Seat Post Specific
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  1. #1
    Just.. a guy..
    Reputation: IgottaMiyata's Avatar
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    Seat Post Specific

    So I am unfamiliar with the rule that pertain to seat posts. I i have a seat post that will fit on my road bike but is made by a MTB bike parts company and is not listed as a road bike part, but is light enough to run on my road bike. Would Lance Armstrong think of me as less of a man for running MTB parts on a road bike? Is there a specific credo to proper seat post usage in roads? I know in the past when I race 20inchers you ran what was light cheap and worked for you.

  2. #2
    Old and Fixed, Moderator
    Reputation: Dave Hickey's Avatar
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    If it fits, go for it...there are no rules......
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Just.. a guy..
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    I promise I will have more better typing skills in my next thread. Get it.

  4. #4
    hello
    Reputation: roadfix's Avatar
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    In general, the only diff between mtb and road posts is the length. Mtb posts are always much longer.
    SurlySteamrollerLitespeedClassicBianchiPista
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  5. #5
    chamois creme addict
    Reputation: Eric_H's Avatar
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    FYI, Lance wore a Fred-like MTB-inspired visor on his helmet during at least one of the Tour of California stages. So I am pretty sure he will be OK with the MTB seatpost

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: JCavilia's Avatar
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    you ran what was light cheap and worked for you.
    That sounds like a good rule.* Lance probably won't find out unless somebody tells on you, and I promise not to.

    *One qualification: it's often said of road-bike parts that there are three parameters (light, cheap, strong), and you can only get 2 of the 3 in any one part. So be careful that your light, cheap things don't break too easily. This probably does not apply to your seatpost, which is probably not all that light. How heavy would it have to be to not be "light enough to run on [your] road bike"? I didn't know there was a rule about that, either.

  7. #7

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    Dull, uninventive people stick to a gruppo of parts on their bikes - because it's easier this way.

    Daring and resourceful people experiment with a wide variety of parts - because it's more fun this way.

    Puchnuts - Proud owner of 2 customized high-end Frankenbikes.

  8. #8
    Just.. a guy..
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    Like I said, if its cheap and light run it, I have a banana seat from a 88 schwinn girls bike of it right now.. with a sissy bar.

  9. #9
    Adventure Seeker
    Reputation: Peanya's Avatar
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    Think about it this way - many people put crank bros pedals on their road bikes...
    I have a single track mind

  10. #10
    Roadie with unshaven legs
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    The American Classic seatpost on my Colnago was a mountain bike version that I cut down from its original 350mm length down to about 200mm. Would anyone notice? Nope.

    That's actually a tactic I used on a few of my bikes: I bought used mountain bike length light weight seatposts and cut them down. Because the seatposts were clamped near the bottom, when I cut it down to road bike length, I end up with a like new seatpost for less than half the cost of the same post brand new.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Yep. Done that a couple of times. Currently building a "new" road bike, with the goal of not using -any- new parts. Cables and bar wrap excluded. A mtb post may just find it's way in.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    The only "Rule" with a seatpost is that it's better to ride with a saddle attached to it.

  13. #13
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    Unless of course, you're Marla Streb. If I remember correctly, she won her first, and the first Single Speed World Championship, breaking her seatpost very early in the race. She rode nearly the entire race out of the saddle.

    Someone clarify or correct...?

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nfosterma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric_H
    FYI, Lance wore a Fred-like MTB-inspired visor on his helmet during at least one of the Tour of California stages. So I am pretty sure he will be OK with the MTB seatpost
    A few years ago when LA was considering to qualify for the Olympics in both road and cross country, I remember him having riser bars with bar ends. Big no-no at the time.

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