Most pressure-free saddle I've ever ridden, once set up properly. Correct looks a bit nose-up to most folks.

    I've not been happy with any cutout I've tried, though most have been too padded in the back, and not enough (given their design) at the cut-out. Terry's make me not-happy-at-all. Not bashing, it's just that different things work for different bodies.

    Agree Kerry about the urologist's professional fascination with bike seats. Exactly one made the claim, supported by flawed research. Every other study I'm aware of came away with an 'it depends' sort of conclusion, which either side dices as it sees fit.

    As is so often the case in bike arguments, proper fit is the trump card. With it, the POS stock saddles work fine. Without it, you'll go poor searching for the 'right' saddle.
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  17. #17
    J24
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    Prostate cancer diagnosed too.... and as Kerry said if your saddle is adjusted right and you're sitting on your sit bones where you're supposed to be, then all that magical cut out, gel filled flexiflyer, BS dont matter.

    BTW of the several urologist I talked to during my recebt PC treatments... each one had different and often opposing opinions about the correlation between bike saddles and prostate problems, so their input wasn't real informative either.

  18. #18
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    San Marco Aspide.

  19. #19
    Arrogant roadie.....
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    OK, RBR'ers, can't you smell a shill when one comes here? The guy has 1 post, and then provides a link to the padded toilet-seat that he's shilling!
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  20. #20
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    If that were the case, the OP must not be familiar with the users on this site.
    Re the Brooks, I was not trying to be funny, I have always heard that on a
    weight no consideration scale they were the most comfortable saddle
    available, although I have never tried one, being happy with my SLR.
    All I said was that our son, the apple of our three eyes, Martha being a cyclops, our son is a beanbag, and you get testy!

  21. #21
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    I've ridden with the SMP Evolution and the ISM Adamo Road saddle for this year, each of them for months putting thousands of miles on each of them. Though both seats are comfortable, hands down the ISM Adamo Road is the better prostate saddle. Immediately you notice the difference and I think that is because the saddle is 2" shorter than a regular saddle and of course of the 2 prong fork shape in the front.

  22. #22
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    I'd recommend the saddle with no padding such as SMP Composit. It may seems umcommon feelings for the first ride, but when you'll get use to it, it will be OK. I have prostate issues as well, but with this saddle can take long rides (150 km+) without any problem.
    BTW, my wife couldn't ride any saddle (we tested a lot of them!) and only with that SMP Composit she feels good!
    Play & ride!

  23. #23
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    [QUOTE=atomheartmother;1717844]A urologist has told me that my problems with prostatitis may be related to/exacerbated by cycling. I honestly don't cycle that much--maybe 3 or so miles a 4 or so times a week. He recommended that if I want to continue cycling I need to invest in a seat with a nose cutout that won't put pressure the perenium area.

    I've been looking at all of these noseless saddles, but they all seem to state that they aren't for road bikes, which is what I ride. It apparently has something to do with road bike handle bars and saddle being at the same height (or the saddle higher). Furthermore, I recognize that having and using the nose on the saddle for turning and balance and whatnot is particularly important for road bikes, but I'm not sure what my other options are.

    What are my options? I'm not at all opposed to going with a noseless saddle if one will work. I don't race the road bike; I just use it for exercise. So, I think I could adjust to the loss in performance and control due to the loss in the nose.

    Any recommendations?


    Has anyone use these? They seem reasonably priced and look like they could work.
    Replying months or years later, on 8-19-19. I ride these trendy ISM saddles, they're the only ones I will use these days, super effective AND efficient If you have not tried them yet, you should. Don't let narrow minded traditionalist deter you, they do work, as you shuld know the invention was inspired during time spent on the toilet, as it occurred to creator that his perinium was far more comfortable on the toilet than on the horn of his bikes pricey and traditional racing saddle.
    So if you can look past the goofy look of that unique brand to realize the much better comfort you will realize when riding on this split saddle that has converted so many.

    A good starting point in that line is the first of them all, the ADAMO ROAD
    there are many other models, but it was this one that won over many in the famous German medical male specific saddle test done by DR Frank Sommer in a controlled lab type test that concluded how effective Specialized saddles were in blood flow vs the other popular traditional nose types, while Specialized scored well, it was ISM that blew them all out of the water with a close to or at 100% blood flow with rider in the traditional road racing position riding the stationary bike of that test. This patent even got praise from Specialized own innovative Dr, Dr Minkow. So check these seats out at www.ism.com

  24. #24
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    saddle for men with prostate issues

    "What's with all this prostrate stuff? Prostrate means lying down. Prostate is a male gland. Sheesh."


    That's a good comment, Kerry. As a reward for that maybe we could take you out for a stake dinner.
    Last edited by Mr. Versatile; 2 Weeks Ago at 10:10 AM. Reason: spelling
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  25. #25
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    I can't say anything about corelation between riding and prostate problems, but I can say a word or two about saddle fit and comfort.
    Rule no.1 don't listen to any saddle recommendations...there are more different anatomies than saddle types. What works for someone doesn't work for someone else.
    Rule no.2 don't recommend certain type of saddle to anyone, because you are probably just being reckless and will make necessary cost for that person.
    Rule no.3 borrow from and give to others your saddles to try them. This will help you and others to find good fitting saddles.
    Rule no.4 choice of comfortable saddle might change related to how much you ride, how you ride, what you ride and when you ride. Meaning...it's not the same if you are in peak shape or not, are you feather light climber or big tt rider, are you on aggresive road bike or leisure touring bike, is it summer or winter....

    All together...only you will know what works for you...I can tell you what works for me but I'm certain for you it probably won't.
    I hate cutouts, they increase pressure for me...because seating area is smaller and pressure is higher where I feel it. Even all cutouts are not all the same, some I dont feel (they make no difference) and some are like torture devices.
    I hate fiat saddles, for me saddle must have raised back and curved shape, this is what anatomically helps me.
    I hate short saddles, I don't have enough space on them.
    I hate narrow saddles...my seatbones are too wide for them. But I have strong legs and ride in pretty aggresive position with 14cm of bar to saddle drop, so I need narrow nose, which is hard to find on wide saddle.
    All this together tells me I might fit good on a long saddle (min 280 mm) that is at least 142 mm wide (preferably 150+) with narrow nose, without cutout, with curved shape and rised back.
    So would I reccomend my touring c17 or my racing Aspide to someone else? No!

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