Seat Post Binder Torque for Giant TCR Carbon Frame??
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    936

    Question Seat Post Binder Torque for Giant TCR Carbon Frame??

    Anyone know the what's the max torque for seat post binder bolt for the Giant TCR Composite frame?

    Thanks,
    David

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    766
    Man I would love to know too!

    I have a FSA carbon seatpost in mine, I have been having a real hard time with it slipping.

    Ben

  3. #3
    Le Rouleur
    Reputation: bdx1366's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    74
    FWIW
    I had a problem with post slipping on my TCR , problem solved when I took some fine sand paper and roughed up the section on post that went into seat-tube below binder .Wrap paper around post and then twist seat-post a couple of times , it doesn't take alot very light scuffing ,result was that I used less force and post stop slipping.

  4. #4

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    342

    Lightbulb what slipping

    mine never slips, i dont keep it super tight. i just rotate the wrench like a screw driver till its tight then give it a bit of a lateral turn w/ more force. i have a alien aero carbon post. u guys arn't gresing your tubes r ya? did u use the same post in a frame that once had its seattube greased? how much u weigh? im 165lb? also if u worried about crushin the post just reverse the collar. you could also try settin the collar at an angle so the grip on the post is different

  5. #5
    SoCal--S Beach to the Dam
    Reputation: shokhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,031
    Gota get every bit of grease out of the tube and i use hairspray on my post and tighten it a tad less then alum post.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    766
    Mine doesn't seem to have any grease, it's a brand new bike and this is the first seatpost. I'm still just trying to get the bike dialed in, it's like 2 weeks old, probably less then 200 miles on it.

    I'm in the high 160s weight wise right now, but our roads suck. One frost heave after another.

    I'm going to call the bike shop and see what they say, otherwise maybe I will try scuffing the bottom of the post or something.

    Ben

  7. #7

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    87
    TCR carbon frame with carbon seatpost = 60in/lbs. That's the official answer straight from Giant.

  8. #8
    rock n rolling resistance
    Reputation: 6was9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    851

    What really bugs me is that...

    Quote Originally Posted by KATZRKOL
    Anyone know the what's the max torque for seat post binder bolt for the Giant TCR Composite frame?

    Thanks,
    David
    why aren't these guys including the torgue specs with their products? Out of all the carbon stuff I got(Colnago, ITM, Look, FSA, Reynolds, Easton) I think, I have zero mfg's torque spec! What's the deal?

    I think I did get the torque spec with Campy though.

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    2,601
    For what it's worth ITM has a torque spec on almost all their products. They're included in the manual or you can find them on their website. They'll even sell you the torque wrench.

  10. #10
    rock n rolling resistance
    Reputation: 6was9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    851

    Not my ITM Mil carbon bars...

    Quote Originally Posted by divve
    For what it's worth ITM has a torque spec on almost all their products. They're included in the manual or you can find them on their website. They'll even sell you the torque wrench.
    At least it didn't come with any manual nor is there anything on the bar. I suppose I'll check there site again; I rememebr their site being kinda limited.

  11. #11

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    35

    Minimal torque in this case

    A seat post installation is best done with minimal torque. A measured torque value is not always useful in securing a seat post into a frame. Remember the idea is simply to keep the post from slipping down when you ride.

    The ID of the frames vary quite a bit, as does the finish. This means a constant torque value is not realistic.

    It is best to begin simply snug and try to twist the post. An old CPSC regulation gives us useful test. The nose of should not move when a 50 pound load is applied. An old test is to try to push the nose with only one hand. If it does not slip, stop and ride the bike. It is NOT necessary the saddle be fully locked up and not move when both hands are used. It does not take that much torque to keep the saddle from slipping.

    Again, in this case, let the results dictate the torque.

    For other torque values see http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/torque.shtml

  12. #12

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    2,601
    Quote Originally Posted by 6was9
    At least it didn't come with any manual nor is there anything on the bar. I suppose I'll check there site again; I rememebr their site being kinda limited.
    ITM recommends whatever is on the stem minus 2Nm for carbon bars....I never use a torque wrench however. The exception is "The Stem" where the torque value is always 6Nm....but anyone riding that probably has got other things to worry about

    Check out their site. It's worth looking at and they got a complete page just on torque and a pdf on assembly.

    http://www.itm.it/catalogo/inglese/s...d=167&tab=news
    http://www.itm.it/pdfs/GU_c_eng.pdf

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    766
    I took my bike in and they sprayed some extra clearcoat on the seatpost to make it just a tad thicker.

    Hope it does the job. I really didn't want to torque it down much.

    BTW, 60in/lb is a very low torque value.

    Ben

  14. #14

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by benInMA
    BTW, 60in/lb is a very low torque value.

    Ben
    I agree, but that's what came from the Giant warranty/service department in, I believe, California. I called the 800 number off the main web site.

    I just make sure both the frame and seatpost are clean by using denatured alcohol and it doesn't slip under my 195 pounds.

    edit: FYI: The aluminum framed TCRs were 120in/lbs as recommended by Giant.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.