Shimano 8000 Ultegra and 130 mm spacing - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by cs1 View Post
    I need a 135mm rim brake wheel and got real excited when I heard Ultegra was 135. Now it’s back to sadness and despair.
    White Industry MI5 is a great rear hub for that.

    My cross frame has 135mm spacing so I've looked into this and there are not many options out there. But fortunately MI5 hubs are great so that's not a problem.

    I seem to recall Phil Wood also makes a 135mm they call a 'touring' hub too that's supposedly pretty good but weighs a ton.

    If you happen to have a steel frame using a 130 hub is fine. Or so I was told by the maker of my 135mm spaced steel frame.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Which wheels are you going to get?
    I found a deal on DT swiss 350 hubs and 411 rims build at Colorado Cyclist. They are not the ultimate hotness but look really nice. The total was a little over $600 with the advertized coupon.

    Between the new group and new wheelset, it will feel like my Seven is brand new again.

    Now I need to start saving so I can have the exact same frame built Ti.

    I remembered the original wheel builder as well, Odd and Endos. Seems the guy has been out of business for several years. And the hubset brand was SpeedCific.
    Last edited by BillMX; 07-22-2019 at 05:30 AM.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillMX View Post
    I'm not up to date on all the new tech.

    I have an approximately 12-year-old Dura-Ace 10-speed group. I think it is the 7800 series. I have a dead right shifter and weighing my options. Try to track down a shifter set or replace it with Ultegra 8000 series.
    I've been there. 7800 shifter fails. A simple albeit temporary fix is to spray liberal amounts of WD-40 inside the shifter mechanism, so it's dripping out. Let it drip dry for a day. This loosens up the old sticky grease so the shifter will function properly for 6 to 9 months. Worked for me anyway.

    Last year I finally replaced the whole groupset with Ultegra R-8000 and it kicks ass. A worthy upgrade. Vastly improved shifting performance the the rim brakes are much more powerful having a completely different caliper design. And it looks better to.

    -S

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIF View Post
    I've been there. 7800 shifter fails. A simple albeit temporary fix is to spray liberal amounts of WD-40 inside the shifter mechanism, so it's dripping out. Let it drip dry for a day. This loosens up the old sticky grease so the shifter will function properly for 6 to 9 months. Worked for me anyway.

    Last year I finally replaced the whole groupset with Ultegra R-8000 and it kicks ass. A worthy upgrade. Vastly improved shifting performance the the rim brakes are much more powerful having a completely different caliper design. And it looks better to.

    -S
    I've been giving them the WD-40 bath for the last year. It finally reached the point it wasn't working

    Good to know the R-8000 is a good group. I barely get enough time to ride as it is. I don't want to futz around for 20 minutes just to be able to get on the road.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillMX View Post
    I found a deal on DT swiss 350 hubs and 411 rims build at Colorado Cyclist. They are not the ultimate hotness but look really nice. The total was a little over $600 with the advertized coupon.
    R411 and R460 rims are a great bang for the buck. The R411 is the lower profile answer to the deeper R460. I don't really care for DT hubs as their freehub is noisy, but some people like that. A couple of years ago, I built up a pair of wheels with R460 rims and Dura-Ace 9000 hubs.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    R411 and R460 rims are a great bang for the buck. The R411 is the lower profile answer to the deeper R460. I don't really care for DT hubs as their freehub is noisy, but some people like that. A couple of years ago, I built up a pair of wheels with R460 rims and Dura-Ace 9000 hubs.
    I chose the R411 because they had the option of the offset rear rim.

    Now I need to buy the right BB tool to remove the old BB and add the new one.

  7. #32
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    Is the frame steel? If it's steel, then you can gently spread the stays to accommodate a 135 spaced hub. If it's aluminum, then probably not. 8000 needs 135mm spacing.
    Quote Originally Posted by BillMX View Post
    I'm not up to date on all the new tech.

    I have an approximately 12-year-old Dura-Ace 10-speed group. I think it is the 7800 series. I have a dead right shifter and weighing my options. Try to track down a shifter set or replace it with Ultegra 8000 series.
    Quote Originally Posted by BillMX View Post
    I've been giving them the WD-40 bath for the last year. It finally reached the point it wasn't working

    Good to know the R-8000 is a good group. I barely get enough time to ride as it is. I don't want to futz around for 20 minutes just to be able to get on the road.
    Follow the directions for the front derailleur to the letter. Better yet watch the video a bunch. It's different from any front derailleur on the planet. If you do it correctly it works really well. It's right if you get a mm or so of movement in the big rim trim position and about 3-4mm movement when you go all the way over the small ring. Cage to chain clearance is very close.
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  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Follow the directions for the front derailleur to the letter. Better yet watch the video a bunch. It's different from any front derailleur on the planet. If you do it correctly it works really well. It's right if you get a mm or so of movement in the big rim trim position and about 3-4mm movement when you go all the way over the small ring. Cage to chain clearance is very close.
    Good to know. Thanks for passing that along.

    It's been a long time, but the setup on the front derailleurs seem to get more touchy with every new iteration. I can only imagine with 11 sp how close the tolerances are.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillMX View Post
    Good to know. Thanks for passing that along.

    It's been a long time, but the setup on the front derailleurs seem to get more touchy with every new iteration. I can only imagine with 11 sp how close the tolerances are.
    IMO the R-series FDs are even easier to adjust than earlier models-you have a mark for correct tension, and a secondary support screw that butts up against the hanger tab or frame to fine tune cage angle.

  10. #35
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bremerradkurier View Post
    IMO the R-series FDs are even easier to adjust than earlier models-you have a mark for correct tension, and a secondary support screw that butts up against the hanger tab or frame to fine tune cage angle.
    But you have to follow the directions precisely. If you 'think' you know how to set up a derailleur and go by what you've always done you'll mess it up. It's not 'difficult', you just have to pay attention.
    I work for some bike racers
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